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4.3 MEPA/IEAP, Guidance for Compliance

Items with a star (*) and gray background have been modified from previous record.

Question Number 8:
07/30/2010 - Current
QuestionHow can public agencies assure themselves that they have identified an appropriate placement for a child for whom racial, national origin, ethnic and/or cultural needs have been documented?
Answer*Adoption agencies must consider all factors that may contribute to a good placement decision for a child, and that may affect whether a particular placement is in the best interests of the child. Such agencies may assure themselves of the fitness of their work in a number of ways, including case review conferences with supervisors, peer reviews, judicial oversight, and quality control measures employed by title IV-E agencies and licensing authorities. In some instances it is conceivable that, for a particular child, race, color or national origin would be such a factor. Permanency being the sine qua non of adoptive placements, monitoring the rates of disruption or dissolution of adoptions would also be appropriate. Where it has been established that considerations of race, color or national origin are necessary to achieve the best interests of a child, such factor(s) should be included in the agency's decision-making, and would appropriately be included in reviews and quality control measures such as those described above.
Source/DateACYF-CB-IM-98-03 (5/11/98)
Legal and Related ReferencesSocial Security Act - Titles IV-B and IV-E; The Small Business Job Protection Act of 1996 (PL104-188); The Multiethnic Placement Act of 1994 (PL 103-382)

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02/19/2001 - 07/30/2010 (Original Record)
QuestionHow can public agencies assure themselves that they have identified an appropriate placement for a child for whom racial, national origin, ethnic and/or cultural needs have been documented?
AnswerAdoption agencies must consider all factors that may contribute to a good placement decision for a child, and that may affect whether a particular placement is in the best interests of the child. Such agencies may assure themselves of the fitness of their work in a number of ways, including case review conferences with supervisors, peer reviews, judicial oversight, and quality control measures employed by State agencies and licensing authorities. In some instances it is conceivable that, for a particular child, race, color or national origin would be such a factor. Permanency being the sine qua non of adoptive placements, monitoring the rates of disruption or dissolution of adoptions would also be appropriate. Where it has been established that considerations of race, color or national origin are necessary to achieve the best interests of a child, such factor(s) should be included in the agency''s decision-making, and would appropriately be included in reviews and quality control measures such as those described above.
Source/DateACYF-CB-IM-98-03 (5/11/98)
Legal and Related ReferencesSocial Security Act - Titles IV-B and IV-E; The Small Business Job Protection Act of 1996 (PL104-188); The Multiethnic Placement Act of 1994 (PL 103-382)

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