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Compendium Child Abuse and Neglect

Published: December 31, 2001
Categories:
Funding
Topics:
CAPTA, Child Abuse & Neglect, Grants
Tags:
, Discretionary Grants and Cooperative Agreements

Child Abuse and Neglect Discretionary Activities

The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) [42 USC 5105] funds discretionary research, evaluation and assistance activities designed to provide information needed to better protect children from abuse or neglect and to improve the well-being of abused or neglected children.

This section of the Compendium describes the 15 Child Abuse and Neglect Discretionary Activities projects funded in FY 2001 under the following priority areas:

2001B.1: National Research Center on Child Maltreatment
2001B.2: Investigator-Initiated Research Advancing the State of the Art in the Field of Child Abuse and Neglect
2001B.3: Field-Initiated Demonstration Projects Advancing the State of the Art in the Field of Child Abuse and Neglect
2001B.4: Quality Improvement Centers on Child Protective Services
2000B.5: Evaluations of Existing Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention or Intervention Programs

Priority Area 2001B.1
National Research Center on Child Maltreatment

Grantee Name: Child Welfare Institute
Address: 3950 Shackleford Road
Suite 175
Duluth, GA 30096
Principal Contact Person: Thomas D. Morton
Telephone: 770-935-8484
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $700,000.00
Grant Number: 90CA1682
Project Period: 36 months
Federal Project Officer: Jan Shafer
Telephone: 202-205-8172
Target Population: Child welfare providers
Geographical Area Served: Nationwide
Region: IV

The National Resource Center on Child Maltreatment (NRCCM) will provide training and technical assistance services to state, local, and tribal child protection agencies. Training and technical assistance will be based on needs identified by agencies in collaboration with the Children's Bureau Regional offices. Agencies may receive up to 10 days of training and technical assistance services each year at no cost to the agency based on federal approval. Priority for such requests will be given to those emanating from state child and family service reviews. Additionally, the NRCCM will conduct an annual leadership initiative designed to synthesize available information concerning an area of practice, program design, or policy that presents an impediment to improved effectiveness of children's protective services.

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Priority Area 2001B.2
Investigator-Initiated Research
Advancing the State of the Art
in the Field of Child Abuse and Neglect

Grantee Name: The Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Address: MB 502 MC551
809 South Marshfield Avenue
Chicago, IL 60612 7205
Principal Contact Person: James Gleeson
Telephone: 312-996-0042
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $250,000.00
Grant Number: 90CA1683
Project Period: 36 months
Federal Project Officer: Mary Bruce Webb
Telephone: 202-205-8628
Target Population: Kinship care providers
Geographical Area Served: Chicago
Region: V

The Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Grand Boulevard Federation will conduct a 3-year study of 300 families caring for related children in informal kinship care arrangements. The study plans to identify the strengths, resources, and service needs of kin who care for children who cannot be cared for by their biological parents, and describe changes over time. The study also tests the hypotheses that the child's temperament, caregiver stress, functioning of the care-giving family, social support, and financial and material resources predict both changes in the child's behavioral functioning (a proxy for well-being) and the stability of the child's living arrangement over an 18-month period. Open-ended qualitative interviews also will be conducted with a sub-sample of the children and will examine their conceptions of family, their sense of belonging, the degree to which they feel a part of the family, and their sense of stability and permanence. In addition, in-depth, qualitative interviews will be conducted with a sub-sample of the children's biological mothers and fathers to examine their perceptions of the reasons that their children are living with kin, their satisfaction and dissatisfaction with kinship care, and their perceptions of their role in the child's life and in the life of the family providing a home for the child.

Grantee Name: New York University School of Medicine
Address: 550 First Avenue
New York, NY 10016
Principal Contact Person: Lourdes Linares
Telephone: 212-263-8847
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $250,000.00
Grant Number: 90CA1687
Project Period: 36 months
Federal Project Officer: Mary Bruce Webb
Telephone: 202-205-8628
Target Population: Children in foster care
Geographical Area Served:  
Region: II

This study examines the course of the sibling relationships among maltreated siblings in foster care in different placement conditions (intact or split). Intact placement is defined as having siblings under the care of Child Protection Services (CPS) and living in the foster care setting; split placement refers to one or more siblings separated from the others. The focus of this study will be the assessment of sibling relationships, as a mediating variable between placement condition and subsequent behavior problems, and placement disruption for maltreated siblings entering foster care for the first time. This observational study will afford the examination of the contribution of placement decisions, a critical child welfare policy, and sibling (warmth/closeness; relative status/power) and negativity (conflict and rivalry, competition) within 4-8 weeks from first entry into care (Time 1), on behavioral functioning, and placement disruption 12 months later (Time 2) among maltreated siblings placed in a leading child welfare agency in New York City, the New York Foundling Hospital (NYFH). This 3-year study will use a repeated measures design to assess the influence of placement conditions, and sibling relationships, on sibling behavior. The key independent variables are placement condition and quality of the sibling relationship. The sibling outcomes are behavior functioning and placement disruption. Other potential influences adjusted for statistically in the study are family background, sibling configuration (gender, age spacing), differential treatment, and mental disorder. The sample will consist of 76 high-risk groups of children, 3-11 years of age, who are sequentially admitted and placed in foster care at NYFH in intact or split placement conditions upon entering foster care.

Grantee Name: University of Virginia, Department of Psychology
Address: P.O. Box 400400
Charlottesville, VA 22904 4400
Principal Contact Person: Charlotte Patterson
Telephone: 434-924-0664
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $130,961.00
Grant Number: 90CA1688
Project Period: 36 months
Federal Project Officer: Mary Bruce Webb
Telephone: 202-205-8628
Target Population: Maltreated children
Geographical Area Served: Nationwide
Region: III

The overall objectives of the proposed research are to illuminate the links between maltreatment and children's developmental outcomes, and to identify the processes by which some maltreated children develop more successful adaptations than others despite their troubled early experiences. These objectives will be achieved by drawing on the resources of an existing longitudinal study of social and personal adjustment among children who have been maltreated. Drawing on existing data from the Charlottesville Longitudinal Study, including data on children who have been maltreated, the proposed research will make research data available to researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers in the fields of child abuse and neglect in a cost-effective and timely manner.

Grantee Name: University of Rochester
Address: 187 Edinburgh Street
Rochester, NY 14608
Principal Contact Person: Jody Manly
Telephone: 716-454-2972
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $249,365.00
Grant Number: 90CA1684
Project Period: 36 months
Federal Project Officer: Mary Bruce Webb
Telephone: 202-205-8628
Target Population: Maltreated children
Geographical Area Served: Rochester and Monroe Counties
Region: II

This project will build upon a previously funded early intervention demonstration project that was implemented to provide family support and to ameliorate the functioning of young victims of abuse and neglect. This proposal will build upon the successes of the project by examining the impact on children and families to determine the factors that empower them to become more successful contributors to their communities, thus providing a cost-effective solution to child neglect. The design of the current project offers a number of benefits that will improve the knowledge base on the treatment of neglectful families and inform social policy decisions related to child neglect. To assess the efficacy of the psycho-educational intervention approach, the project incorporates rigorous treatment evaluation by comparing three groups: 1) families receiving the intervention; 2) families receiving less intensive services typically available in the community; and 3) families who have not been characterized by maltreatment. These families will be evaluated when the children are of school age, thereby providing an assessment of the durability of treatment results and continuing an examination of factors related to neglect that have an impact on school functioning. Thus, a sophisticated evaluation strategy will augment prior assessments with a later school-age assessment, resulting in evaluations at four periods--at intake, following the intervention, at a 1-year follow-up, and at age 8), thereby providing comprehensive information related to project success and growth curves over time. Moreover, the investigators of the project are in a position to share results of the project with others in multiple disciplines nationally, which will give the project the broad applicability and practical utility for others striving to improve the lives of neglected children and their families.

Grantee Name: University of Southern California
Address: MRP 313
Los Angeles, CA 90089
Principal Contact Person: Penelope Trickett
Telephone: 213-740-8018
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $250,000.00
Grant Number: 90CA1686
Project Period: 36 months
Federal Project Officer: Mary Bruce Webb
Telephone: 202-205-8628
Target Population: Sexually abused children
Geographical Area Served: Los Angeles and Washington, DC
Region:  

This project will continue a 14-year longitudinal study of the impact of childhood sexual abuse on female development in order to follow the entire sample into young adulthood. The focus of this study is on developmental tasks that are especially salient for women in their twenties. Specifically, this study will examine how child sexual abuse affects the development of interpersonal relationships; the development of sexuality, including reproductive decision-making and pregnancy timing and rates; parenting styles and stress; and mother-child relationships. It will also examine how variables, such as depression, dissociation, and PTSD, may mediate the relationship of child sexual abuse to some young adulthood outcomes (e.g., reproductive decision making, parenting style). The extent to which outcomes in young adulthood can be mitigated by intervening factors measured earlier in development, such as emotional support by family and peers and treatment, and contextual factors including the experience of subsequent trauma will also be examined. The sample (N=166) consists of females sexually abused by a family member and a non-abused comparison group. Initially, the sample ranged in age from 6 to 16 (median=11) and will range from 18 to 31 (median=23) at the start of this protocol. The overall goals are to work toward a comprehensive theory of the developmental consequences of child sexual abuse and to develop and disseminate knowledge to inform policies and programs aimed at improving interventions designed to mitigate the adverse impact of childhood sexual abuse and to prevent intergenerational transmission of child maltreatment.

Grantee Name: Medical University of South Carolina
Address: 171 Ashley Avenue
Charleston, SC 29425
Principal Contact Person: Daniel Smith
Telephone: 843-792-2945
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $210,608.00
Grant Number: 90CA1689
Project Period: 36 months
Federal Project Officer: Mary Bruce Webb
Telephone: 202-205-8628
Target Population: Sexually abused children
Geographical Area Served: Charleston, Berkeley, and Dorchester Counties
Region: IV

Maternal support following child sexual abuse has been deemed of critical importance by clinicians attempting to intervene with victims, caseworkers making decision regarding child safety, and researchers attempting to predict child outcome. The National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center at the Medical University of South Carolina, in conjunction with a local child advocacy center and expert consultants, will develop maternal and child-report measures of abuse-specific maternal support to be used in clinical practice and future research. A two-wave longitudinal study will be conducted in which 210 mother-child pairs will complete assessments, including a structured interview. The focal hypotheses of the study addresses the psychometric analysis of the measures, identifying the relations among abuse-related maternal support and overall mother-child relationship quality, examining the ability of abuse-related maternal support variables to predict child adjustment concurrently and longitudinally, and exploring between group differences on maternal support variables for African American, white, and Hispanic families and for victims of incestuous and non-incestuous sexual abuse.

Grantee Name: University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Address: 4200 East 9th Avenue
Denver, CO 80262
Principal Contact Person: Robert Clyman
Telephone: 303-864-5848
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $249,103.00
Grant Number: 90CA1685
Project Period: 36 months
Federal Project Officer: Mary Bruce Webb
Telephone: 202-205-8628
Target Population: Infants in foster care
Geographical Area Served: Statewide
Region: VIII

Infants are a large and growing proportion of the children who enter out-of-home placements; 25% of all children who enter placement are under 12 months. They are less likely to reunify with their birth parents than older children and have substantial unmet needs for services to improve their emotional, behavioral, developmental, and physical well-being. These infants are in great need of effective intervention services to increase their safety, the odds they will have a permanent home, and their well-being. This project will test the effectiveness of an intervention program to improve the safety, permanency, and well-being of infants who enter out-of-home placement. This proposal will attempt to recruit all infants 18 months of age and younger who enter placement in the city and county of Denver, and provide services, and evaluate them, for 12 months. Twenty percent of them infants will be randomized to an intensive home-based intervention, and the control group will receive free developmental evaluations and referrals. The project will use a multi-method approach to examining outcomes, including the use of sophisticated observational assessments of parenting and child emotional development. The hypotheses will be tested to determine whether infants who receive the intensive intervention will have lower rates of re-entry into care, fewer placement changes, and improved emotional, behavioral, developmental, and physical well-being.

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Priority Area 2001B.3
Field-Initiated Demonstration Projects
Advancing the State of the Art
in the Field of Child Abuse and Neglect

Grantee Name: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Address: 3615 Civic Center Boulevard
Philadephia, PA 19104 4318
Principal Contact Person: Judith Silver
Telephone: 215-590-7723
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $231,945.00
Grant Number: 90CA1697
Project Period: 48 months
Federal Project Officer: Tanya R. Howell
Telephone: 202-205-8714
Target Population: Neglected infants and children
Geographical Area Served: Philadelphia
Region: III

The objective of this proposed model demonstration project is to reduce the incidence of medical neglect in infants and toddlers by providing direct services and supports to the children and their caregivers, and to evaluate the model by conducting health outcome assessments. Additionally, the project will focus on identifying specific factors in the health care and child welfare systems that limit children's actual receipt of medical services. The project will implement an interdisciplinary pediatric developmental follow-up program, in collaboration with a consortium of child welfare provider agencies and the county's early intervention service coordination agency. The program will provide comprehensive evaluations for children less than 3 years of age, with direct enrollment into early intervention services for children with delays and disabilities. A medical care coordinator will facilitate access to medical specialists for children with special health care needs. The program will provide educational programs for child welfare professionals.

Grantee Name: University of Maryland, Baltimore
Address: 520 Lombard St.
First Floor
Baltimore, MD 21201
Principal Contact Person: Howard Dubowitz
Telephone: 410-706-4294
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $250,000.00
Grant Number: 90CA1695
Project Period: 48 months
Federal Project Officer: Tanya R. Howell
Telephone: 202-205-8714
Target Population: Maltreated children
Geographical Area Served: Baltimore
Region: III

This demonstration project will utilize routine pediatric care as a strategy to prevent child maltreatment, including physical abuse and neglect. However, sexual abuse is not a focus of this study. Routine pediatric care offers an excellent opportunity to prevent injury and disease and ensure children's well-being and safety. The proposed project will demonstrate a model that converts this model ideal into practice. This project involves training pediatricians to identify families at high risk for child maltreatment. The project involves pediatric residents, training to be pediatricians, who will receive intensive initial training, as well as booster sessions. The project also will have a Model Care clinic, which will screen families in a primary care clinic for checkups, conduct pediatric assessment of problems, perform social worker intervention, and collaborate with community resources. The interventions will be rigorously evaluated. Half the pediatric residents in the training program will be specially trained and will work in the Model Care clinic. The others will continue to provide standard care. The project will evaluate the impact of training on pediatricians' awareness, attitudes, knowledge, level of comfort, and practice and also will evaluate the effectiveness of the Model Care upon screening practices.

Grantee Name: Montefiore Medical Center
Address: 111 East 210th Street
Bronx, NY 10467
Principal Contact Person: Mary Pulido
Telephone: 718-920-5833
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $250,000.00
Grant Number: 90CA1690
Project Period: 48 months
Federal Project Officer: Tanya R. Howell
Telephone: 202-205-8714
Target Population: Abused children and their families
Geographical Area Served: Bronx
Region: II

The Parent Empowerment Program 2 (PEP 2) will build upon the social support intervention approach utilized in the first Parent Empowerment Program to prevent the incidence and recurrence of child abuse and neglect by utilizing a psychosocial parenting model with micro-level support and cognitive-behavioral interventions to address the serious mental health problems of the participating parents. The enhanced model combines parenting education, social support, and mental health services to strengthen the parenting skills and coping methods of pregnant and parenting young mothers who are at risk of child maltreatment. The project will be implemented in the South Bronx of New York City, an area with an extremely high rate of child abuse and neglect reports. Participants will be recruited from the South Bronx Children's Health Center and from local social service providers in the targeted community. PEP 2 is a 6-month, community-based therapeutic parenting group that will meet weekly and will allow for peer interaction and peer support. The curriculum topics include child development, well baby care, self-esteem, empowerment, building a social support system, stress management, substance abuse prevention, appropriate discipline techniques, and domestic violence assessment and intervention. Transportation and child care will be provided to the participants. The Maternal Social Support Index, the Child Abuse Potential Index, the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale 2, the Beck Depression Inventory II, and the Personal Goal Attainment Measure will be administered and analyzed to measure the project's effectiveness and impact on the families served. The findings will be disseminated to researchers and practitioners in the field of child abuse and neglect.

Grantee Name: American Prosecutors Research Institute
Address: 99 Canal Center Plaza
Suite 510
Alexandria, VA 22314
Principal Contact Person: Debra Whitcomb
Telephone: 703-519-1675
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $250,000.00
Grant Number: 90CA1693
Project Period: 48 months
Federal Project Officer: Tanya R. Howell
Telephone: 202-205-8714
Target Population: Child abuse professionals
Geographical Area Served: Nationwide
Region: III

The American Prosecutors Research Institute (APRI), in partnership with CornerHouse Interagency Child Abuse Evaluation and Training Center, has developed an intensive, five-day course that instructs teams of child abuse professionals in the art of interviewing children about abuse and defending that interview in court. Grounded in science and continually updated to reflect new research, Finding Words is the most comprehensive training program available today. APRI also has launched Half a Nation by 2010, a systematic strategy to replicate and institutionalize Finding Words on a national scale. APRI proposes to demonstrate and evaluate this innovative strategy. The goals of the proposed demonstration program are to replicate and institutionalize Finding Words in eight states over the four-year project period, reaching as many as 960 child abuse professionals; to evaluate the effectiveness of Finding Words in improving interviewers' knowledge, skills, and their ability to prepare better cases; and to document and disseminate the progress of Finding Words to support the goal of reaching Half a Nation by 2010. Jurisdictions, whose interviewers have received this training, should experience increased rates of substantiation, prosecution, and conviction in child sexual abuse cases. Greater numbers of abused children will gain admission to a system that can protect them, and more child abusers will receive treatment and punishment offered by the criminal justice system.

Grantee Name: YMCA of San Diego County
Address: 4715 Viewridge Avenue
Suite 101
San Diego, CA 92123
Principal Contact Person: Laura Mustari
Telephone: 619-543-9850
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $250,000.00
Grant Number: 90CA1694
Project Period: 48 months
Federal Project Officer: Tanya R. Howell
Telephone: 202-205-8714
Target Population: Abused children and their families
Geographical Area Served: San Diego County
Region: IX

Because the 92,284 cases of child abuse reported to County of San Diego Child Protective Services each year represent only between one-half and two-thirds of the actual number of children being abused by the adults in their lives, this project seeks to increase the knowledge of children and adults about positive parenting in order to reduce family violence, to provide support to children who are encouraged to report their abuse, and to provide intervention and counseling for children and adults living in abusive homes. The project will serve 2,000 low-income, high-risk children and youth annually with a "pre-parenting" curriculum delivered through YMCA after-school programs in North Central, South, and Central Regions of San Diego County; inform parents of program features; and, provide services and referrals through neighborhood Family Resource Centers and YMCA facilities.

Grantee Name: Children's Hospital and Health Center
Address: 3020 Children's Way MC 5093
San Diego, CA 92123 4282
Principal Contact Person: Meg Norton
Telephone: 858-966-4006
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $249,988.00
Grant Number: 90CA1691
Project Period: 48 months
Federal Project Officer: Tanya R. Howell
Telephone: 202-205-8714
Target Population: Families at risk for child abuse
Geographical Area Served: San Diego County
Region: IX

Children's Hospital and Health Center (CHHC) in San Diego, California will design, establish, and test the Strategic Therapeutic Parenting (STP) Program that will introduce professionally led therapeutic parenting group support for high-risk families with a history of intimate partner violence (IPV) into the well-established Family Support Program of the Center for Child Protection (CCP). Founded in 1976, CCP has since grown into one of the largest, most comprehensive child and family violence programs in the nation. The STP program will build on the experience of CCP and community partners in providing clinical mental health services to families affected by child abuse and intimate partner violence. The STP program will work through CCP's Trauma Counseling (TC) and Family Support (FSP) Programs. TC uses a cognitive-based, trauma focused model to treat abuse victims individually and in groups. The FSP provides an array of in-home and group services, supportive and educational, to families at high risk of abuse and neglect. The proposed project is drawn from professional literature that illustrates the co-occurrence of child abuse and intimate partner violence, as well as from the equivocal results emerging from studies on the efficacy of parenting services delivered exclusively through traditional home visiting programs. The project also draws upon practical experience with the existing parenting group component of CCP's Family Support Program. Working with colleagues throughout the nation and the community, CCP proposes to carefully examine the challenges and opportunities of establishing a coordinated therapeutic parenting program.

Grantee Name: Children's Institute International
Address: 711 South New Hampshire Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90005
Principal Contact Person: Hershel Swinger
Telephone: 213-385-5100
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $250,000.00
Grant Number: 90CA1692
Project Period: 48 months
Federal Project Officer: Tanya R. Howell
Telephone: 202-205-8714
Target Population: Fathers
Geographical Area Served: Los Angeles County
Region: IX

The Children's Institute International's Project Fatherhood offers fathers a comprehensive, therapeutic program providing effective, efficient services in an mutually supportive environment that promotes group interaction, accountability, and role models. Project Fatherhood's evidence-based program promotes positive, responsible parenting and addresses traumatic experiences in the fathers' backgrounds that continue to affect their relationships with their children and partners. In addition to resolving early childhood traumas, men learn basic child development principles, parenting skills, and appropriate methods of discipline in order to strengthen their relationships with their children, provide more nurturing and competent care, prevent child abuse and neglect, and avoid court supervision and out of home care of their children. By developing the parenting skills of fathers, their children should experience improved self-esteem and diminished behavioral problems. Representatives of other local child and family service agencies will participate in 'train the trainer' sessions and then replicate the Project Fatherhood model at their organizations. Finally, formalization, publication, and distribution of the Project Fatherhood curriculum will benefit professionals, fathers, and children nationwide and will allow mental health and child welfare professionals to more competently serve fathers and children in the child welfare system.

Grantee Name: Center for Child Protection and Family Support, Inc.
Address: 714 G Street, S.E.
Washington, DC 20003
Principal Contact Person: Joyce Thomas
Telephone: 202-544-3144
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $250,000.00
Grant Number: 90CA1696
Project Period: 48 months
Federal Project Officer: Tanya R. Howell
Telephone: 202-205-8714
Target Population: Mothers receiving TANF
Geographical Area Served: District of Columbia
Region: III

The Center for Child Protection and Family Support, Inc. will conduct a demonstration project that focuses on the prevention and intervention of child abuse and neglect among primarily African American mothers receiving Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) and their children, aged 0-6 years, who reside in high-risk neighborhoods in the southeast quadrant of the District of Columbia. The project will develop links between community-based social services agencies, Head Start providers, and other child care centers to strengthen the parenting skills of at-risk families involved in Welfare to Work and TANF job training program. The primary intent of this effort is to design and implement a culturally competent comprehensive approach for the prevention of child abuse and neglect in African American families who are most likely to be reported to child protective services.

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Priority Area 2001B.4
Quality Improvement Centers on
Child Protective Services

Grantee Name: University of Utah
Address: 1471 Federal Way
Salt Lake City, UT 84102
Principal Contact Person: Norma J. Harris
Telephone: 801-581-3822
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $170,984.00
Grant Number: 90CA1701
Project Period: 60 months
Federal Project Officer: Catherine Nolan
Telephone: 202-260-5140
Target Population: Child welfare practitioners
Geographical Area Served: Utah, Nevada, New Mexico, and Colorado
Region: VIII

The Social Research Institute (SRI) of the University of Utah Graduate School of Social Work will create, implement and evaluate a Quality Improvement Center (QIC) on Child Protective Services (CPS). Through prior grants, SRI has established a consortium that includes Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. An advisory committee has been recruited; all are experts in CPS and reflect the diversity of the area. The advisory committee will guide all aspects of the QIC, which includes assisting in setting goals and objectives, selecting the focus for the evidence-based research grants, and developing the implementation plan. Once the research focus has been identified, QIC will create protocols to guide the development of Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and grant review criteria to accomplish wide distribution of the RFPs. An independent review panel will be convened to review grant submissions and to make recommendations. Once grants are awarded, QIC staff will provide ongoing consultation to those awarded grants. QIC will develop, implement, and update a website that will provide summaries of all results. The long-term impacts of this effort will be that CPS practices will be improved; measures of practice and improvement will be more firmly established; enhanced collaborative efforts will result in improved services; and evidence-based practice will become the standard for CPS agencies and practitioners.

Grantee Name: University of Kentucky Research Foundation
Address: 201 Kinkead Hall
Lexington, KY 40506-0057
Principal Contact Person: Jack Supplee
Telephone: 859-257-9420
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $175,000.00
Grant Number: 90CA1698
Project Period: 60 months
Federal Project Officer: Catherine Nolan
Telephone: 202-260-5140
Target Population: Child welfare practitioners
Geographical Area Served: Nationwide
Region: IV

The University of Kentucky College of Social Work Training Resource Center, through its Quality Improvement Center on Child Protective Services, will utilize working partnerships between child protection agencies in 10 states in the rural south and university social work programs to support and evaluate innovative projects in each region within a Learning Lab Model. The Center will be guided by an advisory board comprised of representatives from each state and includes a mixture of public child welfare administrators, university faculty, parents, and community partners. Through the use of teams of mentors comprised of members of the advisory board assigned to each funded project. Practitioners will have the benefit of knowledge in child protection and research expertise to inform and support their work, which will generate evidence-based practice approaches to benefit the entire field. The Learning Labs and the advisory board will have an ongoing dialogue with one another and board members through the creative use of technology and video-conferencing. This approach will promote long-lasing capacity in the region that will be sustained beyond the grant period by building partnerships between public child welfare agencies, universities, and community agencies. The training and technical assistance that will be provided by the university, in concert with the advisory board and the Children's Bureau, will promote collaborative problem-solving and a strong foundation for program evaluation and yield results, which can be disseminated throughout the country for use by administrators, researchers, and practitioners.

Grantee Name: University of Washington
Address: 4101 15th Avenue, NE
Seattle, WA 98105 6299
Principal Contact Person: Katharine Cahn
Telephone: 206-685-1675
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $155,556.00
Grant Number: 90CA1700
Project Period: 60 months
Federal Project Officer: Catherine Nolan
Telephone: 202-260-5140
Target Population: Child welfare practitioners
Geographical Area Served: Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Alaska
Region: X

The Northwest Institute for Children and Families will establish a Quality Improvement Center (QIC) program in partnership with child welfare partnerships in Oregon, Alaska, and Idaho that will increase the effectiveness of front-line child protective services in the Northwest and nationally. The objectives of the project include developing a needs assessment and literature review that identifies resources and service gaps for the region and sites of readiness to change, selection of a focus for quality improvement for the region, selection and funding of demonstration projects consistent with the focus, monitoring and evaluating of the effectiveness of the demonstration projects, and disseminating project findings and research methodologies within the region and nationally. A Regional Advisory Group will be formed and will be composed of child welfare administrators and representatives from the African American community and Indian child welfare. A consortium of evaluators and one of grantees will ensure networking and replicability. During phase I, the QIC will establish the focus for a quality improvement initiative with diverse stakeholder input. The Regional Advisory Group and staff will develop a plan for announcing, awarding, monitoring, and evaluating research and demonstration grants to local sites. A competitive Request for Proposals will be released, and conferences will launch the initiative. Site selection will be based on potential to improve CPS practice. After selection, grantees will meet regularly to consult and exchange information. Evaluators will provide technical assistance to project sites to assist them in collecting appropriate qualitative and quantitative data to assess their progress and results. The center will manage the dissemination of project findings through the National Resource Centers and Clearinghouses, as well as through professional conferences, presentations, on a website, and other venues.

Grantee Name: American Humane Association
Address: 63 Inverness Drive East
Englewood, CO 80112
Principal Contact Person: Kim Murphy
Telephone: 303-792-9900
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $157,492.00
Grant Number: 90CA1699
Project Period: 60 months
Federal Project Officer: Catherine Nolan
Telephone: 202-260-5140
Target Population: Child welfare practitioners
Geographical Area Served: Arizona, Montana, Wyoming, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, and Alaska
Region: VIII

The American Humane Association (AHA) will develop and operate a Child Protective Services (CPS) Quality Improvement Center (QIC) for the Rocky Mountain States. Being geographically contiguous and sharing a "Western" identity, the states share several demographic characteristics, such as their low child population per square mile and the racial and ethnic similarity of Native American and Hispanic peoples. The Advisory Group for the project is broadly representative of the region. The five objectives of the proposal are to establish a consortium of collaborative partnerships, conduct a needs assessment, identify and select a topic of focus, build capacity for monitoring results, and disseminate results to partners in order to enhance future collaboration. This proposal has a 1-year planning phase to develop a topic of focus for the QIC. Upon presentation and approval of the topic by the Children's Bureau, a second phase process will commence, which will include disbursement of funds and technical assistance to CPS quality improvement sites in the region, and ongoing technical assistance and program evaluation. This phase will continue for the remainder of the five years of the proposal, which will see the actual implementation of QIC projects with an emphasis on client outcome measures. This work will bring collaborative efforts for improved CPS quality to a region of the country not near major population centers and below the national median on many CPS performance indicators. This work seeks to improve the performance of the region on the CPS indicators.

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Priority Area 2001B.5
Evaluations of Existing Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention or Intervention Programs

Grantee Name: The Research Foundation of SUNY
Address: 1400 Washington Avenue
Albany, NY 12222
Principal Contact Person: Mark P. Abbey
Telephone: 518-437-4554
FY 2001 Federal Funding Level: $100,000.00
Grant Number: 90CA1702
Project Period: 36 months
Federal Project Officer: Catherine Nolan
Telephone: 202-205-8305
Target Population: Child welfare practitioners
Geographical Area Served: Statewide
Region: II

This proposal is a secondary analysis of factors that influence the client retention and effectiveness of New York State's primary child maltreatment prevention program, the Home Visiting Program (HVP). HVP is a manualized intervention that is built upon a national model, Healthy Families America. The investigators have collected data and studied the outcomes of HVP since 1995. The proposal will investigate the role of client, service organization, correspondence between assessed family needs, and delivered services. It is hypothesized that services that are more closely linked with identified family needs will result in better client retention in the program and in better family and child outcomes.

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