Child Abuse & Neglect

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Review of Interventions Addressing Child Maltreatment Identifies Promising Practices and Calls for Further Research

A new report provides valuable information about what works for a particularly vulnerable population of our nation’s young people.

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Ensuring the Well-Being of all Victims of Human Trafficking

ACF is strengthening the coordination of human trafficking victim services within HHS and across federal agencies.

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New ACYF Projects Promote Integrated Approach in Child Welfare

ACYF funds grants, cooperative agreements, and demonstration projects to promote social and emotional well-being, along with safety and permanency, for children and youth who come to the attention of the child welfare system.

Picture of child hiding behind door with text: Child Abuse and Neglect in Decline

Fewer Child Abuse and Neglect Incidents for Fifth Straight Year

Work continues to coordinate efforts among federal, state and local agencies to focus on child maltreatment prevention.

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More ACF programs are using social media to promote services

Every month, more Administration for Children and Families programs are coming online and promoting their services on the Internet with social media tools. Have you subscribed or “friended” these pages yet?

18th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect logo

Child Welfare Advocates Arrive in Washington, D.C.

This week child welfare advocates from all sectors of society (social work, education and law enforcement) will converge in Washington, D.C., for the 18th National Conference on Child Abuse and Neglect.  This conference is the nation’s leading training event for policy makers, practitioners and researchers involved in promote child safety and well-being.

Silhouette of a child playing on a tire swing.

Protecting Our Children

You can’t always see the effects of child abuse. They go far beyond bruises and broken bones. Children who are beaten, sexually or emotionally abused or neglected suffer the consequences of adversity long after their outward wounds heal. Recent research suggests that children who endure “toxic stress”—sensing persistent threat but no protector—are at risk for a host of developmental, intellectual, emotional and behavioral problems as they grow up.

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