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4.3 MEPA/IEAP, Guidance for Compliance

Items with a star (*) and gray background have been modified from previous record.

Question Number 7:
12/30/2002 - Current
QuestionMay public agencies decline to transracially place any child with a foster/adoptive parent who has unsatisfactory cultural competency skills?
Answer*Good practice requires an assessment of the capacity of potential foster/adoptive parents to accommodate all the needs of a particular child. It is conceivable that in a particular instance race, color or national origin would be a necessary consideration to achieve the best interests of the child. However, any placement decision must take place in a framework that assesses the strengths and weaknesses of prospective parents to meet all of a child's needs so as to provide for the child's best interests. Prospective parents should be offered, typically through training provided by an agency, information sufficient to confirm or broaden their understanding of what types of children for whom they might most appropriately provide a home.
Source/DateACYF-CB-IM-98-03 (5/11/98)
Legal and Related ReferencesSocial Security Act - Titles IV-B and IV-E; The Small Business Job Protection Act of 1996 (PL104-188); The Multiethnic Placement Act of 1994 (PL 103-382)

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02/19/2001 - 12/30/2002 (Original Record)
QuestionMay public agencies decline to transracially place any child with a foster/adoptive parent who has unsatisfactory cultural competency skills?
AnswerGood practice requires an assessment of the capacity of potential foster/adoptive parents to accommodate all the needs of a particular child. It is conceivable that in a particular instance race, color or national origin would be a necessary consideration to achieve the best interests of the child. However, any placement decision must take place in a framework that assesses the strengths and weaknesses of prospective parents to meet all of a child''s needs so as to provide for the child''s best interests. Prospective parents should be offered, typically through training provided by an agency, information sufficient to confirm or broaden their understanding of what types of children for whom they might most appropriately prove a home.
Source/DateACYF-CB-IM-98-03 (5/11/98)
Legal and Related ReferencesSocial Security Act - Titles IV-B and IV-E; The Small Business Job Protection Act of 1996 (PL104-188); The Multiethnic Placement Act of 1994 (PL 103-382)

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