Administration for Children and Families
 
 
Administration on Children, Youth and Families
 
Comprehensive Support Services for Families Affected by Substance Abuse and/or HIV/AIDS
HHS-2013-ACF-ACYF-CB-0592
Application Due Date: 05/13/2013

 

Comprehensive Support Services for Families Affected by Substance Abuse and/or HIV/AIDS
HHS-2013-ACF-ACYF-CB-0592
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Overview
Executive Summary
Section I. Funding Opportunity Description
Section II. Award Information
Section III. Eligibility Information
  1. Eligible Applicants
  2. Cost Sharing or Matching
  3. Other - (if applicable)
Section IV. Application and Submission Information
  1. Address to Request Application Package
  2. Content and Form of Application Submission
  3. Submission Dates and Times
  4. Intergovernmental Review
  5. Funding Restrictions
  6. Other Submission Requirements
Section V. Application Review Information
  1. Criteria
  2. Review and Selection Process
  3. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates
Section VI. Award Administration Information
  1. Award Notices
  2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements
  3. Reporting
Section VII. Agency Contact(s)
Section VIII. Other Information
Comprehensive Support Services for Families Affected by Substance Abuse and/or HIV/AIDS
HHS-2013-ACF-ACYF-CB-0592
ANNOUNCEMENT MODIFICATION | VALIDATE & APPROVE
 
Department of Health & Human Services
Administration for Children and Families
 
Program Office:Administration on Children, Youth and Families - Children's Bureau
Funding Opportunity Title:Comprehensive Support Services for Families Affected by Substance Abuse and/or HIV/AIDS
Announcement Type:Modification
Funding Opportunity Number:HHS-2013-ACF-ACYF-CB-0592
Primary CFDA Number: 93.551
Due Date for Applications: 05/13/2013
 
Executive Summary

 

Notices:

  • On January 1, 2012, the Administration for Children and Families implemented required electronic application submission via www.grants.gov for discretionary grant applications. Please see Section III.3. Disqualification Factors, Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission and Application Submission Options, and Section IV.3. Explanation of Due Dates and Times for information on electronic application submission and the availability of exemptions allowing applicants to submit applications in paper format.

  • This Fiscal Year (FY 2013) ACF has implemented a new application upload requirement. Each applicant applying electronically via www.grants.gov is required to upload only two electronic files, excluding Standard Forms and OMB-approved forms. No more than two files will be accepted for the review, and additional files will be removed.  Standard Forms and OMB-approved forms will not be considered additional files.  Please see Section IV.2 Content and Form of Application Submission for detailed information on this requirement.

Executive Summary

The Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF), Children's Bureau (CB), announces the availability of competitive grants authorized by the Abandoned Infants Assistance Act of 1988, as amended. These grants will be awarded to eligible applicants for activities and services that are designed to increase well-being, improve permanency, and enhance the safety of infants and young children who have been exposed to a dangerous drug or have been exposed to HIV/AIDs and/or at risk of being placed in out-of-home care as a result of the parent(s)' substance abuse or HIV status.†

The purposes of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA)†are as follows:

  • To develop and implement programs of comprehensive community-based support services for infants and young children, particularly those who have been perinatally exposed to a dangerous drug; those with, or who have been perinatally exposed to, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); or those who have a life-threatening illness or other special medical need, and their natural families, including older siblings;
  • To implement and sequence effective, evidence-based substance abuse interventions and parent and child interventions to reduce substance use, increase parenting capacities, and increase child social and emotional functioning and well-being;
  • To evaluate the implementation and outcomes of these comprehensive support services; and
  • To develop these programs as identifiable sites that other States/locales seeking to implement comprehensive support services for this target population can look to for guidance, insight, and possible replication.

Applicants are encouraged to have a coordinated or collaborative infrastructure in place that can enhance the project's capacity to meet a broad range of needs for families involved in substance abuse and/or HIV/AIDs issues. Applicants are encouraged to test targeted approaches to substance and HIV/AIDs issues affecting the family (including older siblings) and the applicant may choose to focus the project's efforts on a particular point along the continuum of services from prevention treatment to aftercare services. Funds may be used for services that are consistent with the proposed grant proposal and may include, but not be limited to, work with:†

  • Community-based, family-based substance abuse treatment services;
  • Early intervention and preventative services;
  • Trauma screening, developmental and†functional assessment, and on-going progress monitoring to determine the extent to which interventions are making a difference;
  • Child and parent and/or caregiver interventions to measurably improve child-parent/caregiver functioning and interactions;
  • Referrals to mental health services;
  • Substance abuse treatment services; and/or
  • Parenting interventions to measurably improve parenting capacities.

When considering a service approach and anticipating program outcomes, applicants should carefully review the full announcement and consider the programmatic and evaluation related activities. To successfully increase well-being, improve permanency, and enhance safety for children affected by substance and/or HIV/AIDs, the applicant†is to†consider implementing evidence-based, evidenced-informed, and/or trauma-informed practices or other effective treatments that measurably improve parent substance abuse, increase parenting capacities, and improve child social and emotional well-being and functioning. Additionally, the applicants should provide evidence that these interventions are an appropriate fit for the characteristics and needs of the targeted service population and that the treatments services are feasible, based on the capacity and resources available.

I. Funding Opportunity Description

Statutory Authority

The legislative authority is Section 101 of the Abandoned Infants Assistance Act of 1988, Public Law 100-505, as amended, 42 U.S.C., Section 670.

Description

Among the purposes of Public Law 100-505, the Abandoned Infants Assistance Act of 1988, as amended, are to establish a program of local support services projects in order:

  • To prevent the abandonment in hospitals of infants and young children, particularly those who have been perinatally exposed to a dangerous drug, those with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or who have been perinatally exposed to the virus, or those who have a life-threatening illness or other special medical needs;
  • To identify and address the needs of those infants and children who are, or might be, abandoned;
  • To develop a program of comprehensive support services for these infants and young children and their natural families (see Definitions) that include, but are not limited to, foster family care services, case management services, family support services, respite and crisis intervention services, counseling services, and group residential home services; and
  • To recruit and train health and social services personnel, foster care families, and residential care providers to meet the needs of abandoned children and infants and children who are at risk of abandonment.  

The legislation also allows for the provision of a technical assistance training program to support the planning, development, and operation of the local comprehensive support services projects. The reauthorized legislation requires the Secretary to give priority to applicants located in States that have developed and implemented procedures for expedited termination of parental rights and placement for adoption of infants determined to be abandoned under State law. 

Definitions

Abandoned and Abandonment: The terms "abandoned" and "abandonment," used with respect to infants and young children, mean that the infants and young children are medically cleared for discharge from acute-care hospital settings, but remain hospitalized because of a lack of appropriate out-of-hospital placement alternatives.

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS): The term "acquired immune deficiency syndrome" includes infection with the etiologic agent for such syndrome, any condition indicating that an individual is infected with such etiologic agent, and any condition arising from such etiologic agent.

Dangerous Drug: The term "dangerous drug" means a controlled substance, as defined in section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802).

Natural Family: The term "natural family" shall be broadly interpreted to include natural parents, grandparents, family members, guardians, children residing in the household, and individuals residing in the household on a continuing basis who are in a care-giving situation, with respect to infants and young children covered under this Act. 

Ensuring the Well-Being of Vulnerable Children and Families 

The Administration on Children, Youth and Families (ACYF) is committed to facilitating healing and recovery and promoting the social and emotional well-being of children who have experienced maltreatment, exposure to violence, and/or trauma. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) and other discretionary spending this fiscal year are designed to ensure that effective interventions are in place to measurably build skills and capacities that contribute to the healthy, positive, and productive functioning of children and youth into adulthood. Applicants are encouraged to review the Children's Bureau (CB) Information Memorandum on Promoting Social and Emotional Well-Being for Children and Youth Receiving Child Welfare Services https://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/resource/im1204 in developing their proposals.

Children who have experienced maltreatment, exposure to violence, and/or trauma are impacted along several domains, each of which must be addressed in order to foster social and emotional well-being, and promote healthy positive functioning. 

Understanding Experiences: A fundamental aspect of the human experience is the development of a world view through which one's experiences are understood. Whether that perspective is generally positive or negative impacts how experiences are interpreted and integrated. For example, one is more likely to approach a challenge as a surmountable, temporary obstacle if his or her frame of reference includes a sense that "things will turn out alright." On the contrary, negative experiences can color how future experiences are understood. Ongoing experiences of abuse might lead children to believe they deserve to be maltreated and affect their ability to enter into and stay engaged in safe and healthy relationships. Interventions should seek to address how young people frame what has happened to them in the past and their beliefs about the future. 

Developmental Tasks: People grow physically and psycho-socially along a fairly predictable course, encountering normal challenges and establishing competencies as they pass from one developmental stage to another. However, adverse events have a marked effect on the trajectory of normal social and emotional development, delaying the growth of certain capacities, and, in many cases, accelerating the maturation of others. Intervention strategies must be attuned to the developmental impact of negative experiences and address related strengths and deficits to ensure children and youth develop along a healthy trajectory. 

Coping Strategies: The methods that young people develop to manage challenges both large and small are learned in childhood, honed in adolescence, and practiced in adulthood. Those who have been presented with healthy stressors and opportunities to overcome them with appropriate encouragement and support are more likely to have an array of positive, productive coping strategies available to them as they go through life. For children who grow up in unsafe, unpredictable environments, the coping strategies that may have protected them in that context may not be appropriate for safer, more regulated situations. Interventions should help children and youth transform maladaptive coping methods into healthier, more productive strategies. 

Protective Factors: A wealth of research has demonstrated that the presence of certain contextual factors (e.g., supportive relatives, involvement in after-school activities) and characteristics (e.g., self-esteem, relationship skills) can moderate the impacts of past and future negative experiences. These protective factors are fundamental to resilience; building them is integral to successful intervention with children, youth, and families. 

The skills and capacities in these areas support children and youth as challenges, risks, and opportunities arise. In particular, each domain impacts the capacity of young people to establish and maintain positive relationships with caring adults and supportive peers. The necessity of these relationships to social and emotional well-being and lifelong success in school, community, and at home cannot be overstated and should be integral to all interventions with vulnerable children and youth. Additionally, building these skills and capacities through the implementation of effective interventions will ready children, youth, and families for positive permanency outcomes.

An important component of promoting social and emotional well-being includes addressing the impact of trauma, which can have a profound effect on the overall functioning of children and youth. ACYF promotes a trauma-informed approach, which involves understanding and responding to the symptoms of chronic interpersonal trauma and traumatic stress across the domains outlined above, as well as the behavioral and mental health sequelae of trauma. 

ACYF anticipates a continued focus on social and emotional well-being as a critical component of its overall mission to ensure the safety, permanency, and well-being of children. 

BACKGROUND 

Direct service programs that receive funding from CB under the Abandoned Infants Assistance (AIA) Act are diverse, operating out of hospitals, community-based agencies, and child welfare agencies. While they each provide a set of services tailored to meet the needs of their specific populations and circumstances, in aggregate, they have historically provided the following services: case management, parenting education and support, transportation assistance, basic resource assistance, mental health counseling, home visiting, infant developmental screening and intervention, primary health care for infants and young children, and drug treatment and recovery support.

Services are intended to measurably improve child and family health, well-being, and stability. Effective, and to the extent possible, evidence-based interventions should be implemented and sequenced to: 1) reduce parental substance abuse; 2) increase parenting capacities; and 3) improve child functioning and social and emotional well-being. Parents and children should be demonstrably better off as a result of programs funded under this funding opportunity.

AIA programs serve biological, kinship, foster, and adoptive families who care for drug and HIV affected children. These children may have been abandoned in hospitals or are at risk of abandonment. These families face an array of complex societal problems including poverty; homelessness; substance and alcohol abuse; physically, sexually, and emotionally abusive relationships or histories; HIV infection; and mental illness. Information about current and previously funded grants under this program is available at:

Projects funded under this program receive training and technical assistance from the National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center whose mission is to enhance the quality of social and health services delivered to children who are abandoned or at risk of abandonment due to the presence of drugs and/or HIV in the family. The AIA Resource Center is part of CB's Training and Technical Assistance (T/TA) Network, which is designed to improve child welfare systems and to support States and tribes in achieving sustainable, systemic change that results in greater safety, permanency, and well-being for children, youth, and families. 

Funded projects collaborate with the AIA Resource Center to share knowledge being developed with other grantees and the wider field. The AIA Resource Center helps disseminate the knowledge developed in these projects in a way that will make it accessible and useful to States and tribes, and to the T/TA Network as it provides training and technical assistance.  

Related Federal Efforts 

In recent years, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has undertaken a number of projects and activities to explore and address the issue of substance abuse among families. Listed below are links to websites containing information. Applicants may wish to review these resources as they develop their applications.  

ACYF has placed an emphasis on promoting well-being as fully integrated with safety and permanency for children in the child welfare system, and finding effective ways to address concurrent substance abuse and child welfare issues in families. Recent child welfare literature describes the extent and scope of the problem of substance abuse in the general, and specifically in the child welfare population, the types of services needed by this population, and the effectiveness of these services. The building of collaborative relationships, timely access to comprehensive and effective substance abuse treatment services, the engagement of families in ongoing recovery, the availability of evidence-based children and family services, and the filling of information gaps are all identified as important actions that must occur in order to improve outcomes for vulnerable children and families. 

CB currently funds approximately 300 discretionary grants over 50 different program areas. Through their work with a broad spectrum of populations within the child welfare arena, discretionary grantees develop a wealth of knowledge across numerous program areas. The findings from these programs can be useful in informing the field of promising practices. Specifically, CB has addressed the issues related to substance abuse and child welfare through a number of avenues, including formula and discretionary grants. Applicants are strongly encouraged to utilize the knowledge being developed by CB discretionary research and demonstration projects and other related T/TA activities when developing proposals in response to this FOA. For more information on CB discretionary grant programs, please see http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/programs_fund/index.htm#disc and http://basis.caliber.com/cbgrants/ws/library/docs/cb_grants/GrantHome.  

Resources covering a wide range of topics from prevention to permanency, including child welfare, child abuse and neglect, and adoption can be accessed online at http://www.childwelfare.gov 

Tips for Preparing a Competitive Application  

It is essential that applicants read the entire announcement package carefully before preparing an application and include all of the required application forms and attachments. The application must reflect a thorough understanding of and support the purpose and objectives of the applicable legislation.  Reviewers expect applicants to understand the goals of the legislation and CB's interest in each topic. and to address and follow all of the evaluation criteria in ways that demonstrate this understanding. Applications that do not clearly address the evaluation criteria or program requirements generally receive very low scores and are rarely funded. 

CB's website (http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb) provides a wide range of information and links to other relevant websites. Before preparing an application, applicants can learn more about CB's mission and programs by exploring the website. 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

NOTE: See Section IV. Application and Submission Information/The Project Description for additional instructions for applicants. 

The target population of the AIA Program is infants and young children, particularly those who have been perinatally exposed to a dangerous drug; those with, or who have been perinatally exposed to, HIV; or those who have a life-threatening illness or other special medical need, and their natural families. These infants and their families have numerous and complex service needs that are likely to require the services of many different community-based agencies. Impaired by their substance addictions and/or weakened by their HIV/AIDS status, these parents are less likely to engage in appropriate parenting practices and therefore deprive their children of basic nurturing and care-taking. Children of these parents are more likely to have poorer physical, intellectual, emotional, and development outcomes, and are at risk of being placed in out-of-home-care and of developing challenging healthy outcomes. 

Projects funded under this FOA must utilize an existing consortium of community-based service providers or develop a consortium to coordinate services and/or collaborate on services provision. Qualified faith-based and community organizations and courts may be part of the consortium organizing and/or delivering these services. These projects must take a systemic approach to obtaining and providing a comprehensive set of services to this client population.

The variety of community-based programs and services provided by AIA programs are structured to prevent the abandonment of infants and young children affected by substance abuse and/or HIV/AIDS, including, but not limited to:

  • Case management and oversight, to include court services;
  • Parenting interventions to increase parenting capacities;
  • Drug treatment and recovery support;
  • Infant trauma screening, developmental and functional assessment, and effective interventions to improve social and emotional well-being and functioning;
  • Mental health interventions;
  • Home visiting;
  • Primary health care for infants and young children to improve health outcomes;
  • Basic resource assistance; and
  • Transportation assistance.

In order to ensure the service array yields measurable improvements in parental substance abuse, parenting capacities, and child functioning, evidence-based interventions should be selected whenever practicable. These interventions should be implemented and sequenced in a thoughtful manner to increase the likelihood of success. Trauma screening, developmental, and functional assessments can be used in ongoing progress monitoring to show the extent to which the interventions are making a difference.

The service array provided by AIA programs must be designed to promote the development of protective factors that support the healthy development of child(ren) of substance-abusing and/or HIV/AIDS-affected parent(s), promote better outcomes for these families, and reduce the likelihood of these children entering care. CB is interested in supporting programs that further the understanding of the complex ways risk and protective factors interact to affect positive family functioning. Five factors that have been associated with reducing the incidence of abuse and neglect are:

  1. Parental resilience;
  2. Nurturing and attachment;
  3. Social connections;
  4. Concrete supports for parents; and
  5. Knowledge of parenting and child and youth development.  

Services should include a broad base of supports for families that also promote their ability to problem-solve to resolve family issues and promote strong attachments between parents and child(ren). Services should include provision of basic needs such as food, clothing, access to shelter, and access to health care through collaboration with other community agencies. Parents who experience substance abuse and/or have HIV/AIDs have many life challenges that compound the stress of parenting and affect the safety of their children and their own ability to keep families together. Many have parenting deficits that affect children from birth and lack knowledge of the psychosocial developmental needs of their children. Understanding and intervening to enhance parenting capacities and improve child functioning is a complex issue when parents are abusing substances and/or have HIV/AIDS. Intervention to help parents understand the developmental and emotional needs of their children is important and complicated. The adverse childhood and adult experiences of the parents may weaken their effort made to bond with their children.

Efforts must be made to impact the quality of parent-child relationships; to strengthen the emotional bonds between parent and child; to increase parental resilience to the stresses of parenting; to improve the parent’s ability to meet the emotional needs of their children; and to improve parental action in changing/understanding their child’s behavior. Integrated intervention to address the needs of substance-abusing and/or HIV/AIDs infected mothers must occur in a fuller context of social and economic conditions of the mother. Interventions that include interpersonal and coping skills, educational and vocational programs, and social support networks to decrease isolation and parental support and knowledge of child development are all issues that help increase parenting skills and may help to reduce drug dependency. Points of intervention can be prenatal, birth, neonatal or perinatal, or any intervention that would prevent the separation of an infant or very young child from their parent and prevent placement in the child protective services system.

Substance-abusing and HIV/AIDS-affected families experience extreme stress and a network of support can mitigate the negative effects of stress for parent(s) while supporting the child(ren)'s developmental needs. Programs can assist parent(s) in making social contact (through peer-to-peer counseling, group meetings to celebrate holidays or other community events) to reduce isolation - a consistent risk factor for drug use and other negative family functioning. 

In order to provide needed services and efficiently use all relevant community resources, funded projects must have or develop a strong infrastructure of community-based collaboration in delivering the services. This collaboration should recognize and respect individualized care practices and deliver services and program supports in a culturally competent manner. 

The consortium of community-based service providers could include the following entities: child welfare, courts, legal services, substance abuse treatment, mental health, parent support programs, caregiver support programs, in-home visiting, respite care, housing assistance, and quality childcare support. Funded projects may also provide support services to relative caretakers for children of substance-abusing and/or HIV/AIDS-affected mothers, and therapeutic recreational services for young children and families impacted by HIV/AIDS. Projects should demonstrate shared responsibility for case management (e.g., joint social services-medical case management) and integration of case plans for multiple agencies. 

To the extent it is programmatically and geographically possible, projects will be encouraged to coordinate services/treatment options with other relevant CB discretionary grant projects and other Federally or locally funded efforts to serve a similar population. One example is the Regional Partnership Grants (Targeted Grants to Increase the Well-Being of, and to Improve the Permanency Outcomes for, Children Affected by Methamphetamine or Other Substance Abuse) http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/programs_fund/discretionary/2007.htm. Projects will also be expected to coordinate services/treatment options with Ryan White grantees. 

The remainder of this section defines minimal project requirements 

Target Population 

The target population is children and families who have been exposed to a dangerous drug or have been exposed to HIV/AIDs, and/or are at risk of being placed in out-of-home care as a result of the parent(s)’ substance abuse or HIV status.

Coordination 

Funded projects must coordinate with local community-based agencies that provide needed services to the target population. These projects will build on their experience in: 

  1. Coordinating services with community-based agencies in service provision;
  2. Developing cross training and staff development among agencies;
  3. Developing processes for communication and information sharing across those agencies that are serving the same families; and
  4. Developing, sharing, and meeting program outcomes among agencies.                           

Program Strategies and Activities 

Funded projects will conduct activities that increase the well-being, permanency, and enhanced safety of children and their families. These activities must meet ACYF's goals for this grant program. Allowable services and activities are described below:

1. Services and activities for children and youth that address child well-being as it relates to exposure to substance abuse and/or HIV/AIDS and possibly trauma, including:

  • Services to substance exposed newborns to enhance identification, intervention and the coordination/enhancement of services. This could include programs such as home visiting services or referrals and linkages for medical and/or developmental follow-up with pediatric specialists knowledgeable about exposure to drugs and HIV/AIDS.
  • Trauma screening and developmental and functional assessment of child well-being. In infancy and early childhood this would reflect development in four general domains: 1) language development and communication; 2) intellectual ability and cognitive functions; 3) physical development and motor skills; and 4) socio-emotional functioning. In middle childhood, well-being involves the assessment of socio-emotional functioning and general social competence, academic achievement, peer relationships and social skills, a developing sense of identity and the nature of social support. In adolescents, emotional health, social adaptation, academic achievement, and preparation for adult roles and responsibilities are evaluated.
  • Evidence-based or developmentally appropriate approaches to promote child well-being. Approaches would be tailored to the specific needs of the child.
  • Evidence-based and evidence-informed mental health interventions for targeted children. These might include psychological first aide and de-escalation, development of coping strategies, relaxation and self-control strategies, encouragement of expression of feelings, services that address relationship concerns, and other approaches, e.g., evidence-based, trauma-focused interventions (i.e. trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy).
  • Early intervention and preventive services for children and adolescents to provide access to participation in evidence-based programs, and services for children and adolescents.
  • Substance abuse treatment for adolescents in the targeted family, to provide increased capacity to provide developmentally appropriate, trauma-informed treatment services to adolescent family members who, like their parent(s), have a diagnosable substance use disorder. 

2. Substance abuse treatment and HIV/AIDS treatment services for parents and families, including:

  • Timely access to comprehensive evidence-based or evidence-informed substance abuse and/or HIV/AIDS treatment to ensure that the targeted families have access to comprehensive, trauma-informed, substance abuse treatment services (and concurrent mental health services as needed) that meet the needs of the entire family.
  • Use of long-term residential treatment programs where children can live on-site with mothers, and where children's father and/or the mother's partner is served as well (in residence or not). Services are provided for all family members, including the use of individual care plans for the adult and child members of the family.
  • Use of intensive out-patient treatment with or without a housing component (i.e. sober living homes). Services are provided for family members as well, including the use of individual care plans for the adult and child members of the family.
  • Access to medication-assisted treatment, especially for pregnant and post-partum women.
  • Continuing care and recovery support services to support the recovery of parents after treatment, through connections to treatment and community support services such as Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous and case management.
  • To the extent possible, services are provided in a "trauma-informed" environment that acknowledges the trauma experiences of persons with a substance use disorder and/or HIV/AIDS, and the staff is trained to create a safe, non-re-traumatizing environment where services are received. 

3. Services for parents and children that address family functioning, including:

  • Use of evidence-based parenting interventions to promote the parenting capacities of parents impacted by substance abuse and/or HIV/AIDS.
  • Use of evidence-based interventions to address relational problems and concerns including such programs as Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, Brief Strategic Family Therapy, Familias Unidas, Child Parent Psychotherapy, and others.
  • Training for foster parents, relatives, and other substitute caretakers about the special needs of children and youth who have suffered from abuse or neglect and whose parents have a substance use disorder. For example, training might focus on the support of caretakers who are caring for children whose parents are abusing drugs.
  • Use of family interventions to strengthen family functioning and assist with reunification of families when children have been in out-of-home placements, such as Multi-Systemic Family Therapy, Functional Family Therapy, and others.
  • Ancillary services for families to provide assistance in securing needed services such as safe and drug-free housing, safe-housing for those with HIV/AIDS and transportation and child care. 

Using Evidence-Based Practices  

Projects may use an evidenced-based practice that is appropriate for the targeted population. An evidence-based practice, also called EBP, refers to approaches that are validated by some form of documented research evidence. Grantees should select EBPs at the highest level of evidence whenever possible for the specified target population. Screening and assessment tools to be used in these projects should be consistent and aligned with the EBP chosen. Measurable indicators and outcomes should be consistent with the outcomes previously obtained with the selected EBP. In some instances, grantees may wish to test an EBP for a specific set of indicators and outcomes not previously identified in the literature; a clear rationale and evaluation plan should be articulated by they grantee.

CB recognizes that EBPs have not been developed for all populations and/or service settings. For example, certain interventions for American Indians/Alaska Natives, rural or isolated communities, or recent immigrant communities may not have been formally evaluated and, therefore, have a limited or nonexistent evidence base. In addition, other interventions that have an established evidence base for certain populations or in certain settings may not have been formally evaluated with other sub-populations or within other settings. Projects that serve a population with an intervention that has not been formally evaluated with that population must build on other forms of evidence that the practice(s) they implement are appropriate for the targeted population. Evidence for these practices may include unpublished studies, preliminary evaluation results, clinical (or other professional association) guidelines, findings from focus groups with community members, or the project's experience with the population of focus or managing similar programs. Projects should also note the costs of using an evidence-based practice and the costs to train staff in the use of the instruments and in maintaining fidelity to the selected EBP.

Note: For additional instructions for applicants, see Section IV.2, The Project Description

Resources for Evidence-Based Practices 

Resources on effective and promising EBPs and Evidence-Informed Practices (EIPs) can be found through:

Evaluation 

NOTE: See Section IV.2 The Project Description/Evaluation for additional instructions for applicants. 

Grantees will implement a rigorous evaluation in order to determine their project’s effectiveness in improving the well-being, permanency, and safety of infants and young children affected by parental substance abuse or HIV/AIDS, as well as determining the extent to which measurable improvements are accomplished in parental substance use, parenting capacities, and child social and emotional functioning. Experimental designs involving random assignment to treatment and control groups are the preferred, but not the only, method for determining the intervention impacts. Projects may use another type of evaluation research design if that design is the most rigorous design possible for addressing the outcomes. 

Where applicable, project evaluations must include an appropriate comparison group for determining the influence of the project activities on outcomes. The comparison group and the program/treatment group are assigned at random or matched on key characteristics. If not assigned at random or matched on key characteristics, there must be a reasonable explanation of how pre-existing differences between the comparison group and treatment group are addressed. Research designs that include a comparison group, particularly a contemporaneous comparison group (that is, with data on the comparison clients for the same time period as the intervention group), are strongly preferred. 

If applicable, projects must secure informed consent and implement an Institutional Review Board (IRB) review. General information about the HHS Protection of Human Subjects regulations can be obtained at http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/, or by contacting Office of Human Research Protections (OHRP) by email at ohrp@csophs.dhhs.gov or by phone at 240-453-6900. 

Projects funded under this FOA must collect descriptive data on characteristics of individuals and families served, types and nature of needs identified and met, and the services provided. Reliable and valid measures should be used to assess improvements in child development and well-being, parenting capacities, and parent/child interaction. Information on program costs and service utilization is to be collected along with any other such information as may be required by CB.

CB will expect grantees to engage in an evaluation of sufficient rigor to demonstrate potential linkages between project activities and improved outcomes. Guided by a logic model for the project, this evaluation will include both process and outcome evaluation components. The process evaluation will assess the implementation of the project, as well as the linkages between the collaborative partners that will help ensure that the identified needs of children and families are met. CB is interested in the factors and strategies associated with successful partnerships and collaborative efforts, and the potential for sustainability of work undertaken through community-based collaborations and partnerships. Data from this evaluation are expected to inform programmatic improvements or adjustments, as well as expand the knowledge base on what may be potentially effective strategies for maintaining or strengthening family stability among substance-abusing and/or HIV/AIDS-affected families. 

The outcome component will use a sufficiently rigorous approach to examine how the approaches used in this demonstration project affect key stated outcomes. The evidence from the evaluation will support evidence-based practice, if selected by the applicant, and provide examples of strategies that are tied to positive outcomes for children and families. Evaluations should include use of analytic method(s) for determining the effectiveness of the strategies and descriptions and assessments of the data collected. Both qualitative and quantitative methods are required. Evaluation results must report relevant outputs and outcomes that appropriately reflect the consequences of the project activities. 

If projects do not have the in-house capacity to conduct an objective evaluation of the project, CB encourages projects to contract with a third-party evaluator specializing in social science or evaluation to conduct the evaluation. It is important that the evaluator has the necessary independence from the project to ensure objectivity. A skilled evaluator can help develop a logic model and assist in designing an evaluation strategy that is appropriate given the goals and objectives of the proposed project. Additional assistance may be found in the Program Manager's Guide to Evaluation. A copy of this document can be accessed at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/other_resrch/pm_guide_eval/index.html

Projects will also participate in cross-site evaluation activities, and must submit descriptive data on the clients served and the services provided to the National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center annually. The Resource Center collaborates with the University of Missouri-Kansas City, Institute for Human Development on the AIA cross-site evaluation effort. Time-frames for the submission of data on outcome measures will be negotiated within 6 months after grant award. Additional information on the cross site evaluation can be found at http://aia.berkeley.edu/aia-projects/cross-site-evaluation/. 

Logic Model

Funded projects must be based on a logic model. A logic model is a tool that presents the conceptual framework for a proposed project and explains the linkages among program elements. While there are many versions of the logic model, they generally summarize the logical connections among the needs that are the focus of the project, project goals and objectives, the target population, project inputs (resources), project activities/processes/outputs directed toward the target population, the expected short- and long-term outcomes the initiative is designed to achieve, and the evaluation plan for measuring the extent to which proposed processes and outcomes actually occur.

Demonstration Projects 

Activities funded under this FOA are demonstration projects. At CB, a demonstration project is one that puts into place and tests new, unique, or distinctive approaches for delivering services to a specific population.

Demonstration projects may test whether a program or service that has proven successful in one location or setting can work in a different context. Demonstration projects may test a theory, idea, or method that reflects a new and different way of thinking about service delivery. Demonstration projects may be designed to address the needs of a very specific group of clients or focus on one service component available to all clients. The scope of these projects may be broad and comprehensive, or narrow and targeted to specific populations. A demonstration project must:

  • Develop and implement an evidence-based or evidence-informed model, if proposed, with specific components or strategies that are based on theory, research, or evaluation data; or replicate or test the transferability of successfully evaluated program models;
  • Determine the effectiveness, costs, and benefits of the model and its components or strategies using a rigorous evaluation approach;
  • Disseminate strategically and effectively; collaborate with other projects in the grant cluster to establish goals, identify and engage with target audiences; produce detailed procedures, materials, and other products based on the programs evaluations; and disseminate information about project activities, products, and findings; and
  • Contribute to the evidence base on strategies, practices, and programs that may be used to guide replication, program improvements, systems change, or testing in other settings.  

Dissemination 

CB expects that information and knowledge generated by these projects will be shared with the field and efforts will be made to integrate project knowledge into policy and practice. Grantees will be expected to disseminate strategically and effectively, so their project information and knowledge is received by key target audiences and used as intended to achieve identified dissemination goals. Projects will disseminate their individual project products and findings and work with the other projects in this grant cluster to disseminate cross-cluster products and findings. Projects will disseminate at appropriate times. They will evaluate the extent to which their target audiences have received project knowledge and used it as intended, and assess the impact of dissemination. They will allocate sufficient staff time and budget for dissemination.

Grantees will be expected to work throughout the course of their projects with Federal Project Officers, the CB T/TA Network, and other projects in this grant cluster to:

  • Finalize individual and cluster-wide dissemination goals, objectives, and strategic plan;
  • Identify and engage with target audiences for dissemination;
  • Produce detailed procedures, materials, and other products based on the program evaluation and the needs of identified target audiences;
  • Develop and disseminate summarized/synthesized information about the project; and
  • Evaluate their dissemination processes and outcomes. 

Additional Project Requirements 

See Section IV.2 Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications.

II. Award Information
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Estimated Total Funding: $3,800,000
Expected Number of Awards: 8
Award Ceiling: $475,000 Per Budget Period
Award Floor: $200,000 Per Budget Period
Average Projected Award Amount: $475,000 Per Budget Period

Length of Project Periods:

36-month project with three 12-month budget periods

Additional Information on Awards:

Awards made under this announcement are subject to the availability of federal funds.

Applications requesting an award amount that exceeds the Award Ceiling per budget period or per project period, as stated in this section, will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement. This disqualification applies only to the Award Ceiling listed for the first 12-month budget period for projects with multiple budget periods. If the project and budget period are the same, the disqualification applies to the Award Ceiling listed for the project period. Please see Section III.3. Application Disqualification Factors.

Note: For those programs that require matching or cost sharing, grantees will be held accountable for projected commitments of non-federal resources in their application budgets and budget justifications by budget period or by project period for fully funded awards, even if the projected commitment exceeds the required amount of match or cost share. A grantee’s failure to provide the required matching amount may result in the disallowance of federal funds.

The initial award will be for a 12-month budget period. The award of continuation beyond each 12-month budget period will be subject to the availability of funds, satisfactory progress on the part of the grantee, and a determination that continued funding would be in the best interest of the Federal Government. The projects awarded will be for a project period of 36 months.

Please see Section IV.5 Funding Restrictions for limitations on the use of federal funds awarded under this announcement.

III. Eligibility Information
III.1. Eligible Applicants
  • State governments
  • County governments
  • City or township governments
  • Special district governments
  • Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
  • Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
  • Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
  • Nonprofits without 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
  • Private institutions of higher education
  • Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)

Public and nonprofit private entities, including those listed above, are eligible to apply.

Collaborative and interdisciplinary efforts are encouraged, but applications must identify a primary applicant responsible for administering the grant.

Individuals, foreign entities, and sole proprietorship organizations are not eligible to compete for, or receive, awards under this announcement. See Section III.3. Other.

Faith-based and community organizations that meet eligibility requirements are eligible to receive awards under this funding opportunity announcement.
See "Legal Status of Applicant Entity" in Section IV.2 for documentation required to support eligibility.
 
III.2. Cost Sharing or Matching
Cost Sharing / Matching Requirement: No
 
III.3. Other

DUNS Number and System for Award Management Eligibility Requirements (SAM.gov)


All applicants must have a DUNS number (www.dnb.com) and be registered with the System for Award Management (SAM, www.sam.gov) and maintain an active SAM registration until the application process is complete, and should a grant be made, throughout the life of the award. Finalize a new, or renew an existing, registration at least two weeks before the application deadline. This action should allow you time to resolve any issues that may arise. Failure to comply with these requirements may result in your inability to submit your application or receive an award. Maintain documentation (with dates) of your efforts to register or renew at least two weeks before the deadline. See the SAM Quick Guide for Grantees at: https:// www.sam.gov /sam /transcript /SAM_Quick_Guide_Grants_Registrations-v1.6.pdf.

HHS requires all entities that plan to apply for, and ultimately receive, federal grant funds from any HHS Agency, or receive subawards directly from recipients of those grant funds to:   

  • Be registered in the SAM prior to submitting an application or plan;
  • Maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which it has an active award or an application or plan under consideration by an OPDIV; and
  • Provide its active DUNS number in each application or plan it submits to the OPDIV.

ACF is prohibited from making an award until an applicant has complied with these requirements.  At the time an award is ready to be made, if the intended recipient has not complied with these requirements, ACF:   

  • May determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive an award; and
  • May use that determination as a basis for making an award to another applicant.

APPLICATION DISQUALIFICATION FACTORS


Applications from individuals, foreign entities, or sole proprietorship organizations will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

Award Ceiling Disqualification

Applications that request an award amount exceeding the Award Ceiling per budget period, or per project period, as stated in Section II. Award Information, will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement. This disqualification applies only to the Award Ceiling listed for first 12-month budget period for projects with multiple budget periods. If the project and budget period are the same, the disqualification applies to the Award Ceiling listed for the project period.

Application Submission Disqualifications

ACF requires electronic submission of applications at www.Grants.govApplicants that do not have an Internet connection or sufficient computing capacity to upload large documents to the Internet may contact ACF for an exemption that will allow these applicants to submit an application in paper format. Information on requesting an exemption from electronic application submission is found in Section IV.2. Application Submission Options.

The deadline for electronic application submission is 11:59 p.m., ET, on the due date listed in the Overview and in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times. Electronic applications submitted to www.Grants.gov after 11:59 p.m., ET, on the due date, as indicated by a dated and time-stamped email from www.Grants.gov, will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement. That is, applications submitted to www.Grants.gov, on or after 12:00 a.m., ET, on the day after the due date will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

Applications submitted to www.Grants.gov at any time during the open application period, and prior to the due date and time, which fail the Grants.gov validation check, will not be received at or acknowledged by ACF.

Each time an application is submitted via www.Grants.gov, the application will receive a new date and time-stamp email. Only those applications with on-time date and time stamps that result in a validated application, which is transmitted to ACF, will be acknowledged.

The deadline for receipt of paper applications is 4:30 p.m., ET, on the due date listed in the
Overview and in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times. Paper applications received after 4:30 p.m., ET, on the due date will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.  Paper applications received from applicants that have not received approval of an exemption from required electronic submission will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement. See "Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission" in Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission.

Applications that are disqualified under any of these circumstances will receive written notification by letter or by email.

 

IV. Application and Submission Information

IV.1. Address to Request Application Package

CB Operations Center
c/o Lux Consulting Group
8405 Colesville Road, Suite 600
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (866) 796-1591
Email: cb@luxcg.com


Electronic Application Submission:
The electronic application submission package is available at www.Grants.gov.

Applications in Paper Format:
For applicants that have received an exemption to submit applications in paper format, Standard Forms, assurances, and certifications are available at the ACF Funding Opportunities Forms webpage at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants-forms. See Section IV.2.Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission if applicants do not have an Internet connection or sufficient computing capacity to upload large documents (files) to www.Grants.gov.

Standard Forms that are compliant with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. § 794d): Available at the Grants.gov Forms Repository website and at http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants_forms.

Federal Relay Service:
Hearing-impaired and speech-impaired callers may contact the Federal Relay Service for assistance at 1-800-877-8339 (TTY - Text Telephone or ASCII - American Standard Code For Information Interchange).

IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission

Section IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission

FORMATTING ACF APPLICATIONS


FOR ALL ACF APPLICATIONS:

Authorized Organizational Representative (AOR)

The AOR is an individual(s), named by the applicant/recipient organization, who is authorized to act for the applicant/recipient and to assume the obligations imposed by the federal laws, regulations, requirements, and conditions that apply to grant applications or awards.  Each applicant must designate an AOR.

AOR authorization is part of the registration process at www.Grants.gov, where the AOR will create a short profile and obtain a username and password from the Grants.gov Credential Provider. AORs will only be authorized for the DUNS number registered in the System for Award Management (SAM).

Point of Contact

In addition to the AOR, a point of contact on matters involving the application must also be identified. The point of contact, known as the Project Director or Principal Investigator, should not be identical to the person identified as the AOR. The point of contact must be available to answer any questions pertaining to the application.

Application Checklist

Applicants may refer to Section VIII. Other Information for a checklist of application requirements that may be used in developing and organizing application materials. Details concerning acknowledgment of received applications are available in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times of this announcement.

Follow the instructions provided in this application formatting section to ensure that your application does not exceeded the page limitations and can be printed efficiently and consistently for the competitive review.

Accepted Font Styles:

All applicants must use 12-point font in Times New Roman (TNR).

Page Limitations for Application Submissions

Applicants must observe the page limitations listed later in this section. Page limitations do not include OMB-approved Standard Forms (SFs) and OMB-approved forms

All applications must be double-spaced and in Times New Roman, 12-point font.  An application that exceeds the cited page limitation for double-spaced pages in the Project Description file or the Appendices file will have the extra pages removed and these pages will not be reviewed.

Page limitations apply to electronically submitted and paper format applications. For applications that are single-spaced and/or one-and-a-half spaced (in whole or in part, except for the exempted elements listed later in this section) and/or use a font smaller than TNR, 12-point, ACF will use a formula to determine the actual number of pages. The formula counts the number of characters an applicant uses when following the instructions and using 12-point TNR and then compares the resulting number with that of the submitted application. For example, an applicant using TNR, 11-point font, with 1-inch margins all around, and single-spacing, would have an additional 26 lines, or 1500 characters, which is equal to 4/5 of an additional page. Extra pages resulting from this formula will be removed and will not be reviewed.

Be sure to print the Project Description and Appendices documents on paper and count the number of pages for each file before submission. Keep the printed copy as a hard copy of your application for your files.

Copies Required

Applicants must submit one complete copy of the application package electronically. Applicants submitting electronic applications need not provide additional copies of their application package.

Applicants submitting applications in paper format must submit one original and two copies of the complete application, including all Standard Forms and OMB-approved forms. The original copy must have original signatures.

Signatures

Applicants submitting electronic applications must follow the AOR Authorization and E-Biz POC instructions provided at www.Grants.gov.

The original of a paper format application must include original signatures.

Accepted Application Format

With the exception of the required Standard Forms and OMB-approved forms, all application materials must be formatted so that they will print out onto 8 ½" x 11" white paper with 1-inch margins all around. The Project Description and Appendices files must be numbered separately. The font size on any scanned documents must be large enough so that it is readable. Do not scan more than one page of a document on a single page. Application pages with two or more pages of a document scanned to it will be removed and will not be reviewed.

Elements Exempted from Double-Spacing Requirements

The following elements of the application submission are exempt from the double-spacing requirements listed earlier in this section: the one-page Project Summary/Abstract, required Assurances and Certifications, required Standard Forms, required OMB-approved forms, resumes, logic models, proof of legal status/non-profit status, contracts, and the Budget Justification. These items may be single-spaced. The Project Summary/Abstract is required to be one single-spaced page in 12-point font with 1-inch margins.  The Budget Justification may be single-spaced but must be in 12-point font.  Resumes must be in 12-point font, but are not required to be double-spaced. The font size on any scanned documents must be large enough so that it is readable.

ELECTRONIC APPLICATION SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

Applicants are required to submit their applications electronically unless they have requested and received an exemption that will allow submission in paper format. See Section IV.2. Application Submission Options for information about requesting an exemption.

Electronic applications will only be accepted via www.Grants.gov. ACF will not accept applications submitted via email or via facsimile.

Application Upload Requirements

Each applicant is required to upload ONLY two electronic files, excluding Standard Forms and OMB-approved forms. No more than two files will be accepted for the review, and additional files will be removed.  Standard Forms and OMB-approved forms will not be considered additional files.   

ACF strongly recommends that electronic applications be uploaded as Portable Document Files (PDFs). One file must contain the entire Project Description and Budget Justification; the other file must contain all documents required in the Appendices. Details on the content of each of the two files, as well as page limitations for each, are listed later in this section.

To adhere to the two file requirement, applicants may need to convert and/or merge documents together using a PDF converter software. Many recent versions of Microsoft Office include the ability to save documents to the PDF format without need of additional software. Applicants using the Adobe Professional software suite will be able to merge these documents together.  ACF recommends merging documents electronically rather than scanning multiple documents into one document manually, as scanned documents may have reduced clarity and readability.    

However, ACF understands that all applicants may not have access to this software. Grants.gov offers a listing of several free PDF conversion programs. These programs can be found on Grants.gov by clicking on ‘Applicant Resources’ on the far left side of the home page, and then by following the link to ‘Download Software’ near the top of the screen, or by clicking HERE . Free PDF software is available on this page that will allow users to convert and merge PDF documents. As an example, ACF is providing written instructions on downloading and using one type of free software listed at Grants.gov at the following link: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/assets/pdf995_instructions_for_video.pdf.  A video demonstrating this process is also available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOly0HwXPsA. ACF does not endorse any of the software listed on Grants.gov, and applicants are not required to use a specific type of PDF conversion software to submit an application.    

NOTE: Applications submitted via www.Grants.gov will undergo a validation check. See Section IV.2. Application Submission Options for more information. The validation check can affect whether the application is accepted for review. If an application fails the Grants.gov validation check and is not resubmitted by 11:59 p.m., ET, on the due date, it will not be transmitted to ACF and will be excluded from the review. If an applicant resubmits their application to Grants.gov by 11:59 p.m., ET, on the due date and the application does not pass the validation check, it will not be transmitted to ACF and will be excluded from the review.

Required Standard Forms (SFs) and OMB-approved Forms

Standard Forms (SFs) and OMB-approved forms, such as the SF-424 application and budget forms and the SF-P/PSL (Project/Performance Site Location), are uploaded separately at Grants.gov. These forms are submitted separately from the Project Description and Appendices files. See Section IV.2. Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications for the listing of required Standard Forms, OMB-approved forms, and required assurances and certifications.

Carefully observe the file naming conventions required by www.Grants.gov
Limit file names to 50 characters and do not use special characters (example: &,-,*,%,/,#) including periods (.), blank spaces, and accent marks, within application form fields, and file attachment names. An underscore (_) may be used to separate a file name.

Use only file formats supported by ACF
It is critical that applicants submit applications using only the supported file formats listed here. While ACF supports all of the following file formats, we strongly recommend that the two application submission files (Project Description and Appendices) are uploaded as PDF documents in order to comply with the two file upload limitation. Documents in file formats that are not supported by ACF will be removed from the application and will not be used in the competitive review. This may make the application incomplete and ACF will not make any awards based on an incomplete application.

ACF supports the following file formats:

  • Adobe PDF – Portable Document Format (.pdf)
  • Microsoft Word (.doc or .docx)
  • Microsoft Excel (.xls or .xlsx)
  • Microsoft PowerPoint (.ppt)
  • Corel WordPerfect (.wpd)
  • Image Formats (.JPG, .GIF, .TIFF, or .BMP only)

Do Not Encrypt or Password-Protect the Electronic Application Files

If ACF cannot access submitted electronic files because they are encrypted or password protected, the affected file will be removed from the application and will not be reviewed. This removal may make the application incomplete and ACF will not make awards based on an incomplete application.

FORMATTING FOR PAPER APPLICATION SUBMISSIONS:

The following requirements are only applicable to applications submitted in paper format. Applicants must receive an exemption from ACF in order for a paper format application to be accepted for review. See Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission later in this section under Application Submission Options for more information. 

Signatures

An original signature of the AOR is required only on the original copy of paper format application submissions. A point of contact on matters involving the application must be identified on the SF-424 at item 8f. The point of contact, known as the Project Director or Principal Investigator, should not be identical to the person identified as the AOR.

Format Requirements for Paper Applications

All application materials must be submitted on 8 ½" x 11" white paper with 1-inch margins. Applications must be in two sections. The first section must contain the entire Project Description and Budget Justification, and the second section must contain all required Appendices. The pages of the two sections must be separately and sequentially numbered.

All copies of mailed or hand-delivered paper applications must be submitted in a single package. If an applicant is submitting multiple applications under a single FOA, or multiple applications under separate FOAs, each application submission must be packaged separately. The package(s) must be clearly labeled for the specific FOA it addresses by FOA title and by Funding Opportunity Number (FON).

Because each application will be duplicated, do not use or include separate covers, binders, clips, tabs, plastic inserts, maps, brochures, or any other items that cannot be processed easily on a photocopy machine with an automatic feed. Do not bind, clip, staple, or fasten in any way separate sections of the application. Applicants are advised that the copies of the application submitted, not the original, will be reproduced by the federal government for review. All application materials must be one-sided for duplication purposes.

Instructions on the order of assembly for paper application submissions are available later in this formatting section.

Addresses for Submission of Paper Applications

See Section IV.6. Other Submission Requirements for addresses for paper format application submissions.

Page Limitations and Content of the Application for All Submission Formats:

NOTE: ADDITIONAL CB-SPECIFIC INSTRUCTIONS FOR ALL APPLICATIONS UNDER THIS FOA

 The Project Description file is limited to 75 pages and must include these items in this order:

  1. Table of Contents
  2. Abstract
  3. Objectives and Need for Assistance
  4. Approach
  5. Evaluation
  6. Organizational Capacity 
  7. Logic Model  
  8. Line Item Budget and Budget Justification                                                                        

The Appendices file is limited to 50 pages and must include these items in this order:

  1. Certifications and Assurances
  2. Proof of Legal Status (if applicable)
  3. Third-party agreements
  4. Staff and Position Data (e.g., resumes, job descriptions, organizational charts)
  5. Indirect Cost Rate Letter (if applicable)

Do not include Standard Forms or OMB-approved forms as part of the Project Description file or the Appendices file. For electronic applicants, Standard Forms are submitted separately at Grants.gov. Standard Forms and OMB-approved forms are not included in the page limitations.

Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications

Applicants seeking grant or cooperative agreement awards under this announcement must submit the listed Standard Forms (SFs), assurances, and certifications with the application. All required Standard Forms, assurances, and certifications are available at ACF Funding Opportunities Forms or at the Grants.gov Forms Repository unless specified otherwise.

 
Forms / Assurances / Certifications Submission Requirement Notes / Description

SF-424 - Application for Federal Assistance

and

SF-P/PSL - Project/Performance Site Location(s)

Submission is required for all applicants by the application due date.

Required for all applications.

SF-424A - Budget Information - Non-Construction Programs

and

SF-424B - Assurances - Non-Construction Programs

Submission is required for all applicants when applying for a non-construction project. Standard Forms must be used.  Forms must be submitted by the application due date.

Required for all applications when applying for a non-construction project. By signing and submitting the SF-424B, applicants are making the appropriate certification of their compliance with all federal statutes relating to nondiscrimination.

Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants

Submission is voluntary.
Submission may be made with the application by the application due date listed in the Overview
and Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times.  Or, it may be submitted prior to the award of a grant.

Non-profit private organizations (not including private universities) are encouraged to submit the survey with their applications. Submission of the survey is voluntary.  Applicants applying electronically may submit the survey along with the application as part of an appendix or as a separate document.  Hard copy submissions should include the survey in a separate envelope.

Certification Regarding Lobbying

Submission required of all applicants with the application package.  If it is not submitted with the application package, it may also be submitted prior to the award of a grant.

Submission of this Certification is required for all applications.

SF-LLL - Disclosure of Lobbying Activities

If applicable, submission of this form is due at the time of application. 

If any funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a member of Congress in connection with this commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan, the applicant shall complete and submit the SF-LLL, "Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying," in accordance with its instructions.

DUNS Number (Universal Identifier) and Systems for Award Management (SAM) registration..

A DUNS number is required of all applicants. To obtain a DUNS number, go to 

http:// fedgov.dnb. com/ webform

Active registration at the Systems Award Management (SAM) website must be maintained throughout the application and project award period. SAM registration is available at 

http://www.sam.gov.

A DUNS number and SAM registration are eligibility requirements for all applicants.

See Section III.3. Other for information on obtaining a DUNS number and registration

at http://www.sam.gov.



NOTE: ADDITIONAL CB-SPECIFIC PROJECT REQUIREMENTS OF ALL APPLICANTS UNDER THIS FOA

The applicant's signature on the application constitutes its assurance that it will comply with the following requirements:

  1. As required by sections 101 (b) through (d) of the Abandoned Infants Assistance Act:
    • Give priority to abandoned infants and young children who are infected with, or have been perinatally exposed to, the human immunodeficiency virus, or have a life-threatening illness or other special medical need; or have been perinatally exposed to a dangerous drug.
    • If programs provide care to infants and young children in foster homes or in other residential non-medical settings away from their parents, assure that for each infant and young child, a case plan (as described in paragraph 1 of section 475 of the Social Security Act [42 U.S.C. 675(1)]) and a case review system (of the type described in paragraph (5) of such section) are in place, to the extent that the infants and young children are not otherwise covered by such a plan or system.
    • Use the funds provided under this FOA only for the purposes specified in the application submitted to and approved by the Secretary.
    • Establish fiscal control and accounting procedures to ensure proper disbursement and accounting of Federal funds.
  2. Have the project fully functioning as described in applicant’s timeline, within 90 days following the notification of the award.
  3. Participate if CB chooses to do a cross-site evaluation or a technical assistance contract that relates to this funding opportunity announcement.
  4. Allocate sufficient funds in the budget to support required travel:  a) Within 3 months after the award, the project director, child welfare liaison (if different from the project director), evaluator and/or other key staff must attend a 2- to 3-day kick-off meeting in Washington, D.C. ; and b) The project director, the child welfare agency liaison (if different from the project director) and the evaluator and/or other key staff must attend the annual grantee meeting, usually held in the spring, in Washington, D.C.
  5. Submit all performance indicator data, program, evaluation, and financial reports in a timely manner (see Section VI.3), in the recommended formats (to be provided). CB prefers and will accept the interim and final reports and attachments on disk or electronically using a standard word-processing program; however, projects are required to provide the original and two copies of performance progress and final reports.
  6. CB reserves the right to secure and distribute grantee products and materials, including copies of journal articles written by grantees about their grant projects.
  7. Submit an original and two copies of the final program/evaluation report and any program products to CB within 90 days of the project end date.
  8. If applicable: archive data from the program evaluation with the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect within 90 days of the termination of Federal funding for the project. The applicant's IRB and research participants should be made aware that the data from the project will be archived and made available to other researchers after personal identifiers have been removed. Archiving will involve providing individual respondent data in electronic form and the accompanying documentation, including the codebook, the final report, and copies of the research instruments, as appropriate. A manual describing the guidelines of the Archive, Depositing Data with the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect: A Handbook for Contributors, is available from the Archive directly at the Family Life Development Center, MVR Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (phone: (607) 255-7799), from the Archive  website at http://www.ndacan.cornell.edu
  9. All grantee materials, products, publications, news releases, etc. will include this notice-

Funded through the Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Children's Bureau, Grant #______ .The contents of this publication do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the funders, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This information is in the public domain. Readers are encouraged to copy and share it, but please credit ___________ .

 

Non-Federal Reviewers

Since ACF will be using non-federal reviewers in the review process, applicants have the option of omitting from the application copies (not the original) specific salary rates or amounts for individuals specified in the application budget as well as Social Security Numbers, if otherwise required for individuals. The copies may include summary salary information.If applicants are submitting their application electronically, ACF will omit the same specific salary rate information from copies made for use during the review and selection process.
IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission (contd.)

The Project Description

Part I: The Project Description Overview

Purpose

The project description provides the majority of information by which an application is evaluated and ranked in competition with other applications for available assistance.  It should address the activity for which federal funds are being requested, and should be consistent with the goals and objectives of the program as described in Section I. Funding Opportunity Description.  Supporting documents should be included where they can present information clearly and succinctly.  When appropriate, applicants should cite the evaluation criteria that are relevant to specific components of their project description.   Awarding offices use this and other information in making their funding recommendations.  It is important, therefore, that this information be included in the application in a manner that is clear and complete.

General Expectations and Instructions

Applicants should develop project descriptions that focus on outcomes and convey strategies for achieving intended performance. Project descriptions are evaluated on the basis of substance and measurable outcomes, not length. Extensive exhibits are not required. Cross-referencing should be used rather than repetition. Supporting information concerning activities that will not be directly funded by the grant or information that does not directly pertain to an integral part of the grant-funded activity should be placed in an appendix.

Part II: General Instructions for Preparing a Full Project Description

Introduction

Applicants must prepare the project description statement in accordance with the following instructions while being aware of the specified evaluation criteria in Section V.1. Criteria.  The text options give a broad overview of what the project description should include while the evaluation criteria identify the measures that will be used to evaluate applications.

Table of Contents

List the contents of the application including corresponding page numbers. The table of contents must be single spaced and will be counted against the total page limitations.

Project Summary/Abstract

Provide a summary of the application’s project description. The summary must be clear, accurate, concise, and without reference to other parts of the application. The abstract must include a brief description of the proposed grant project including the needs to be addressed, the proposed services, and the population group(s) to be served. 

 Please place the following at the top of the abstract: 

  • Project Title
  • Applicant Name
  • Address
  • Contact Phone Numbers (Voice, Fax)
  • E-Mail Address
  • Web Site Address, if applicable 

The project abstract must be single-spaced, in Times New Roman 12-point font, and limited to one page in length. Additional pages will be removed and will not be reviewed.


Objectives And Need For Assistance

Clearly identify the physical, economic, social, financial, institutional, and/or other problem(s) requiring a solution.  The need for assistance including the nature and scope of the problem must be demonstrated, and the principal and subordinate objectives of the project must be clearly and concisely stated; supporting documentation, such as letters of support and testimonials from concerned interests other than the applicant, may be included.  Any relevant data based on planning studies should be included or referred to in the endnotes/footnotes.  Incorporate demographic data and participant/beneficiary information, as well as data describing the needs of the target population and the proposed service area as needed. When appropriate, a literature review should be used to support the objectives and needs described in this section.

Approach

Outline a plan of action that describes the scope and detail of how the proposed project will be accomplished.  Applicants must account for all functions or activities identified in the application. Describe any design or technological innovations, reductions in cost or time, or extraordinary social and/or community involvement in the project. Provide a list of organizations, cooperating entities, consultants, or other key individuals that will work on the project, along with a short description of the nature of their effort or contribution.

 Cite potential obstacles and challenges to accomplishing project goals and explain strategies that will be used to address these challenges.

NOTE: CB-SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS OF ALL APPLICANTS UNDER THIS FOA

Applicants must clearly describe the target population and the geographic area to be served, present analyses of local data that illustrate the characteristics and needs of the population to be served, and explain how the proposed approach will improve outcomes for those infants, children and families. Data may be obtained from the relevant State or local agency that gathers data on substance abuse and HIV/AIDS. Applicants must document the types of adults, children, and families to be served, including how they will be identified and recruited for services and an initial projection of the number of clients to be served. Applicants must describe how they will give priority to abandoned infants and young children who are infected with, or have been perinatally exposed to, the human immunodeficiency virus, or have been perinatally exposed to a dangerous drug, and how other medically fragile children who are abandoned or at risk of abandonment can be served. Applicants must justify the appropriateness of their proposed work for the target population. Applications must include:

  • Clear presentation of analysis of local data describing the proposed target population and their families, and their needs;
  • Strong rational and sound justification for the proposed service structure and array of services proposed;
  • Strong rationale and sound justification for the screening and assessment tools proposed;
  • Convincing linkages between the proposed work and the needs of the target population;
  • Description of roles and evidence of commitment from the consortium of community-based providers, partner agencies, and organizations participating in the proposed work; and
  • Evidence that the proposed project will increase the well-being and permanency outcomes among the target population. 

Allowable services and activities are listed in Section I. Project Description, Program Strategies and Activities. Applicants must propose specific activities to increase the well-being, permanency and enhanced safety of children and their families. Applicants must explain how the practices chosen meet ACYF's goals for this grant program. 

If the proposed project plans to implement an evidenced-based practice, the applicant must document that this practice has a demonstrated evidence base and that it is appropriate for the targeted population. If the applicant proposes use of an EBP, the applicant must:

  1. Identify the evidence-based practice(s) it proposes to implement for the targeted population;
  2. Identify and discuss the evidence that shows that the practice(s) is (are) effective;
  3. If proposing to use more than one evidence-based practice, clearly identify which service modality and population of focus each practice will support;
  4. Discuss the population(s) for which the practice(s) has (have) been shown to be effective and show that it (they) is (are) appropriate for the population(s) of focus. 
  5. Discuss the alignment of the screening and assessment tools to be used, as well as the outcomes previously accomplished (in the literature) and anticipated in this project from the use of the selected EBPs.
  6. If there are evidence-based strategies available for one or more component of its program and the applicant chooses not to use an evidence-based strategy, the applicant must provide a strong justification for why a non-EBP was chosen. 

Applicants must provide information on research studies to show that the services/practices they plan to implement are evidence-based. This information is usually published in research journals. If this type of information is not available, applicants may provide information from other sources, such as unpublished studies or documents describing formal consensus among recognized experts. 

Applicants proposing to serve a population with an intervention that has not been formally evaluated with that population are required to provide other forms of evidence that the practice(s) they propose is appropriate for the targeted population. Evidence for these practices may include unpublished studies, preliminary evaluation results, clinical (or other professional association) guidelines, and/or findings from focus groups with community members. Applicants may describe their experience either with the population of focus or in managing similar programs. In selecting non EBPs, applicants must:

  1. Document the evidence that the practice(s) chosen is/are appropriate for the proposed outcomes;
  2. Explain how the practice chosen meets ACYF's goals for this grant program;
  3. Describe any modifications/adaptations that will be needed to make the proposed practice(s) meet the goals of the proposed project and provide evidence that the changes will improve the outcomes. CB expects that projects will implement their evidence-based service(s)/practice(s) in a way that maintains fidelity to the original service(s)/practice(s). However, CB understands that projects may need to make minor changes to the service(s)/practice(s) to meet the needs of their population of focus or their program, or to allow projects to use resources more efficiently. Applicants must describe any changes to the proposed service(s)/practice(s) that they believe are necessary for these purposes and provide documentation that they have worked closely with the original model developer regarding any proposed adaptation. Applicants may describe their own experience either with the population of focus or in managing similar programs. However, applicants will need to provide evidence that the proposed changes are justified.
  4. If applicable, applicants must justify the use of multiple evidence-based practices. Applicants must show in the required logic model and related narrative how use of multiple evidence-based practices will be integrated into the program, while maintaining an appropriate level of fidelity for each practice. Applicants must describe how the effectiveness of each evidence-based practice will be quantified in the performance assessment of the project; and
  5. Applicants must include a plan to provide training needed to successfully implement the proposed evidence-based practice(s).
 

Applicants must propose a plan to coordinate with local community-based agencies that will provide needed services to the target population. Applicants must document experience in: 

  1. Coordinating services with community-based agencies in service provision;
  2. Developing cross training and staff development among agencies;
  3. Developing processes for communication and information sharing across agencies; and
  4. Developing, sharing and meeting program outcomes among agencies.   

Applicants should describe a current or previous coordination activity that describes the coordinated effort and the agreed upon outcomes. 

Applicants that are located in States that have developed and implemented procedures for expedited termination of parental rights and placement for adoption of infants determined to be abandoned under State law should include documentation confirming this.

Project Timeline and Milestones

Provide quantitative monthly or quarterly projections of the accomplishments to be achieved for each function, or activity, in such terms as the number of people to be served and the number of activities accomplished. Data may be organized and presented as project tasks and subtasks with their corresponding timelines during the project period. For example, each project task could be assigned to a row in the first column of a grid. Then, a unit of time could be assigned to each subsequent column, beginning with the first unit (i.e., week, month, quarter) of the project and ending with the last.  Shading, arrows, or other markings could be used across the applicable grid boxes or cells, representing units of time, to indicate the approximate duration and/or frequency of each task and its start and end dates within the project period.

When accomplishments cannot be quantified by activity or function, list them in chronological order to show the schedule of accomplishments and their target dates.

Program Performance Evaluation Plan

Applicants must describe the plan for the program performance evaluation that will contribute to continuous quality improvement. The program performance evaluation should monitor ongoing processes and the progress towards the goals and objectives of the project.  Include descriptions of the inputs (e.g., organizational profile, collaborative partners, key staff, budget, and other resources), key processes, and expected outcomes of the funded activities. The plan must be supported by a logic model and must explain how the inputs, processes and outcomes will be measured, and how the resulting information will be used to inform improvement of funded activities. 

Applicants must describe the systems and processes that will support the organization's performance management requirements through effective tracking of performance outcomes, including a description of how the organization will collect and manage data (e.g. assigned skilled staff, data management software) in a way that allows for accurate and timely reporting of performance outcomes. Applicants must describe any potential obstacles for implementing the program performance evaluation and how those obstacles will be addressed.

NOTE: CB-SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS OF ALL APPLICANTS UNDER THIS FOA

The applicant's evaluation plan must address the following questions, as appropriate:

  1. What are the characteristics of families who abandon substance-exposed and/or HIV/AIDS-affected children who are medically cleared for discharge but remain in a hospital setting or in out-of-home placement?
  2. What service array, in what sequence, is most effective in improving parent substance abuse, parenting capacities, and child social and emotional well-being for children, mothers, fathers, and families of drug exposed infants or children with life-threatening illness or other special medical needs?
  3. What are the contextual factors (e.g., supportive relatives, involvement in after-school activities) and characteristics (e.g., self-esteem, relationship skills) addressed in the provided support and how do these Protective Factors moderate the impacts of past and future negative experiences?
  4. What are the service needs of HIV-positive infants?
  5. What are the barriers to comprehensive case management and to the coordination of service delivery?
  6. What changes have been most helpful in improving the delivery of services?
  7. What changes/improvements have there been in the child's well-being and the child's development?
  8. What changes have there been in parenting capacities, and the family's stability and ability to function?
  9. What are the permanency outcomes for children? 

Applicants must present an evaluation plan and method for collecting data and tracking information related to collaborative efforts and outcomes for clients.

Applicants must propose a rigorous evaluation plan to evaluate their project's effectiveness in addressing substance abuse and /or HIV/AIDS. Experimental designs involving random assignment to treatment and control groups are the preferred method for determining the intervention impacts. An applicant may propose another type of evaluation research design but must include an adequate description and justification that the proposed design is the most rigorous design possible for addressing the questions of interest.  

If it is necessary for their proposed evaluation plans, applicants must have a sound plan for securing informed consent and implementing an IRB review. Applicants should identify the IRB it expects to use and should demonstrate a familiarity with that IRB's procedures and review requirements. If necessary for applicants submitting under this announcement, general information about the HHS Protection of Human Subjects regulations can be obtained at: http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/. Applicants may also contact OHRP by email: ohrp@csophs.dhhs.gov or by phone: 240-453-6900. 

Applicants must propose a plan to collect descriptive data on characteristics of individuals and families served, types and nature of needs identified and met, the services provided, measures of client outcomes, parent substance abuse, child development and well-being, client satisfaction, parenting capacities, parent/child interaction, cost benefit, service utilization, and any other such information as may be required by CB. The proposed evaluation plan must be of sufficient rigor to demonstrate potential linkages between project activities and improved outcomes. Guided by a logic model for the project, this evaluation must include both process and outcome evaluation components. The process evaluation must assess the implementation of the project, as well as the linkages between the collaborative partners that will help ensure that identified needs of children and families are met. The evaluation plan must assess factors and strategies associated with successful partnerships and collaborative efforts, and the potential for sustainability of work undertaken through community-based collaborations and partnerships. Data from this evaluation must inform programmatic improvements or adjustments, as well as expand the knowledge base on what may be potentially effective strategies for maintaining or strengthening family stability among substance-abusing/HIV/AIDS-affected families. 

The applicant's proposed evaluation plan must include an outcome component that uses a sufficiently rigorous approach to examine how the approaches used in this demonstration project affect key outcomes of interest. The applicant must show that evidence from the evaluation will support evidence-based practice and provide examples of strategies that are tied to positive outcomes for children and families. The applicant's evaluation plan must include the analytic method(s) to be used for determining the effectiveness of the strategies and descriptions of data collection tools or assessment instruments. Both qualitative and quantitative methods must be used. Evaluation results must report relevant outputs and outcomes that appropriately reflect the consequences of the project activities. 

Applicants must include a logic model. For the purposes of this funding opportunity, an applicant must include a logic model that clearly states what outcomes are to be achieved, what program strategies will be utilized to specifically impact those outcomes, and what data and instrumentation will be used to measure those outcomes. Information on the development of logic models is available on the Internet at: http://www.childwelfare.gov/management/effectiveness/logic_model.cfm.

Funded Activities Evaluation Plan

Applicants must describe the plan for rigorous evaluation of funded activities. The evaluation must be supported by a logic model.  The evaluation must assess processes and progress towards the goals and objectives of the project, and whether the project is having the expected effects and impacts. The evaluation plan must specify expected outcomes and any research questions. The plan must discuss how the results of this evaluation will provide greater understanding and improvement of the funded activities. The plan must include a valid and reliable measurement plan and sound methodological design. Details regarding the proposed data collection activities, the participants, and data management, and analyses plans must be described. Applicants must describe any potential obstacles foreseen in implementation of the planned evaluation and how those obstacles will be addressed. 

Geographic Location

Describe the precise location of the project and boundaries of the area to be served by the proposed project.

Legal Status of Applicant Entity
Non-profit organizations applying for funding are required to submit proof of their non-profit status. Proof of non-profit status is any one of the following:
  • A reference to the applicant organization's listing in the IRS's most recent list of tax-exempt organizations described in the IRS Code.
  • A copy of a currently valid IRS tax-exemption certificate.
  • A statement from a state taxing body, state attorney general, or other appropriate state official certifying that the applicant organization has non-profit status and that none of the net earnings accrue to any private shareholders or individuals.
  • A certified copy of the organization's certificate of incorporation or similar document that clearly establishes non-profit status.
  • Any of the items in the subparagraphs immediately above for a state or national parent organization and a statement signed by the parent organization that the applicant organization is a local non-profit affiliate.

When applying electronically, it is strongly suggested that the applicant attach proof of non-profit status with the electronic application.

Logic Model

Applicants must submit a logic model for designing and managing their project. A logic model is a tool that presents the conceptual framework for a proposed project and explains the linkages among program elements. While there are many versions of the logic model, they generally summarize the logical connections among the needs that are the focus of the project, project goals and objectives, the target population, project inputs (resources), the proposed activities/processes/outputs directed toward the target population, the expected short- and long-term outcomes the initiative is designed to achieve, and the evaluation plan for measuring the extent to which proposed processes and outcomes actually occur.
Project Sustainability Plan

Applicants must propose a plan for project sustainability after the period of federal funding ends. Grantees are expected to sustain key elements of their grant projects, e.g., strategies or services and interventions, which have been effective in improving practices and those that have led to improved outcomes for children and families.

Describe the approach to project sustainment that will be most effective and feasible. Describe the key individuals and/or organizations whose support will be required in order to sustain program activities. Describe the types of alternative support that will be required to sustain the planned program. If the proposed project involves key project partners, describe how their cooperation and/or collaboration will be maintained after the end of federal funding.

Organizational Capacity

Provide the following information on the applicant organization and, if applicable, on any cooperating partners:

  • Resumes (no more than two single-spaced pages in length);
  • Copy or description of the applicant organizationís fiscal control and accountability procedures;
  • Evidence that the applicant organization, and any partnering organizations, have relevant experience and expertise with administration, development, implementation, management, and evaluation of programs similar to that offered under this announcement;
  • Evidence that each participating organization, including partners and/or subcontractors, possess the organizational capability to fulfill their role(s) and function(s) effectively;
  • Job descriptions for each vacant key position.
Protection of Sensitive and/or Confidential Information

If any confidential or sensitive information will be collected during the course of the project, whether from staff (e.g., background investigations) or project participants and/or project beneficiaries, provide a description of the methods that will be used to ensure that confidential and/or sensitive information is properly handled and safeguarded. Also provide a plan for the disposition of such information at the end of the project period.

Dissemination Plan

Applicants must propose a plan to disseminate reports, products, and/or grant project outputs so that project information is provided to key target audiences. Dissemination plans must include:

  • Dissemination goals and objectives;
  • Strategies to identify and engage with target audiences;
  • Allocation of sufficient staff time and budget for dissemination purposes;
  • A preliminary plan to evaluate the extent to which target audiences have received project information and have used it as intended.
Third-Party Agreements

Third-party agreements include Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) and Letters of Commitment. General letters of support are not considered to be third-party agreements. Third-party agreements must clearly describe the project activities and support to which the third party is committing.  Third-party agreements must be signed by the person in the third-party organization with the authority to make such commitments on behalf of their organization.

Provide written and signed agreements between grantees and subgrantees, or subcontractors, or other cooperating entities. These agreements must detail the scope of work to be performed, work schedules, remuneration, and other terms and conditions that structure or define the relationship.
Collaboration/consortia applicants must provide letters of commitment or MOU identifying the primary applicant that is responsible for administering the grant. The primary applicant must provide documentation of the commitments made by partnering organizations and describe in detail their roles and responsibilities as partners in the collaboration/consortia.

The Project Budget and Budget Justification

 

All applicants are required to submit a project budget and budget justification with their application. The project budget is input on the Budget Information Standard Form, either SF-424A or SF-424C, according to the directions provided with the SFs. The budget justification consists of a budget narrative and a line-item budget detail that includes detailed calculations for "object class categories" identified on the Budget Information Standard Form. The line-item budget detail and the budget narrative must be submitted as a single Budget Justification application component.

Project budget calculations must include estimation methods, quantities, unit costs, and other similar quantitative detail sufficient for the calculation to be duplicated. If matching or cost sharing is a requirement, applicants must include a detailed listing of any funding sources identified in Block 18 of the SF-424 (Application for Federal Assistance). See the table in Section IV.2. Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications listing the appropriate budget forms to use in this application.

Special Note: The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012 (Pub.L. 112-74), enacted December 23, 2011, limits the salary amount that may be awarded and charged to ACF grants and cooperative agreements. Award funds issued under this announcement may not be used to pay the salary, or any percentage of salary, to an individual at a rate in excess of Executive Level II. The Executive Level II salary of the Federal Executive Pay scale is $179,700 (http://www.opm.gov/oca/12tables/html/ex.asp). This amount reflects an individual’s base salary exclusive of fringe benefits and any income that an individual may be permitted to earn outside of the duties to the applicant organization.  This salary limitation also applies to subawards/subcontracts under a ACF grant or cooperative agreement.

Provide a budget justification using the 424A and/or 424C, as applicable, for each year of the proposed project. Provide a budget justification, which includes a budget narrative and a line-item detail, for each year of the proposed project. The budget narrative should describe how the categorical costs are derived. Discuss the necessity, reasonableness, and allocation of the proposed costs.

NOTE: CB-SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS OF ALL APPLICANTS UNDER THIS FOA

Applicants must allocate sufficient funds in the budget to:

  1. Provide for the project director, the evaluator and other key partners to attend an early kickoff meeting for grantees funded under this priority area to be held within the first 3 months of the project (first year only) in Washington, D.C.; and
  2. Provide for the project director, the evaluator, and other key partners to attend an annual 3-day grantees' meeting in Washington, D.C.
General

Use the following guidelines for preparing the budget and budget justification.  When a match or cost share is required, both federal and non-federal resources must be detailed and justified in the budget and budget narrative justification. "Federal resources" refers only to the ACF grant funds for which the applicant is applying. “Non-federal resources” are all other non-ACF federal and non-federal resources. It is suggested that budget amounts and computations be presented in a columnar format:  first column, object class categories; second column, federal budget; next column(s), non-federal budget(s); and last column, total budget. The budget justification should be in a narrative form.

Personnel

Description:  Costs of employee salaries and wages.

Justification: Identify the project director or principal investigator, if known at the time of application.  For each staff person provide:  the title; time commitment to the project in months; time commitment to the project as a percentage or full-time equivalent: annual salary; grant salary; wage rates; etc.  Do not include the costs of consultants, personnel costs of delegate agencies, or of specific project(s) and/or businesses to be financed by the applicant. Contractors and consultants should not be placed under this category.

Fringe Benefits

Description:  Costs of employee fringe benefits unless treated as part of an approved indirect cost rate.   

Justification:  Provide a breakdown of the amounts and percentages that comprise fringe benefit costs such as health insurance, Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) taxes, retirement insurance, and taxes.


Travel

Description:  Costs of out-of-state or overnight project-related travel by employees of the applicant organization. Do not include in-state travel or consultant travel.

Justification:  For each trip show the total number of traveler(s); travel destination; duration of trip; per diem; mileage allowances, if privately owned vehicles will be used to travel out of town; and other transportation costs and subsistence allowances.  If appropriate for this project, travel costs for key project staff to attend ACF-sponsored workshops/conferences/grantee orientations should be detailed in the budget.

Equipment

Description:  "Equipment" means an article of nonexpendable, tangible personal property having a useful life of more than one year per unit and an acquisition cost that equals or exceeds the lesser of:  (a) the capitalization level established by the organization for the financial statement purposes, or (b) $5,000.  (Note:  Acquisition cost means the net invoice unit price of an item of equipment, including the cost of any modifications, attachments, accessories, or auxiliary apparatus necessary to make it usable for the purpose for which it is acquired.  Ancillary charges, such as taxes, duty, protective in-transit insurance, freight, and installation, shall be included in or excluded from acquisition cost in accordance with the applicant organization's regular written accounting practices.) 

Justification:  For each type of equipment requested applicants must provide a description of the equipment; the cost per unit; the number of units; the total cost; and a plan for use of the equipment in the project; as well as a plan for the use, and/or disposal of, the equipment after the project ends.  An applicant organization that uses its own definition for equipment should provide a copy of its policy, or section of its policy, that includes the equipment definition.

Supplies

Description:  Costs of all tangible personal property other than that included under the Equipment category.  This includes office and other consumable supplies with a per-unit cost of less than $5,000.

Justification:  Specify general categories of supplies and their costs.  Show computations and provide other information that supports the amount requested.

Contractual

Description:  Costs of all contracts for services and goods except for those that belong under other categories such as equipment, supplies, construction, etc.  Include third-party evaluation contracts, if applicable, and contracts with secondary recipient organizations (with budget detail), including delegate agencies and specific project(s) and/or businesses to be financed by the applicant.  This area is not for individual consultants.

Justification:  Demonstrate that all procurement transactions will be conducted in a manner to provide, to the maximum extent practical, open, and free competition. Recipients and subrecipients, other than states that are required to use 45 CFR Part 92 procedures, must justify any anticipated procurement action that is expected to be awarded without competition and exceeds the simplified acquisition threshold fixed by 41 U.S.C. § 134 and currently set at $100,000.  Recipients may be required to make pre-award review and procurement documents, such as requests for proposals or invitations for bids, independent cost estimates, etc., available to ACF.

Note: Whenever the applicant intends to delegate part of the project to another agency, the applicant must provide a detailed budget and budget narrative for each contractor/sub-contractor, by agency title, along with the same supporting information referred to in these instructions.  If the applicant plans to select the contractors/sub-contractors post-award and a detailed budget is not available at the time of application, the applicant must provide information on the nature of the work to be delegated, the estimated costs, and the process for selecting the delegate agency.

Other

Enter the total of all other costs.  Such costs, where applicable and appropriate, may include but are not limited to:  consultant costs, local travel; insurance; food (when allowable); medical and dental costs (noncontractual); professional services costs (including audit charges); space and equipment rentals; printing and publication; computer use; training costs, such as tuition and stipends; staff development costs; and administrative costs.

Justification:  Provide computations, a narrative description, and a justification for each cost under this category.

Indirect Charges

Description:  Total amount of indirect costs.  This category should be used only when the applicant currently has an indirect cost rate approved by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) or another cognizant federal agency. 

Justification:  An applicant that will charge indirect costs to the grant must enclose a copy of the current rate agreement.  If the applicant organization is in the process of initially developing or renegotiating a rate, upon notification that an award will be made, it should immediately develop a tentative indirect cost rate proposal based on its most recently completed fiscal year, in accordance with the cognizant agency's guidelines for establishing indirect cost rates, and submit it to the cognizant agency. Applicants awaiting approval of their indirect cost proposals may also request indirect costs. When an indirect cost rate is requested, those costs included in the indirect cost pool should not be charged as direct costs to the grant.  Also, if the applicant is requesting a rate that is less than what is allowed under the program, the authorized representative of the applicant organization must submit a signed acknowledgement that the applicant is accepting a lower rate than allowed.

Program Income

Description:  The estimated amount of income, if any, expected to be generated from this project. Program income includes, but is not limited to, income from fees for services performed, the use or rental of real or personal property acquired under federally-funded projects, the sale of commodities or items fabricated under an award, license fees and royalties on patents and copyrights, and interest on loans made with award funds. 

Justification:  Describe the nature, source, and anticipated use of program income in the budget or refer to the pages in the application that contain this information.

Paperwork Reduction Disclaimer

As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, 44 U.S.C. §§ 3501-3521, the public reporting burden for the Project Description is estimated to average 60 hours per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and reviewing the collection information. The Project Description information collection is approved under OMB control number 0970-0139, which expires 10/31/2015. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number.

IV.2. Content and Form of Application Submission

Application Submission Options

Electronic Submission via www.Grants.gov

  • Additional guidance on the submission of electronic applications can be found at http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp.
  • If applicants encounter any technical difficulties in using www.Grants.gov, contact the Grants.gov Contact Center at: 1-800-518-4726, or by email at support@grants.gov, to report the problem and obtain assistance. Hours of Operation: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The Grants.gov Contact Center is closed on federal holidays.
  • Applicants should always retain Grants.gov Contact Center service ticket number(s) as they may be needed for future reference.
  • Contact with the Grants.gov Contact Center prior to the listed application due date and time does not ensure acceptance of an application. If difficulties are encountered, the Grants Management Officer listed in Section VII. Agency Contacts will determine whether the submission issues are due to Grants.gov system errors or user error.

Application Validation at www.Grants.gov

After an application has been successfully submitted to www.Grants.gov, it still must pass a series of validation checks.  After an application is submitted, Grants.gov generates a submission receipt via email and also sets the application status to "Received." This receipt verifies that the application has been successfully delivered to the Grants.gov system.

Next, Grants.gov verifies the submission is valid by ensuring it does not contain viruses, the opportunity is still open, and the applicant login and applicant DUNS number match. If the submission is valid, Grants.gov generates a submission validation receipt via email and sets the application status to "Validated."

If the application is not validated, the application status is set to "Rejected." The system sends a rejection email notification to the applicant and the applicant must re-submit the application package. See "What to Expect After Submitting" at www.Grants.gov for more information.

Each time an application is submitted, or resubmitted, via www.Grants.gov, the application will receive a new date and time stamp. Only those applications with on-time date and time stamps that result in a validated application, which are transmitted to ACF, will be acknowledged.

Applicants will be provided with an acknowledgement from Grants.gov that the submitted application package has passed, or failed, a series of checks and validations. Applications that are submitted on time that fail the validation check will not be transmitted to ACF and will not be acknowledged.

Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission

ACF recognizes that some applicants may have limited or no Internet access, and/or limited computer capacity, which may prohibit them from uploading large files at www.Grants.gov. To accommodate such applicants, ACF offers an exemption from required electronic submission. The exemption will allow applicants to submit hard copy, paper applications by hand-delivery, applicant courier, overnight/express mail couriers, or by other representatives of the applicant.

To receive an exemption from required electronic application submission, applicants must submit a written request to ACF that must state that the applicant qualifies for the exemption for one of the two following reasons:

  • Lack of Internet access or Internet connection, or
  • Limited computer capacity that prevents the uploading of large documents (files) at www.Grants.gov.

Applicants may request and receive the exemption from required electronic application submission by either:

  • Submitting an email request to electronicappexemption@acf.hhs.gov, or
  • Sending a written request to the Office of Grants Management Contact listed in Section VII. Agency Contacts in this announcement.

Requests for exemption from required electronic application submission will be acknowledged with an approval or disapproval.

Requests that do not state one of the two listed reasons will not be approved.

An exemption is applicable to all applications submitted by the applicant organization during the Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) in which it is received. Applicants need only request an exemption once in a FFY.  Applicants must request a new exemption from required electronic submission for any succeeding FFY.

Please Note: electronicappexemption@acf.hhs.gov may only be used to request an exemption from required electronic submission. All other inquiries must be directed to the appropriate Agency Contact listed in Section VII. of this announcement. Queries or requests submitted to this email address for any reason other than a request for an exemption from electronic application submission will not be acknowledged or answered.

All exemption requests must include the following information:

  • Funding Opportunity Announcement Title,
  • Funding Opportunity Number (FON),
  • The listed Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number,
  • Name of Applicant Organization and DUNS Number,
  • AOR name and contact information,
  • Name and contact information of person to be contacted on matters involving the application (i.e., the Point of Contact), and
  • The reason for which the applicant is requesting an exemption from electronic application submission. The request for exemption must state one of the following two reasons: 1) lack of Internet access or Internet connection; or 2) lack of computer capacity that prevents uploading large documents (files) to the Internet.

Exemption requests must be received by ACF no later than two weeks before the application due date, that is, 14 calendar days prior to the application due date listed in the Overview and in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times. If the fourteenth calendar day falls on a weekend or federal holiday, the due date for receipt of an exemption request will move to the next federal business day that follows the weekend or federal holiday.

Applicants may refer to Section VIII. Other Information for a checklist of application requirements that may be used in developing and organizing application materials. Details concerning acknowledgment of received applications are available in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times of this announcement.

Paper Format Application Submission

An exemption is now required for the submission of paper applications. See the preceding section on "Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission."

Applicants with exemptions that submit their applications in paper format, by mail or delivery, must submit one original and two copies of the complete application with all attachments. The original and each of the two copies must include all required forms, certifications, assurances, and appendices, be signed by the AOR, and be unbound.  The original copy of the application must have original signature(s). See Section IV.6. of this announcement for address information for paper format application submissions.


Applicants may refer to Section VIII. Other Information for a checklist of application requirements that may be used in developing and organizing application materials.  Details concerning acknowledgment of received applications are available in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times in this announcement.

IV.3. Submission Dates and Times

IV.3. Submission Dates and Times

Due Date for Applications: 05/13/2013

Explanation of Due Dates

The due date for receipt of applications is listed in the Overview section and in this section. See Section III.3. Application Disqualification Factors.

Electronic Applications

The deadline for submission of electronic applications via www.Grants.gov is 11:59 p.m., ET, on the due date. Electronic applications submitted at 12:00 a.m., ET, on the day after the due date will be considered late and will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

Applicants are required to submit their applications electronically via www.Grants.gov unless they received an exemption through the process described in Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission.

ACF does not accommodate transmission of applications by email or facsimile.

Instructions for electronic submission via www.Grants.gov are available at: http://www.grants.gov/applicants/apply_for_grants.jsp.

Applications submitted to www.Grants.gov at any time during the open application period prior to the due date and time that fail the Grants.gov validation check will not be received at ACF. These applications will not be acknowledged.

Mailed Paper Format Applications

The deadline for mailed paper applications is 4:30 p.m., ET, on the due date. Mailed paper applications received after the due date and deadline time will be considered late and will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

Paper format application submissions will be disqualified if the applicant organization has not received an exemption through the process described in Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission.

Hand-Delivered Paper Format Applications

Applications that are hand-delivered by applicants, applicant couriers, by overnight/express mail couriers, or other representatives of the applicant must be received on, or before, the due date listed in the Overview and in this section. These applications must be delivered between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., ET,Monday through Friday (excluding federal holidays). Applications should be delivered to the address provided in Section IV.6.Other Submission Requirements.

Hand-delivered paper applications received after the due date and deadline time will be considered late and will be disqualified from competitive review and from funding under this announcement.

Hand-delivered paper format application submissions will be disqualified if the applicant organization has not received an exemption through the process described in Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission.

No appeals will be considered for applications classified as late under the following circumstances:

  • Applications submitted electronically via www.Grants.gov are considered late when they are dated and time-stamped after the deadline of 11:59 p.m., ET, on the due date.
  • Paper format applications received by mail or hand-delivery after 4:30 p.m., ET, on the due date will be classified as late and will be disqualified.
  • Paper format applications received from applicant organizations that were not approved for an exemption from required electronic application submission under the process described in Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Submission will be disqualified.

Extensions and/or Waiving Due Date and Receipt Time Requirements

ACF may extend an application due date and receipt time when circumstances make it impossible for applicants to submit their applications on time. These events include natural disasters (floods, hurricanes, tornados, etc.), or when there are widespread disruptions of electrical service, or mail service, or in other rare cases. The determination to extend or waive due date and/or receipt time requirements rests with the Grants Management Officer listed as the Office of Grants Management Contact in Section VII. Agency Contacts.

Acknowledgement from www.Grants.gov

Applicants will receive an initial email upon submission of their application to www.Grants.gov. This email will provide a Grants.gov Tracking Number. Applicants should refer to this tracking number in all communication with Grants.gov. The email will also provide a date and time stamp, which serves as the official record of application's submission. Receipt of this email does not indicate that the application is accepted or that is has passed the validation check.

Applicants will be provided with an acknowledgement from www.Grants.gov that the submitted application package has passed, or failed, a series of checks and validations. Applications that are submitted on time that fail the validation check will not be transmitted to ACF and will not be acknowledged.

See "What to Expect After Submitting" at www.Grants.gov for more information.

Acknowledgement from ACF of an electronic application's submission:

Applicants will be sent additional email(s) from ACF acknowledging that the application has been retrieved from www.Grants.gov by ACF. Receipt of these emails is not an indication that the application is accepted for competition.

Acknowledgement from ACF of receipt of a paper format application

ACF will not provide acknowledgement of receipt of hard copy application packages submitted via mail or courier services.

IV.4. Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs (SPOC)

IV.4. Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs

This program is covered under Executive Order (E.O.) 12372, "Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs," and 45 CFR Part 100, "Intergovernmental Review of Department of Health and Human Services Programs and Activities." Under the Executive Order, States may design their own processes for reviewing and commenting on proposed Federal assistance under covered programs.

Applicants should go to the following URL for the official list of the jurisdictions that have elected to participate in E.O. 12372 http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants_spoc/.
Applicants from participating jurisdictions should contact their SPOC, as soon as possible, to alert them of their prospective applications and to receive instructions on their jurisdiction's procedures. Applicants must submit all required application materials to the SPOC and indicate the date of submission on the Standard Form (SF) 424 at item 19.

Under 45 CFR 100.8(a)(2), a SPOC has 60 days from the application due date to comment on proposed new awards.

SPOC comments may be submitted directly to ACF to: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Grants Management, Division of Discretionary Grants, 370 L''Enfant Promenade SW., 6th Floor East, Washington, DC 20447.

Entities that meet the eligibility requirements of this announcement are still eligible to apply for a grant even if a State, Territory or Commonwealth, etc., does not have a SPOC or has chosen not to participate in the process. Applicants from non-participating jurisdictions need take no action with regard to E.O. 12372. Applications from Federally-recognized Indian Tribal governments are not subject to E.O. 12372.
IV.5. Funding Restrictions

IV.5. Funding Restrictions

Costs of organized fund raising, including financial campaigns, endowment drives, solicitation of gifts and bequests, and similar expenses incurred solely to raise capital or obtain contributions, are considered unallowable costs under grants or cooperative agreements awarded under this funding opportunity announcement.

Note: Costs incurred for grant application preparation are not considered allowable costs under an award and may not be included in the project budget or budget justification.

Grant awards will not allow reimbursement of pre-award costs.
Construction is not an allowable activity or expenditure under this grant award.
Purchase of real property is not an allowable activity or expenditure under this grant award.
IV.6. Other Submission Requirements

IV.6. Other Submission Requirements

Submit paper applications to one of the following addresses. See Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission.

Submission By Mail

CB Operations Center
c/o Lux Consulting Group
8405 Colesville Road, Suite 600
Silver Spring, MD 20910

Hand Delivery

CB Operations Center
c/o Lux Consulting Group
8405 Colesville Road, Suite 600
Silver Spring, MD 20910

Electronic Submission

See Section IV.2 for application requirements and for guidance when submitting applications electronically via http://www.Grants.gov.

For all submissions, see Section IV.3 for information on due dates and times.

V. Application Review Information

V.1. Criteria

Please note: Reviewers will not access, or review, any materials that are not part of the application documents.  This includes information accessible on websites via hyperlinks that are referenced, or embedded, in the application.  Though an application may include web links, or embedded hyperlinks, reviewers will not review this information as it is not considered to be part of the application documents.  Nor will the information on websites be taken into consideration in scoring of evaluation criteria presented in this section. Reviewers will evaluate and score an application based on the documents that are presented in the application and will not refer to, or access, external links during the objective review.

Applications competing for financial assistance will be reviewed and evaluated using the criteria described in this section. The corresponding point values indicate the relative importance placed on each review criterion. Points will be allocated based on the extent to which the application proposal addresses each of the criteria listed. Applicants should address these criteria in their application materials, particularly in the project description and budget justification, as they are the basis upon which competing applications will be judged during the objective review. The required elements of the project description and budget justification may be found in Section IV.2 of this announcement.
 
OBJECTIVES AND NEED FOR ASSISTANCE Maximum Points: 20

In reviewing the objectives and need for assistance, reviewers will consider the extent to which: 

  1. The application clearly demonstrates an understanding of the provisions of the Abandoned Infants Assistance Act, as amended, and the proposed project will contribute to achieving those legislative goals and objectives, and the goals of this FOA.
  2. The applicant demonstrates a clear understanding of the issues that have an impact on substance abusing and/or HIV/AIDS-affected women and their children.
  3. The application presents a thorough review of the relevant literature that reflects a clear understanding of the research on best practices and promising approaches as it relates to the proposed project, and sets a sound context and rationale for the project.
APPROACH Maximum Points: 35

In reviewing the approach, reviewers will consider the extent to which: 

1. The applicant proposes a sound technical approach (0-10 points):

  • The applicant presents a clear vision of the proposed comprehensive services project to be developed and implemented. The applicant makes a clear statement of the goals (end results of an effective project) and objectives (measurable steps for reaching these goals) for the proposed comprehensive services project.
  • The proposal demonstrates how these goals and objectives will effectively address a community's need to provide comprehensive support services to the target population by using a collaborative, integrated system of community-based, coordinated support services.
  • The applicant provides a clear and reasonable timeline (including a timeline chart) and narrative for implementing the proposed project, including major milestones and target dates.
  • The applicant describes how they will address contextual factors (e.g., supportive relatives; participating in family celebrations; access to essential services, such as, health care and child care; housing; parental peer-to-peer support; parental involvement in school activities; positive parental social connections) and characteristics (e.g., improving self-esteem; a loving, caring relationship with an adult; skills to cope with stress; positive peer interactions; positive adult guidance; trust in the parent; developing relationship skills) in the provided support and how these Protective Factors can be expected to moderate the impacts of past and future negative experiences.
  • The applicant clearly describes and details the level of commitment and the roles and responsibilities of the collaborating agencies participating in the proposed effort and how case planning and management will be shared. The applicant documents experience in coordinating services with community-based agencies in service provision; developing cross training and staff development among agencies; developing processes for communication and information-sharing across agencies; and developing, sharing and meeting program outcomes among agencies.
  • The applicant presents a current or previous coordination activity that describes the coordinated effort and agreed upon outcomes.
  • The applicant provides a well-defined logic model that guides the proposed project and presents a plausible theory of change. The logic model demonstrates strong links between proposed inputs and activities and intended short- and long-term outcomes.
  • The applicant presents a strong rationale and sound justification for the proposed service structure and consortium of community-based service providers with convincing linkages between the proposed work and the needs of the target population.
  • The applicant demonstrates a thorough understanding of the challenges in providing community-based, collaborative, comprehensive services to this target population with such complex needs and provides a sound plan for overcoming those challenges.
  • The applicant presents a comprehensive and reasonable description of factors that could speed or hinder the implementation of the project and a sound plan to manage these factors.
  • There is a sound plan for continuing this project beyond the period of Federal funding.
  • The schedule for implementing the project is appropriate in scope and budget.

2. The applicant's proposal is responsive to the purposes and requirements of this FOA (0-10 points):

  • The applicant clearly identifies the population to be served by the project and thoroughly describes the needs of the proposed target population as they relate to this project, by presenting an analysis of local data. The number of infants, children, and families to be served by the project is reasonable and appropriate.
  • The geographic location to be served by the project is clearly defined and justified based on factors such as the key socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of the target population in the targeted community, and the current availability of and gaps in services for these families in this community.
  • The applicant describes a comprehensive, collaborative approach that establishes an infrastructure of community-based service providers (or engages an existing consortium) and promotes a lasting change in the delivery of community-based services to this client population.
  • The applicant presents a detailed and reasonable plan to work effectively with terminally ill parent(s), if present in the program, to make permanency planning arrangements.
  • The proposed project is culturally responsive to the target population.
  • The applicant describes how priority would be given to abandoned infants and young children who are infected with, or have been perinatally exposed to HIV, or have been perinatally exposed to a dangerous drug, and will allow flexibility to meet the needs of their medically fragile children who are abandoned or at risk of abandonment.

3. The applicant selects appropriate screening, assessment, and service array, and ties to outcomes to be achieved in order to achieve a comprehensive support approach (0-10 points).

  • The design of the proposed project reflects current knowledge from research and literature related to substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, parenting capacities trauma, and child well-being. The applicant uses this knowledge to describe the specific service array to be implemented and the sequence and dosage of the interventions chosen. If the applicant is proposing a practice other than an evidence-based intervention, the proposal provides justification and addresses the criteria identified throughout this FOA.
  • The applicant chooses interventions with the highest level of evidence practicable to address the needs identified with a specific emphasis on interventions that 1) decrease parent substance abuse; 2) increase parenting capacities; and 3) improve child social and emotional well-being and help get children back on target developmentally.
  • The applicant describes the valid and reliable screening and assessment instruments to be used to determine exposure to trauma and parent and child functioning, and how these align with the EBPs and/or service array chosen. The applicant describes how these instruments will be used over time for on-going progress monitoring.
  • The applicant describes the significant results or benefits that can be expected for the target population and how these align with the EBPs and/or service array chosen.
  • The applicant provides evidence that the proposed project will, among other outcomes, 1) decrease parental substance abuse; 2) increase parenting capacities; and 3) improve child social and emotional well-being and help get children back on target developmentally.
  • The applicant provides evidence of how safety and permanency outcomes, to include preventing the abandonment of infants and young children, will improve as a result of the proposed approach.

4. The applicant proposes a project that would inform the field (0-5 points):

  • The design of the project is innovative and would contribute to increased knowledge or understanding of the problems and issues addressed by this FOA. The project is likely to yield findings about effective strategies that contribute to evidence-based practices and may be used to guide replications or testing in other settings.
  • There is a sound dissemination plan with clear goals, a description of target audiences, and a reasonable schedule for development of products resulting from the proposed project. The dissemination plan includes appropriate mechanisms and forums that would effectively convey the information and support successful replication by other interested agencies.
EVALUATION Maximum Points: 20

In reviewing the evaluation plan, reviewers will consider the extent to which:  

  1. The applicant proposes a clear and convincing plan for evaluating the project and satisfies the requirements for the evaluation published in this FOA. The methods of evaluation are feasible, comprehensive, and appropriate to the goals, objectives, and context of the project. The evaluation plan is strongly guided by the project's logic model. The project's evaluation plan would rigorously measure achievement of project objectives and answer the questions described in this FOA. The proposed evaluation plan includes both qualitative and quantitative methods.
  2. The evaluation plan will assess how the provision of services support the targeted families and improve specific measurable outcomes.
  3. The evaluation plan will assess how protective factors moderate the impacts of past and future negative experiences, and how building protective factors prepares the children and families for positive outcomes.
  4. The evaluation plan outlines an appropriate sampling plan that ensures sample sizes sufficient to detect significant effects. The target sample represents the intended recipients of the services to the greatest extent possible given the project's structure and resources.
  5. The evaluation plan includes an appropriate control or comparison group for determining the influence of the project activities on outcomes. If a comparison group is not proposed, the applicant provides a reasonable explanation for not using a comparison group and offers another, equally rigorous approach to evaluating the influence of the program on outcomes. This comparison group and the program/treatment group are assigned at random or matched on key characteristics. If not assigned at random or matched on key characteristics, the applicant provides a reasonable explanation of how it will identify and address any pre-existing differences between the comparison group and the program/treatment group.
  6. The applicant proposes a sound plan for collecting high-quality data on the services provided, the costs of these services, the outcomes of these services, and their cost effectiveness. The methods of evaluation include the use of strong measures that are clearly related to the intended outcomes of the program as identified in the project logic model. The evaluation includes measures of outcomes, in addition to measures of inputs and outputs. The measures are objective and have strong reliability, validity, and internal consistency. There is a sound plan for securing informed consent and implementing an IRB review, if applicable.
  7. The applicant either demonstrates that they have the in-house capacity to conduct an objective and rigorous evaluation of the project or presents a sound plan for contracting with a third-party evaluator. The proposed evaluator has sufficient experience with research and/or evaluation, understands the population of interest, and demonstrates the necessary independence from the project to assure objectivity.
  8. The application provides an appropriate, feasible, and realistic plan for using evaluation findings to produce ongoing documentation of project activities and results. The evaluation plan includes performance feedback and periodic assessment of program progress that can be used to modify the program, as necessary, and serve as a basis for program adjustments.
  9. The applicant describes the methods to be used to determine the extent to which the project has achieved its stated objectives and the extent to which the accomplishment of objectives can be attributed to the project, and defines the monitoring procedures used to determine whether the project is being carried out in a manner consistent with the work plan presented.
  10. In addressing the impact of the project’s activities and effectiveness, and the collection of descriptive data, the applicant addresses the relevant criteria in the project description of this FOA.

ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILES Maximum Points: 20

In reviewing the organizational profiles, reviewers will consider the extent to which: 

  1. The applicant and collaborating organizations collectively have relevant experience and expertise with administration, development, implementation, management, and evaluation of similar projects, e.g., providing comprehensive social services at the community level. Each participating organization possesses the organizational capability to fulfill its assigned roles and functions effectively.
  2. The applicant documents that the project director and key project staff demonstrate sufficient relevant knowledge, experience, and capabilities (e.g., resume) to effectively institute and manage a project of this size, scope, and complexity. The role, responsibilities, and time commitments of each proposed project staff position, including consultants, subcontractors, and/or collaborators, is clearly defined (e.g., job description) and appropriate to the successful implementation of the proposed project.
  3. There is a sound management plan for achieving the objectives of the proposed project on time and within budget, including clearly defined responsibilities, timelines, and milestones for accomplishing project tasks and ensuring quality. The plan clearly defines the role and responsibilities of the lead agency. The plan clearly describes the effective management and coordination of activities carried out by any collaborators, subcontractors, and consultants (if applicable).
  4. There would be a mutually beneficial relationship between the proposed project and other work planned, anticipated, or underway with Federal assistance by the applicant.
  5. The applicant organization and its staff have sufficient experience in successfully providing comprehensive services to the target population.
  6. The applicant proposes a consortium of collaborating agencies whose background and experience with the target population would support the planning and implementation of the proposed project.
  7. There are third-party agreements with each collaborator agreeing to participate if the proposal is funded. These agreements describe the roles and provide evidence of commitment from partner agencies and organizations participating in this effort.
BUDGET AND BUDGET JUSTIFICATION Maximum Points: 5

In reviewing the budget and budget justification, reviewers will consider the extent to which: 

  1. The applicant includes a detailed narrative budget.
  2. The costs of the proposed project are reasonable and programmatically justified, in view of the targeted population and community, the activities to be conducted, and the expected results and benefits.
  3. The applicant's fiscal controls and accounting procedures would ensure prudent use, proper and timely disbursement, and accurate accounting of funds received under this FOA.
  4. The budget provides for the project director, evaluator, and other key collaborators to attend an early kickoff meeting for grantees funded under this FOA to be held within the first 3 months of the projects (first year only) in Washington, D.C.; and costs for the project director, the evaluator, and other key collaborators to attend an annual 3-day grantee's meeting for each year of the 3-year grant.
  5. The applicant has allocated an adequate portion of the budget to satisfactorily collect and evaluate the data necessary to measure the accomplishments of the project.
V.2. & V.3. Review and Selection Process
V.2. Review and Selection Process

No grant award will be made under this announcement on the basis of an incomplete application.  No grant award will be made to an applicant or sub-recipient that does not have a DUNS number (www.dbn.com) and an active registration at SAM (www.sam.gov). See Section III.3. Other.
 
Initial ACF Screening

Each application will be screened to determine whether it meets one of the following disqualification criteria as described in Section III.3. Application Disqualification Factors

  • Applications that are designated as late according to Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times,
  • Applications that are submitted in paper format without prior approval of an exemption from required electronic submission (Section IV.2. Request an Exemption from Required Electronic Application Submission), or
  • Applications with requests that exceed the award ceiling stated in Section II. Award Information

For those applications that have been disqualified under the initial ACF screening, notice will be provided by postal mail or by email. See Section IV.3. Explanation of Due Dates for information on Grants.gov's and ACF's acknowledgment of received applications.

Objective Review and Results

Applications competing for financial assistance will be reviewed and evaluated by objective review panels using the criteria described in Section V.1. Criteria of this announcement. Each panel is composed of experts with knowledge and experience in the area under review. Generally, review panels include three reviewers and one chairperson.

Results of the competitive objective review are taken into consideration by ACF in the selection of projects for funding; however, objective review scores and rankings are not binding. They are one element in the decision-making process.

ACF may elect not to fund applicants with management or financial problems that would indicate an inability to successfully complete the proposed project. Applications may be funded in whole or in part. Successful applicants may be funded at an amount lower than that requested.  ACF reserves the right to consider preferences to fund organizations serving emerging, unserved, or under-served populations, including those populations located in pockets of poverty. ACF will also consider the geographic distribution of federal funds in its award decisions.

The reauthorized legislation requires the Secretary to give priority to applicants located in States that have developed and implemented procedures for expedited termination of parental rights and placement for adoption of infants determined to be abandoned under State law.

Please refer to Section IV.2. of this announcement for information on non-federal reviewers in the review process.

Approved but Unfunded Applications

Applications recommended for approval that were not funded under the competition because of the lack of available funds may be held over by ACF and reconsidered in a subsequent review cycle if a future competition under the program area is planned.  These applications will be held over for a period of up to one year and will be re-competed for funding with all other competing applications in the next available review cycle.  For those applications that have been deemed as approved but unfunded, notice will be given of such determination by postal mail.

 
V.3. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates

Applications will be reviewed during the summer 2013. Funded projects will have a start date no later than September 30, 2013.

VI. Award Administration Information
VI.1. Award Notices

Successful applicants will be notified through the issuance of a Notice of Award (NOA) that sets forth the amount of funds granted, the terms and conditions of the grant, the effective date of the grant, the budget period for which initial support will be given, the non-federal share to be provided (if applicable), and the total project period for which support is contemplated. The NOA will be signed by the Grants Officer and transmitted via postal mail or email. Following the finalization of funding decisions, organizations whose applications will not be funded will be notified by letter signed by the cognizant Program Office head. Any other correspondence that announces to a Principal Investigator, or a Project Director, that an application was selected is not an authorization to begin performance. 

Project costs that are incurred prior to the receipt of the NoA are at the recipient's risk and may be reimbursed only to the extent that they are considered allowable as approved pre-award costs. Information on allowable pre-award costs and the time period under which they may be incurred is available in Section IV.5. Funding Restrictions.

 
VI.2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

Awards issued under this announcement are subject to the uniform administrative requirements and cost principles of 45 CFR Part 74 (Awards And Subawards To Institutions Of Higher Education, Hospitals, Other Nonprofit Organizations, And Commercial Organizations) or 45 CFR Part 92 (Grants And Cooperative Agreements To State, Local, And Tribal Governments).  The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) is available at http://www.gpo.gov.

An application funded with the release of federal funds through a grant award does not constitute, or imply, compliance with federal regulations.  Funded organizations are responsible for ensuring that their activities comply with all applicable federal regulations.

Prohibition Against Profit

Grantees are subject to the limitations set forth in 45 CFR Part 74, Subpart E-Special Provisions for Awards to Commercial Organizations (45 CFR § 74.81_Prohibition against profit), which states that, "... no HHS funds may be paid as profit to any recipient even if the recipient is a commercial organization.  Profit is any amount in excess of allowable direct and indirect costs." 

Equal Treatment for Faith-Based Organizations

Grantees are also subject to the requirements of 45 CFR § 87.1(c), Equal Treatment for Faith-Based Organizations, which says, "Organizations that receive direct financial assistance from the [Health and Human Services] Department under any Department program may not engage in inherently religious activities such as worship, religious instruction, or proselytization, as part of the programs or services funded with direct financial assistance from the Department."  Therefore, organizations must take steps to completely separate the presentation of any program with religious content from the presentation of the Federally funded program by time or location in such a way that it is clear that the two programs are separate and distinct. If separating the two programs by time but presenting them in the same location, one program must completely end before the other program begins.

A faith-based organization receiving HHS funds retains its independence from federal, state, and local governments, and may continue to carry out its mission, including the definition, practice, and expression of its religious beliefs. For example, a faith-based organization may use space in its facilities to provide secular programs or services funded with federal funds without removing religious art, icons, scriptures, or other religious symbols. In addition, a faith-based organization that receives federal funds retains its authority over its internal governance, and it may retain religious terms in its organization's name, select its board members on a religious basis, and include religious references in its organization's mission statements and other governing documents in accordance with all program requirements, statutes, and other applicable requirements governing the conduct of HHS-funded activities. 

Regulations pertaining to the Equal Treatment for Faith-Based Organizations, which includes the prohibition against federal funding of inherently religious activities, Understanding the Regulations Related to the Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships Initiative" are available at http://www.hhs.gov/ partnerships/about/r egulations/. Additional information, resources, and tools for faith-based organizations is available through The Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships website at http://www.hhs.gov/ partnerships/index.html and at the Capacity BuildingToolkits for Faith-based and Community Organizations.

Award Term and Condition under the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000

Awards issued under this announcement are subject to the requirements of Section 106 (g) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, as amended (22 U.S.C. § 7104).  For the full text of the award term, go to http://www.acf.hhs.gov /grants/ award-term- and-condition-for-trafficking- in-persons.  If you are unable to access this link, please contact the Grants Management Contact identified in Section VII. Agency Contacts of this announcement to obtain a copy of the term.

Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace

The Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 (41 U.S.C. §§ 8101-8106) requires that all organizations receiving grants from any federal agency agree to maintain a drug-free workplace. By signing the application, the Authorizing Official agrees that the grantee will provide a drug-free workplace and will comply with the requirement to notify ACF if an employee is convicted of violating a criminal drug statute. Failure to comply with these requirements may be cause for debarment. Government-wide requirements for Drug-Free Workplace for Financial Assistance are found in 2 CFR part 182; HHS implementing regulations are set forth in 2 CFR § 382.400. All recipients of ACF grant funds must comply with the requirements in Subpart B - Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals, 2 CFR § 382.225. The rule is available at Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace.

Debarment and Suspension

HHS regulations published in 2 CFR Part 376 implement the governmentwide debarment and suspension system guidance (2 CFR Part 180) for HHS' non-procurement programs and activities. "Non-procurement transactions" include, among other things, grants, cooperative agreements, scholarships, fellowships, and loans. ACF implements the HHS Debarment and Suspension regulations as a term and condition of award. Grantees may decide the method and frequency by which this determination is made and may check the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS) located at https://www.sam.gov/, although checking the EPLS is not required. More information is available at  https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ grants-forms.

Pro-Children Act

The Pro-Children Act of 2001, 20 U.S.C. §§ 7181 through 7184, imposes restrictions on smoking in facilities where federally funded children's services are provided. HHS grants are subject to these requirements only if they meet the Act's specified coverage.  The Act specifies that smoking is prohibited in any indoor facility (owned, leased, or contracted for) used for the routine or regular provision of kindergarten, elementary, or secondary education or library services to children under the age of 18.  In addition, smoking is prohibited in any indoor facility or portion of a facility (owned, leased, or contracted for) used for the routine or regular provision of federally funded health care, day care, or early childhood development, including Head Start services to children under the age of 18.  The statutory prohibition also applies if such facilities are constructed, operated, or maintained with federal funds.  The statute does not apply to children's services provided in private residences, facilities funded solely by Medicare or Medicaid funds, portions of facilities used for inpatient drug or alcohol treatment, or facilities where WIC coupons are redeemed.  Failure to comply with the provisions of the law may result in the imposition of a civil monetary penalty of up to $1,000 per violation and/or the imposition of an administrative compliance order on the responsible entity.

HHS Grants Policy Statement

The HHS Grants Policy Statement (HHS GPS) is the Department of Health and Human Services' single policy guide for discretionary grants and cooperative agreements.  ACF grant awards are subject to the requirements of the HHS GPS, which covers basic grants processes, standard terms and conditions, and points of contact, as well as important agency-specific requirements.  Appendices to the HHS GPS include a glossary of terms and a list of standard abbreviations for ease of reference.  The general terms and conditions in the HHS GPS will apply as indicated unless there are statutory, regulatory, or award-specific requirements to the contrary that are specified in the Notice of Award (NoA). The HHS GPS is available at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ grants/ discretionary-competitive-grants

Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)

Applications funded by federal grant programs are subject to disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. § 552, and are frequently requested under the FOIA.  In accordance with the FOIA requirement to proactively disclose frequently requested materials at 5 U.S.C. § 552(a)(2)(D), and as part of on-going efforts to promote openness in government programs, ACF will post some of the top-ranked applications funded under this FOA in its online FOIA Reading Room at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/ e-reading-room. As required under the FOIA, each of the top-ranked applications will receive appropriate redaction of specific information to protect personal privacy and competitively sensitive commercial information. Applications chosen for posting to the FOIA Reading Room will be placed on the internet website without further notice to the applicants.

VI.3. Reporting

Grantees under this funding opportunity announcement will be required to submit performance progress and financial reports periodically throughout the project period. The frequency of required reporting is listed later in this section.  Final reports may be submitted in hard copy to the Grants Management Office Contact listed in Section VII. Agency Contacts of this announcement.  Instructions on submission of reports electronically will be provided with award documents.

Performance Progress Reports (PPR)

Notice of Award documents will inform grantees of the appropriate performance progress report form or format to use.  Grantees should consult their Notice of Award documents to determine the appropriate performance progress report format required under their award.  Performance progress reports are due 30 days after the end of the reporting period.

Final program performance reports are due 90 days after the close of the project period.  For awards that implement the use of the SF-PPR, that form may be found under "Reporting" at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ grants-forms.

Federal Financial Reports (FFR)

As of February 1, 2011, HHS began the transition from use of the SF-269, Financial Status Report (Short Form or Long Form) to the use of the SF-425 Federal Financial Report for expenditure reporting. SF-269s will no longer be accepted for expenditure reports due after that date. If an SF-269 is submitted, the ACF will return it and require the recipient to complete the SF-425.

The transition strategy is allowing individual HHS Operating Divisions to select--from a limited number of options--the approach that best fits their programs and business process. This transition does not affect completion or submission of the cash reporting to the HHS Division of Payment Management's Payment Management System (PMS). The primary features of this transition for recipients are that OPDIVs that previously required electronic submission of the SF-269 will receive the SF-425 expenditure reports electronically and, until further notice, OPDIVs that have been receiving expenditure reports in hard copy will continue to do so.

All expenditure reports will be due on one of the standard due dates by which cash reporting is required to be submitted to PMS or at the end of a calendar quarter as determined by the Operating Division. As a result, a recipient that receives awards from more than one OPDIV may be subject to more than one approach, but will not be required to change its current means of submission or be subjected to more than eight standard due dates.

Beginning with budget periods which end from January 1 - March 31, 2011, and for all budget periods thereafter, all affected ACF grantees will be required to submit an SF-425 report as frequently as is required in the terms and conditions of their award using due dates for reports to PMS.
 

For budget periods ending in the months of:

The FFR (SF-425) is due to ACF on:

January 01 through March 31

April 30

April 01 through June 30

July 30

July 01 through September 30

October 30

October 01 through December 31

January 30


Fillable versions of the SF-425 form in Adobe PDF and MS-Excel formats, along with instructions, are available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/ omb/ grants_forms, www.forms.gov, and on at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ grants-forms. Further instructions will be provided, as necessary, with award terms and conditions that will address specific reporting periods and due dates on an award-by-award basis.

For planning purposes, ACF reporting periods for awards made under this announcement are as follows:

 
Program Progress Reports: Semi-Annually
Financial Reports: Semi-Annually

Awards issued as a result of this funding opportunity may be subject to the Transparency Act subaward and executive compensation reporting requirements of 2 CFR Part 170.  See ACF's Award Term for Federal Financial Accountability and Transparency Act (FFATA) Subaward and Executive Compensation Reporting Requirement implementing this requirement and additional award applicability information at https:// www.acf.hhs.gov/ grants/ discretionary-competitive-grants.

SF-428 Tangible Property Report and SF-429 Real Property Status Report


As of April 1, 2012, the Administration for Children and Families has been requiring the use of the SF-428 (Tangible Personal Property Form) as well as the SF-429 (Real Property Status Report).

The SF-428 is a standard form used by awarding agencies to collect information related to tangible personal property (equipment and supplies) when required by a federal financial assistance award. The form consists of the cover sheet, SF-428, and three attachments to be used as required: Annual Report; Final (Award Closeout) Report and a Disposition Request/Report. A Supplemental Sheet, SF-428S, may be used to provide detailed individual item information.

The SF-429 is a standard report used by recipients of federal financial assistance to report real property status (Attachment A) or to request agency instructions on real property (Attachments B, C) that has been/will be provided as Government Furnished Property (GFP) or acquired (i.e., purchased or constructed) in whole or in part under a federal financial assistance award (i.e., grant, cooperative agreement, etc.). This includes real property that was improved using federal funds and real property that was donated to a federal project in the form of a match or cost share donation. This report is used for awards that establish a federal Interest on real property.

Beginning with budget periods ending September 30, 2012, and for all budget periods thereafter, all ACF grantees are required to submit (as applicable) an SF-428 and SF-429 report as frequently as required in the terms and conditions of their award(s).


The forms are available at http:// www.whitehouse.gov/ omb/ grants_forms.

VII. Agency Contacts

Program Office Contact

Matthew McGuire
Children's Bureau
Portals Building
1250 Maryland Ave SW
Washington, DC 20024
Phone: (202) 205-7270
Email: matthew.mcguire@acf.hhs.gov
 

Office of Grants Management Contact

Robin Bunch
CB Operations Center
c/o Lux Consulting Group
8405 Colesville Road, Suite 600
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (866) 796-1591
Email: cb@luxcg.com
 

Federal Relay Service:

Hearing-impaired and speech-impaired callers may contact the Federal Relay Service for assistance at 1-800-877-8339 (TTY - Text Telephone or ASCII - American Standard Code For Information Interchange).

VIII. Other Information

Reference Websites


U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) on the Internet http:// www.hhs.gov/.

Administration for Children and Families (ACF) on the Internet http:// www.acf.hhs.gov/.

Administration for Children and Families - GRANTS homepage https:// www.acf.hhs.gov /grants.           

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) https:// www.cfda.gov/.

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)  http:// www.gpo.gov.  

United States Code (U.S.C.)  http:// www.gpoaccess.gov /uscode/ .

All required Standard Forms (SF), assurances, and certifications are available on the ACF Grants-Forms page at https:// www.acf.hhs.gov /grants -forms.

Grants.gov Forms Repository webpage at http://www.grants.gov /agencies / aforms_repository_information .jsp.

Versions of other Standard Forms (SF) are available on the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Grants Management Forms web site at

http:// www. whitehouse.gov /omb /grants_forms/.

For information regarding accessibility issues, visit the Grants.gov Accessibility Compliance Page at http:// www07.grants.gov /aboutgrants / accessibility_compliance.jsp.

Sign up to receive notification of ACF Funding Opportunities at www.Grants.gov

http:// www.grants.gov / applicants /email_subscription.jsp.

Application Checklist

Applicants may use the checklist below as a guide when preparing your application package.
 
What to Submit Where Found When to Submit

SF-424 - Application for Federal Assistance

and

SF-P/PSL - Project/Performance Site Location(s)

Referenced in Section IV.2.Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications. Found at 

http://www.acf.hhs.gov/ grants-forms

and at the Grants.gov Forms Repository at

http://www.grants.gov/ agencies/ aforms_repository_information.jsp.

Submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times.

SF-424A - Budget Information - Non-Construction Programs

and

SF-424B - Assurances - Non-Construction Programs

Referenced in Section IV.2. Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications. Found at

http://www. acf.hhs.gov /grants-forms.

For electronic application submission, these forms are available on the FOA's Grants.gov "Download Opportunity Instructions and Application" page under "Download Application Package" in the section entitled, "Optional Documents."

These forms are required for applications under this FOA:

  • Projects that include only non-construction activities must submit the SF-424A and SF-424B, along with the SF-424 and SF-P/PSL.

Submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times.

DUNS Number (Universal Identifier) and Systems for Award Management (SAM) registration..

Referenced in Section III.3. Other in the announcement. To obtain a DUNS number, go to
http:// fedgov. dnb.com/ webform.

To register at SAM, go to 

http:// www.sam. gov.

A DUNS number and registration at SAM.gov are required for
all applicants. Active registration
at SAM must be maintained throughout the application and
project award period.

Certification Regarding Lobbying

Referenced in Section IV.2. Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications. Found at

http:// www.acf.hhs.gov /grants-forms

Submission is due with the application package. If it is not submitted
with the application package, it may also be submitted prior to the
award of a grant.

SF-LLL - Disclosure of Lobbying Activities

"Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying" is referenced in Section IV.2. Required Forms, Assurances, and Certifications. Found at
http://www. acf.hhs.gov /grants-forms
.

If applicable, submission of this form is required if any funds have been paid, or will be paid, to any person for influencing, or attempting to influence, an officer or employee of any agency, a member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a member of Congress in connection with this commitment providing for the United States to insure or guarantee a loan.

If applicable, submission of this form is applicable,
it is due prior at the time of application.  It may also be
submitted prior to the award of a grant.

Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants

Non-profit private organizations (not including private universities) are encouraged to submit the survey with their applications. Applicants applying electronically, may submit this survey along with the application as part of the appendix or as a separate document. Applicants submitting in paper, please place the completed survey in an envelope labeled "Applicant Survey." Seal the envelope and include it along with the application package.

The survey is referenced in Section IV.2. The survey may be found at
https://www .acf.hhs.gov /grants-forms
.

The survey will not count in the page limitations.

Submission is voluntary.
Submission may be made with the application by the application due date listed in the Overview
and Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times.  Or, it may be submitted prior to the award of a grant.

The Project Description

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description.  This is the title for the project narrative that describes the applicant's plan for the project.

Submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times.

Table of Contents

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description

Submission is due as part of the Project Description by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times.

Project Summary/Abstract

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description. The Project Summary/Abstract is limited to one single-spaced page.

Submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times.

The Project Budget and Budget Justification

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Budget and Budget Justification of the announcement.

Submission of the Project Budget is required on the appropriate Standard Form (424A or 424C) is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times.

Proof of Non-Profit Status

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description, Legal Status of Applicant Entity

Proof of non-profit status should be submitted with the application package by the due date listed in the Overview and Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times.  If it is not available at the time of application submission, it must be submitted prior to the award of a grant.

Logic Model

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description.  

Submission is due with the application package by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times.

Third-Party Agreements

Referenced in Section IV.2. Project Description.

If available, submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.3
If not available at the time of application submission, due by the time of award.

Executive Order 12372, "Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs," 

and

45 CFR Part 100, "Intergovernmental Review of Department of Health and Human Services Programs and Activities" 

Applicants should go to the following URL for the official list of the jurisdictions that have elected to participate in E.O. 12372

http://www. whitehouse.gov /omb /grants_spoc/

as indicated in Section IV.4. Intergovernmental Review of this announcement.  The Executive Order and CFR require that applicants submit all required application materials to their State Single Point of Contact (SPOC) and indicate the date of submission on the SF-424 at item 19.

Submission of application materials is due to SPOC by the application due date listed in the Overview and in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times.

Project Sustainability Plan

Referenced in Section IV.2. The Project Description

Submission is due by the application due date found in the Overview and in Section IV.3. Submission Dates and Times.

Appendices