< Back to Search

FY2008 Annual Report to Congress

Office of Child Support Enforcement

Published: December 1, 2008
Information About:
State/Local Child Support Agencies, Tribal Child Support Agencies
Topics:
Federal Reporting, OCSE-157 Annual Data Report, OCSE-34A Quarterly Report of Collections, OCSE-396A Financial Report, OCSE-75 Tribal Annual Data Report
Types:
Research & Data, Annual Reports to Congress

Foreword

I am pleased to present the 29th Annual Report to Congress on the Child Support Enforcement (CSE) Program, which describes the status of the program and highlights various accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY) 2008.

FY 2008 marked the culmination of the fourth year of the FY 2005-2009 National CSE Strategic Plan, which helps to direct the course of the CSE Program and to focus work priorities and resources. The program continues to make steady progress toward achieving the goals and objectives of the Plan.

Throughout FY 2008, the program focused on ensuring that child support payments are collected and distributed quickly and appropriately to children and families and that these payments continue to serve as a reliable source of income for those who depend upon them to meet their daily needs. During this fiscal year, almost $27 billion in child support was collected and distributed, a 6.9 percent increase over the amount collected and distributed during FY 2007. Several factors contributed to this notable progress, including enhanced automation, improved effectiveness of the Federal Parent Locator Service, increased collaboration between the CSE Program and other programs, developments in Tribal and International child support programs, and other similar efforts.

As we maintain our strong commitment to the children in the child support caseload, we will continue our efforts to ensure that parents are held responsible for the support of their dependent children. We look forward to continuing our partnership with States, jurisdictions, Tribes, and others who share this commitment to improving the lives and well-being of our nation’s children.

Kathleen Sebelius

I. Background

The Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) is part of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The mission of ACF is to promote the economic and social well-being of children, families, youth, and communities.

The Child Support Enforcement (CSE) Program is a Federal/State/Tribal/local partnership that operates under Title IV-D of the Social Security Act. The program functions in all States and several territories and Tribes. These programs are operated primarily through State or county Social Services Departments, Attorneys General Offices, or Departments of Revenue. The program’s mission is to enhance the well-being of children by assuring that assistance in obtaining support, including financial and medical support, is available to children through locating parents, establishing paternity and support obligations, and monitoring and enforcing those obligations. In recent years the program has shifted its primary focus from enforcing child support orders to reimburse the government’s welfare programs to maximizing the amount of support passed on to families and to pursuing new opportunities to improve the program’s effectiveness in obtaining reliable support for children.

Child support services are available to families receiving assistance under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Program, the Medicaid Program, and the Title IV-E Foster Care Program. In addition, any other parent or person with custody of a child who has a parent living outside of the home in need of child support enforcement services may apply for those services at their local child support enforcement agency.

The child support program distributes over 90 percent of collections directly to children and families. In families that have never received TANF, the program forwards collections directly to the custodial family. Families receiving TANF, Medicaid, or IV-E Foster Care are required to assign their support rights to the State as a condition of receipt of assistance. States have the option to distribute all of these collections to families or to retain them to reimburse the State and Federal government for the costs of the public assistance provided. In addition, the State may also retain support collected through the federal tax offset process on behalf of families that used to receive assistance.

OCSE continues the recent trend of broadening the program’s reach to new partners, customers, and stakeholders while at the same time refocusing efforts on the Child Support Program’s core mission — collecting support for children and families.

Performance Highlight

FY 2008 brings an increase in the Child Support Program’s performance at many levels and by numerous measures, while expanding the scope of its efforts (for example, to new countries and new Tribes) and still concentrating on the program’s fundamental goals. During FY 2008, almost 1.8 million paternities were established and acknowledged; about $26.6 billion was collected and distributed in child support cases; there were collections in roughly 8.9 million IV-D cases; and approximately 79 percent of the cases have child support orders established. These are results that underscore the continuing success of the program.

II. Focusing on Results

A. The National Child Support Enforcement Strategic Plan

The current National Child Support Enforcement Strategic Plan runs from FY 2005-2009. It was the product of an effective collaboration among OCSE and the States and jurisdictions that focused on efforts to ensure families’ self-sufficiency by making child support a reliable source of income. There are several themes articulated in the Plan that sharpen the program’s focus. Families come first and the program recognizes the need to ensure that child support is not merely something to be collected, but a source of income upon which children and families can rely. Also, the Plan stresses various crucial needs of children and includes among its major goals: ensuring that all children have established parentage, support orders, and medical coverage; ensuring that all children receive financial support from parents as ordered; and ensuring that the IV-D Program will be efficient and responsive in its operations. The Plan also underscores the importance of preventing the build-up of unpaid support arrearages through early intervention rather than traditional debt threshold-based enforcement. Finally, the Plan stresses the importance of accountability and a commitment to measuring program performance through the use of new and revised performance indicators.

B. Performance-Based Incentives and Penalties

Incentive payments are a key source of funding for State programs and share several major areas of focus in common with the National Child Support Strategic Plan. These areas include: paternity establishment, order establishment, current collections, and cases paying towards arrears.

Program Highlight

The national averages for the performance measures in FY 2008 were:

  • IV-D Paternity Establishment Percentage: 94.94; and Statewide Paternity Establishment Percentage: 95.69
  • Percent of Support Orders Established: 79.07
  • Percent of Current Support Collected: 61.87
  • Percent of Cases Paying Towards Arrears: 63.32
  • Cost-Effectiveness Ratio: $4.80

Four key elements of the performance-based incentive system are:

  • Incentive payments based on measured performance;
  • Reliable and complete data (as determined by annual data reliability audits and reviews);
  • Annual legislated amounts from which States are paid; and
  • Incentives must be reinvested into State child support programs.

Performance Highlight

In FY 2008, 53 States/territories received an incentive payment for meeting the requirements of all the five performance measures. One State did not meet the cost-effectiveness performance measure and hence received an incentive payment based on four performance measures.

Since 1975, the Federal Government has paid incentives each year to State CSE programs to encourage improved child support collections through adhering to efficient establishment and enforcement techniques. The current performance-based incentive system was mandated by the Child Support Performance and Incentive Act (CSPIA) of 1998.

Penalties also may be assessed when the level of performance for any of the three penalty measures (paternity establishment, support order establishment, or current collections) fails to achieve a specified level, or if a State’s data used to compute incentive measures are found to be incomplete or unreliable, or when a State is not in compliance with certain child support requirements. When any of these conditions occur, there is an automatic corrective action year. The corrective action year is the fiscal year immediately following the year of the deficiency. If the State’s data are determined to be complete and reliable and the related performance is adequate for the corrective action year, the penalty is not imposed.

Performance Highlight

In FY 2008, only one State incurred a penalty. Six States received warning letters for failing specified levels in paternity establishment and will have one corrective action year to correct the deficiency.

If the corrective action was unsuccessful, the financial penalty is a reduction to the State’s Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant. The penalty amount is calculated as 1 to 2 percent of the adjusted State Family Assistance Grant (SFAG) for the TANF program for the first year of the deficiency. The penalty amount increases each year, up to 5 percent, for each consecutive year the State’s data are found to be incomplete or unreliable, or the State’s performance on a penalty measure fails to attain the specified level of performance.

C. Audits

Data Reliability Audits

The passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) changed the direction and emphasis of audits of State CSE programs conducted by OCSE. Legislative requirements now emphasize performance and outcomes rather than the pre-PRWORA requirements that focused on processing and taking actions on child support cases. In FY 2000, as required by the CSPIA, States began receiving financial incentives based on meeting or exceeding standards for each of five performance measures related to paternity and order establishment, child support collections, and cost-effectiveness.

Program Highlight

Fifty-three States/territories and jurisdictions passed the DRA/MDR in FY 2008. This is compared to all 54 States/territories that passed in FY 2007 and 52 States/territories that passed in FY 2006.

The five performance measures are evaluated using data that States report to the Federal Government. The OCSE Office of Audit performs Data Reliability Audits (DRAs) to evaluate the completeness, accuracy, security, and reliability of the data reported and produced by State reporting systems. The DRAs help ensure that incentives are earned and paid only on the basis of verifiable data and that the incentive payment system is fair and equitable. In addition, while not currently subject to incentives or penalties, data related to a proposed medical support establishment measure and a medical support enforcement measure were subject to FY 2008 data reliability audits.

Cost Audits

OCSE also is required by Section 452(a)(4)(C)(ii) of the Social Security Act to evaluate the adequacy of the financial management of a State’s program. Specifically, OCSE is mandated to perform reviews of expenditures claimed by States for Federal reimbursement. The primary objectives of a cost audit are to determine whether costs claimed by the State for Federal reimbursement are allowable, allocable, and reasonable to the child support program and to ensure that States bear their fair share of child support costs. Financial audits are performed after the data reliability audits (DRAs) are completed to the extent that time and resources are available before beginning the next fiscal year’s DRAs. Findings from cost audits for which a final report was issued in FY 2008 included unallowable non-IV-D costs claimed for reimbursement in the amount of $5,967,691.

III. Automation

Automation is critical to the operation and success of the CSE Program. OCSE has developed an approach to automation that provides both a national and State-specific focus. At the national level, the Federal Parent Locator Service (FPLS) plays a crucial role in helping OCSE fulfill its mission in assisting States to secure the financial support upon which millions of our nation’s children depend and contributes to an increase in the overall effectiveness and performance of the CSE Program. OCSE works closely with State and Tribal child support agencies in support of their automation efforts. Federal and State child support automated systems are interdependent and it is essential that they work in tandem. Statewide CSE systems receive valuable locate and enforcement information from the Federal databases, but the effective use of this information is dependent upon the level of automation in these statewide systems. Without this technology and the technical assistance OCSE provides to support it, the CSE Program would not be able to accomplish its mission and provide its services.

A. The Federal Parent Locator Service (FPLS)

Since its inception, the CSE Program has used information available via the FPLS to locate parents who have financial obligations and to collect and distribute money to children who depend on parental financial support for food, shelter, education, medical care and other needs. The FPLS has been refined and expanded continually to support ongoing congressional mandates and improve the service provided to benefit both State and Federal partners. This effort, known as FPLS Continuous Service Improvement (CSI), is focused on improving the quality, consistency, and efficiency of data; improving interstate communication; and providing additional resources for the establishment and enforcement of child support.

The FPLS now includes several mission-critical systems supporting OCSE business processes, allowing OCSE to improve its performance and achieve its goals:

  • The National Directory of New Hires (NDNH) contains employment and unemployment information collected from 54 States and territories and from all Federal agencies.
  • The Federal Case Registry of Child Support Orders (FCR) consists of child support case and participant information from 54 States/territories. At the end of FY 2008, the FCR contained over 19 million cases and included participant information on more than 43 million individuals.
  • The Federal Offset System (FOS) contains data certified by States regarding the amount of past-due child support owed by noncustodial parents. The FOS interfaces with the Department of Treasury’s Financial Management Service (FMS) to offset tax refunds and other Federal payments (up to the amount certified by State CSE agencies); the Department of State to deny issuance of passports to delinquent noncustodial parents;and over 4,400 multi-state financial institutions to identify noncustodial parents’ assets so that States can levy their accounts to collect past-due child support.
  • The Intergovernmental Referral Guide (IRG) provides child support case processing procedures and information from each of the 54 State and territorial jurisdictions that is used to increase the efficiency of interstate case processing.
  • The Electronic Income Withholding Order (e-IWO) was designed, developed and implemented in 2005 by OCSE as a process to enable States to send income withholding orders (IWOs) electronically to employers.
  • The Child Support Enforcement Network (CSENet) is an application that supports the electronic exchange of interstate case requests over a private, closed network, and the exchange of e-IWOs by States directly to the Department of Defense, the largest single employer in the United States.
  • The Query Interstate Cases for Kids (QUICK) application provides authorized child support personnel in one State with real-time access to financial and case information in another State for purposes of processing the case and providing customer service to parents receiving child support services.

B. State and Tribal Automation

Automation for States and Tribes in FY 2008 was characterized by the creation of a Model Tribal System for use by comprehensive Tribal IV-D grantees at the same time that the States were facing aging statewide CSE systems and/or infrastructure that was no longer being supported. A majority of State child support enforcement agencies indicated in FY 2008 that they were planning for either replacement of their legacy CSE systems or major enhancements.

IV. Tribal IV-D Program

The Tribal Child Support Program authorizes direct grants to Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations to operate child support enforcement programs. Funding for Tribal IV-D grants is authorized in 45 Code of Federal Regulation, Part 309, Tribal Child Support Enforcement IV-D Program.

The Tribal Child Support Program oversees Tribal Start-Up programs and Tribal Comprehensive IV-D programs. Tribal Start-Up programs are in developmental stages. These programs do not yet meet the requirements set forth in the regulations to become Tribal Comprehensive IV-D programs.

Tribal Comprehensive IV-D programs are fully operational child support enforcement programs. These programs provide full child support services including: establishment of paternity; establishment of support orders; modification and enforcement of support orders; collection and distribution of support; and location of non-custodial and custodial parents and their assets.

Performance Highlight

In FY 2008, 20 Tribal Start-Up programs became fully funded, operational, and comprehensive, increasing the number of Tribal Comprehensive IV-D programs to 32. Almost $20 million was collected, distributed to families, or sent to States for cases that Tribes enforced for States. This represents a 27 percent increase over the $15.7 million collected in FY 2007.

Below is a list of the start-up programs that became fully funded in FY 2008. (See Appendix D for individual Tribal highlights for FY 2008.)

  • Comanche Nation, OK
  • Kaw Nation, OK
  • Keweenaw Bay, MI
  • Kickapoo Tribe, KS
  • Klamath Tribes, OR
  • Mescalero Apache, NM
  • Modoc Tribe, OK
  • Muscogee (Creek) Nation, OK
  • Nooksack Tribe, WA
  • Northern Arapaho, WY
  • Oneida, WI
  • Penobscot Nation, ME
  • Ponca, OK
  • Pueblo of Zuni, NM
  • Quinault Nation, WA
  • Red Lake Band, MN
  • Three Affiliated Tribes, ND
  • Umatilla, OR
  • White Earth Nation, MN
  • Winnebago, NE

The following nine start-up programs sought funding during FY 2008 to become a fully operational Tribal Comprehensive IV-D program:

  • Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe
  • Eastern Shoshone Tribe, WY
  • Blackfeet Nation, MT
  • Aleutian-Pribilof Islands, AK
  • Coeur D’Alene Tribe, ID
  • Suquamish Tribe, WA
  • Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe, MN
  • Kickapoo, OK
  • Fort Belknap Indian Community, MT

V. International Child Support Program

The United States (U.S.) signed the Hague Convention on the International Recovery of Child Support and Other Forms of Family Maintenance on November 23, 2007. By the United States joining this Convention, more children living in the U.S. will receive the financial support of both their parents, wherever the parents live. U.S. courts already recognize and enforce foreign child support decisions, while many countries do not accord similar treatment to decisions issued by U.S. courts in the absence of a treaty obligation. The Convention provides for a comprehensive system of cooperation between the child support authorities of contracting states, establishes procedures for the recognition of foreign child support decisions, and requires effective measures for the prompt enforcement of such decisions.

This Convention advances important objectives by promoting the enforcement of child support obligations in cases where the custodial parent and child are in one country and the noncustodial parent is in another. Thus, ratification of the Convention is a very important next step.

VI. Program Collaborations

In FY 2008, program collaboration continues to be an essential component to successfully fulfilling OCSE’s mission of reaching a larger population with more comprehensive services. Collaborations help the program broaden its capacity to blend interrelated issues and help provide a framework for addressing the appropriateness and effectiveness of services provided. To this end, listed are the ongoing partnerships between OCSE and other organizations.

Program Highlight

In FY 2008, OCSE participated in the following collaborations and initiatives:

  1. National Judicial/Child Support Enforcement Task Force

    The National Judicial/Child Support Enforcement Task Force continued its role in support of increased child support collections through enhanced collaboration between the IV-D and court/judicial communities and drafted a new strategic plan identifying its goals and objectives through 2010.

  2. Collaboration Institute

    OCSE, the Office of Family Assistance, and the US Department of Labor (DOL) Employment and Training Administration jointly held a Collaboration Institute for 13 urban jurisdiction areas to strengthen coordination, communication, collaboration, and share promising practices in their cities and counties to develop and enhance integrated service delivery strategies.

  3. Department of Labor/Department of Justice/Child Support Enforcement Prisoner Re-Entry Initiative

    OCSE met with the DOL and Department of Justice to discuss the Prisoner Reentry Initiative (PRI) and how to link child support grants to existing PRI grants to ensure child support case management would be provided to participants.

  4. Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)/Child Support Enforcement Drug Court Initiative

    OCSE met with SAMHSA to learn more about the drug court model and presented basic information about child support at the National Association of Drug Court Professionals.

  5. Military/Child Support Enforcement Collaboration

    OCSE continued to collaborate with the Department of Defense (DoD) through training sessions for child support case workers and trainers staffed by OCSE, DoD and Defense Finance and Accounting Service instructors.

  6. Child Support and Child Welfare Collaboration

    OCSE participated in meetings conducted by the Children’s Bureau to support the Quality Improvement Center efforts to involve non resident fathers in permanency planning for children involved in the child welfare system. Discussions were held to determine which data could be shared between the two programs.

  7. Project to Avoid Increasing Delinquencies (PAID) Initiative

    OCSE continued its focus on the PAID initiative which focuses on setting appropriate orders; employing early intervention; reviewing and modifying orders; improving locate and enforcement; and managing existing arrears.

VII. Grants and Waivers: Findings and Lessons Learned

A. Section 1115 and Special Improvement Project (SIP) Grants

Section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act provides OCSE with the authority to fund demonstration grants to test and evaluate new policies and practices that are intended to improve the operation of the CSE program. The Special Improvement Project (SIP) grant program provides funding for projects that further the Child Support mission and goals and helps improve program performance.

In FY 2008, Section 1115 grants included awards for: a) projects to avoid increasing child support delinquencies, including strategies to increase collections of current support and reduce arrearages; b) business intelligence/data analysis approaches to improve performance; and c) child support outreach approaches which provide case management services and child support education to faith-based and community organizations and their clients.

In FY 2008, SIP grants included awards for: a) testing the effectiveness of using media technology to design child support enforcement materials targeting unwed teens and young adults; b) demonstrating effectiveness of collaboration efforts between child support enforcement agencies and the courts to improve operating efficiencies and outcomes for client parents; and c) assessing the effectiveness of specific strategies on child support compliance.

Program Highlight

In FY 2008, OCSE awarded eight Section 1115 projects totaling $389,046 and eight SIP grants totaling nearly $750,000.

B. Child Access and Visitation Grants

The grants to States for the Access and Visitation (AV) Program (42 U.S.C. 669b) were authorized by Congress through the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996. The statutory goal of the program is to enable States to establish and administer programs to support and facilitate noncustodial parents’ access to and visitation of their children by means of activities including mediation (both voluntary and mandatory), counseling, education, development of parenting plans, visitation enforcement (including monitoring, supervision and neutral drop-off and pick-up), and development of guidelines for visitation and alternative custody arrangements.

Since its inception, $10 million has been appropriated each year to be allocated among the States for the Access and Visitation Program, with each State required to contribute 10 percent of total program costs. The funds are allocated to each State per Section 469B (42 U.S.C. 669b) using the following funding formula, with a minimum allocation of $100,000 per State:

“The allotment of a State for a fiscal year is the amount that bears the same ratio to $10,000,000 for grants under this section for the fiscal year as the number of children in the State living with only one biological parent bears to the total number of such children in all States.”

C. Healthy Marriage Initiative Grants

Recognizing the apparent link between family structures and child well-being outcomes, ACF in FY 2003 launched the healthy marriage initiative. OCSE funded 15 waiver demonstration projects under the Community Healthy Marriage Initiative (MA, FL, GA, KY, IL, OH, MI, IN, MN, TX, LA, CO, ID, WA (Lakewood) and WA (Yakima)). The Initiative consisted of three multi-year demonstration programs that introduced healthy marriage activities into low-income populations around the nation. These activities consisted of marriage and relationship education, case management services, and referrals to other services. These demonstration projects are designed to build in-state networks of providers and community partnerships with the intention of being sustained beyond the period of Federal funding.

VIII. Consumer Services

OCSE operates an Internet Web site that provides child support professionals and the public with easy access and search capability to a significant amount of information about the child support program. OCSE responds, via e-mail and in writing, to thousands of customer, congressional, and White House case inquiries and requests for program information. OCSE operates the National Reference Center which responds to requests for child support publications. In addition, OCSE provides services to customers and child support professionals in the international community and publishes the CSE national newsletter, Child Support Report.

Appendices

A. Appendix I. Child Support Enforcement: Charts & Graphs

List of Charts

Cases

  • Figure 1: The Child Support Caseload by Total, Current, Former, and Never Assistance and Percentages for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
  • Figure 2: Percentage of Caseload by State, Fiscal Year 2008
  • Figure 3: Number and Percentage of Child Support Cases Open With and Without Support Orders Established for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
  • Figure 4: Number of Cases for Which a Collection Was Made by Current, Former, and Never Assistance for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

Paternities Acknowledged

  • Figure 5: Paternities Established or Acknowledged for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

Collections

  • Figure 6: Percentage of Collections Distributed to Current, Former, Never, and Medicaid Assistance Cases, FY 2008
  • Figure 7: Total Child Support Collections Received by Different Methods of Collections, FY 2008
  • Figure 8: Total Distributed Collections by TANF/Foster Care and Non-TANF Collections for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
  • Figure 9: Percentage of Net Undistributed Collections (UDC) by Category and Age, FY 2008

Expenditures

  • Figure 10: Total Administrative Expenditures for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
  • Figure 11: Total Automated Data Processing (ADP) Expenditures for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

Number of Children

  • Figure 12: Total Number of Children in the IV-D Program for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

Federal Parent and Locator Service (FPLS)

  • Figure 13: Number of Unique Persons Matched and Number of Persons in the Federal Case Registry (FCR) by Participant Type for Five Fiscal Years
  • Figure 14: Federal Offset Collections for Five Processing Years

Figure 1: The Child Support Caseload by Total, Current, Former, and Never Assistance and Percentages for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

In FY 2008, while the total child support caseload decreased to 15.7 million cases, never assistance cases increased to 6.6 million cases. The overall caseload decrease was due in part to a decrease in current assistance cases.

Figure data: The Child Support Caseload by Total, Current, Former, and Never Assistance and Percentages for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
FY 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Source: Form OCSE-157 lines 1 and 3
Total (Millions) 15.9 15.9 15.8 15.8 15.7
Current Assistance (Millions) 2.6 2.5 2.3 2.1 2.0
Former Assistance (Millions) 7.3 7.3 7.3 7.2 7.1
Never Assistance (Millions) 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.4 6.6
Current Assist % 17% 16% 15% 14% 13%
Former Assist. % 46% 46% 46% 46% 45%
Never Assist. % 37% 38% 39% 41% 42%

In FY 2008, while the total child support caseload decreased to 15.7 million cases, never assistance cases increased to 6.6 million cases. The overall caseload decrease was due in part to a decrease in current assistance cases.


Figure 2: Percentage of Caseload by State, Fiscal Year 2008

Eight States comprise more than 46.7 percent of the total child support caseload.

Figure data: Percentage of Caseload by State, Fiscal Year 2008
States Percentage of Caseload
Source: Form OCSE-157, lines 1 and 3
ALABAMA 1.4
ALASKA 0.3
ARIZONA 1.4
ARKANSAS 0.8
CALIFORNIA 10.4
COLORADO 0.9
CONNECTICUT 1.2
DELAWARE 0.4
DIST. OF COL. 0.4
FLORIDA 5.1
GEORGIA 2.5
GUAM 0.1
HAWAII 0.6
IDAHO 0.8
ILLINOIS 3.2
INDIANA 2.2
IOWA 1.2
KANSAS 0.8
KENTUCKY 2.1
LOUISIANA 1.8
MAINE 0.4
MARYLAND 1.6
MASSACHUSETTS 1.7
MICHIGAN 6.0
MINNESOTA 1.6
MISSISSIPPI 2.0
MISSOURI 2.3
MONTANA 0.2
NEBRASKA 0.7
NEVADA 0.7
NEW HAMPSHIRE 0.2
NEW JERSEY 2.2
NEW MEXICO 0.4
NEW YORK 5.7
NORTH CAROLINA 2.7
NORTH DAKOTA 0.3
OHIO 6.2
OKLAHOMA 1.2
OREGON 1.4
PENNSYLVANIA 3.1
PUERTO RICO 1.5
RHODE ISLAND 0.4
SOUTH CAROLINA 1.4
SOUTH DAKOTA 0.3
TENNESSEE 2.7
TEXAS 7.0
UTAH 0.5
VERMONT 0.1
VIRGIN ISLANDS 0.1
VIRGINIA 2.2
WASHINGTON 2.2
WEST VIRGINIA 0.8
WISCONSIN 2.3
WYOMING 0.2

Eight States comprise more than 46.7 percent of the total child support caseload.


Figure 3: Number and Percentage of Child Support Cases Open With and Without Support Orders Established for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

Although the total child support caseload decreased in FY 2008, cases with orders increased by 1 percentage point over FY 2007.

Figure data: Number and Percentage of Child Support Cases Open With and Without Support Orders Established for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
FY 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Source: Form OCSE-157 lines 1 and 2
Total Cases Open (Millions) 15.8 15.8 15.8 15.7 15.6
With Orders (Millions) 11.8 12.0 12.2 12.3 12.4
Without Orders (Millions) 4.1 3.9 3.6 3.4 3.2
With Orders % 74% 75% 77% 78% 79%
Without Orders % 26% 25% 23% 22% 21%

Although the total child support caseload decreased in FY 2008, cases with orders increased by 1 percentage point over FY 2007.

* Data does not reflect the number of cases over which States have no jurisdiction as reported on line 3 of the OCSE-157 report.


Figure 4: Number of Cases for Which a Collection Was Made by Current, Former, and Never Assistance for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

At 8.9 million, the number of IV-D cases for which a collection was made increased by 2.3 percent in FY 2008 over FY 2007.

Figure data: Number of Cases for Which a Collection Was Made by Current, Former, and Never Assistance for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
FY 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Source: Form OCSE-157 line 18
Total (Millions) 8.2 8.3 8.5 8.7 8.9
Current Assistance (Millions) 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7
Former Assistance (Millions) 3.9 3.9 4.0 4.0 4.1
Never Assistance (Millions) 3.5 3.6 3.8 4.0 4.2

At 8.9 million, the number of IV-D cases for which a collection was made increased by 2.3 percent in FY 2008 over FY 2007.


Figure 5: Paternities Established or Acknowledged for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

In FY 2008, almost 1.8 million paternities were established and acknowledged — largely through in-hospital and other acknowledgement programs.

Figure data: Paternities Established or Acknowledged for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
FY 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Source: Form OCSE-157 lines 10 and 16
Paternity Established (Thousands) 692 690 675 640 629
Paternity Acknowledged1 (Thousands) 915 950 1,026 1,089 1,154
Total (Thousands) 1,607 1,640 1,701 1.729 1,783

In FY 2008, almost 1.8 million paternities were established and acknowledged — largely through in-hospital and other acknowledgement programs.

1Includes in-hospital and other paternities acknowledged. Paternity acknowledgements include an unknown number of acknowledgements for children in the IV-D caseload.


Figure 6. Percentage of Collections Distributed to Current, Former, Never and Medicaid Assistance Cases, FY 2008

The largest percentage of child support collections were made for families who were never on assistance. Former assistance and never assistance families combined received 82 percent of the total child support collections in FY 2008

Figure data: Percentage of Collections Distributed to Current, Former, Never and Medicaid Assistance Cases, FY 2008 ($26.6 Billion Distributed)
Current Assistance Former Assistance Never Assistance Medicaid
Source: Form OCSE-34A line 8
$978 Million (4%) $9.9 Billion (37%) $12.0 Billion (45%) $3.6 Billion (14%)

The largest percentage of child support collections were made for families who were never on assistance. Former assistance and never assistance families combined received 82 percent of the total child support collections in FY 2008


Figure 7: Total Child Support Collections Received by Different Methods of Collections, FY 2008

Wage withholding continues to be the most common method of collecting child support.

Figure data: Total Child Support Collections Received by Different Methods of Collections, FY 2008 ($32.2 Billion Collected)
Income Withholding2 Unemployment Intercept Offset Federal Tax Offset State Tax Offset Other (AEI) Source3 Other States Other Countries
Source: Form OCSE-34A lines 2a thru 2h
68% ($21.9 Billion) 2% ($634 Million) 8.2% ($2.6 Billion) 0.8% ($253 Million) 16.4% ($5.3 Billion) 4.3% ($1.4 Billion) 0.4% ($140 Million)

Wage withholding continues to be the most common method of collecting child support.

2 Wage withholding includes some collections from non-IV-D families.
3 Includes administrative enforcement in interstate (AEI) cases and other sources


Figure 8: Total Distributed Collections by TANF/Foster Care and Non-TANF Collections for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

Non-TANF collections continued to increase from FY 2004 to FY 2008.

Figure data: Total Distributed Collections by TANF/Foster Care and Non-TANF Collections for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
FY 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Source: Form OCSE-34A, Total: line 8G; TANF/FC: line 8, columns (A+B) and line 7a, columns (C+D) Beginning in FY 2008, TANF/FC: line 8, columns (A+B) and line 7b, columns (C+D)
TANF/FC (Billions) $2.2 $2.2 $2.1 $2.1 $2.3
Non-TANF (Billions) $19.6 $20.7 $21.8 $22.8 $24.3
Total (Billions) $21.8 $22.9 $23.9 $24.9 $26.6

Non-TANF collections continued to increase from FY 2004 to FY 2008.


Figure 9: Percentage of Net Undistributed Collections (UDC) by Category and Age, FY 20084

Tax offset held up to 6 months for injured spouse claims was the largest component of the undistributed collections by category in FY 2008.

Figure data: Percentage of Net Undistributed Collections (UDC) by Category, FY 20084
Tax Offset held up to 6 months Held for future support Legal Dispute & to other States Unidentified Location of CP or NCP Uncashed & stale-dated Inaccurate & missing information Other Recieved within past 2 business days
Source: Form OCSE-34A, Part 2, lines 3-7 and 9-13
39% 17% 10% 1% 6% 3% 8% 9% 7%

Tax offset held up to 6 months for injured spouse claims was the largest component of the undistributed collections by category in FY 2008.

Figure data: Percentage of Net Undistributed Collections (UDC) by Age, FY 2008
≤ 2 days > 2 days ≤ 30 days > 30 days ≤ 6 months > 6 months ≤ 1 year > 1 year ≤ 3 years > 3 years ≤ 5 years > 5 years
Source: Form OCSE-34A, Part 2, lines 14-20
12% 23% 49% 4% 6% 2% 4%

4 Net UDC is the amount of collections that remained undistributed at the end of the previous quarter.

Tax offset held up to 6 months for injured spouse claims was the largest component of the undistributed collections by category in FY 2008.


Figure 10: Total Administrative Expenditures for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

Total administrative expenditures increased from $5.3 in FY 2004 to $5.9 in FY 2008, an eleven percent increase.

Figure data: Total Administrative Expenditures for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
FY 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Source: Form OCSE-396A line 9, column A, B, C, D
Beginning in FY 2008, Form OCSE-396A line 7, column A, B, C, D
Total (Billions) $5.3 $5.3 $5.6 $5.6 $5.9
Federal Share (Billions) $3.5 $3.5 $3.7 $3.7 $3.7
State Share (Billions) $1.8 $1.8 $1.9 $1.9 $2.2

Total administrative expenditures increased from $5.3 in FY 2004 to $5.9 in FY 2008, an eleven percent increase.


Figure 11: Total Automated Data Processing (ADP) Expenditures for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

Automated Data Processing (ADP) expenditures increased 7.3 percent in FY 2008 over FY 2007.

Figure data: Total Automated Data Processing (ADP) Expenditures for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
FY 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Source: Form OCSE-396A, lines 4, 5, and 6, column A+C
Total (Millions) $880 $835 $876 $862 $925

Automated Data Processing (ADP) expenditures increased 7.3 percent in FY 2008 over FY 2007.


Figure 12: Total Number of Children in the IV-D Program for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

The number of children in the child support program decreased in FY 2008 from FY 2007.

Figure data: Total Number of Children in the IV-D Program for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
FY 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Source: Form OCSE-157, line 4
Total (Thousands) 17,289,695 17,173,286 17,261,575 17,121,013 17,031,940

The number of children in the child support program decreased in FY 2008 from FY 2007.


Figure 13: Number of Unique Persons Matched and Number of Persons in the Federal Case Registry (FCR) by Participant Type for Five Fiscal Years

The number of unique persons matched decreased by 0.4 percent between FY 2007 and 2008. Children make up the largest portion of the participant types.

Figure data: Number of Unique Persons (NCPs and PFs) Matched6 by the FPLS FYs 2004-2008
FY 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Source: Form OCSE-157, line 4
Number of Unique Persons Matched (Millions) 4.2 4.7 5.0 4.9 4.9

The number of unique persons matched decreased by 0.4 percent between FY 2007 and 2008. Children make up the largest portion of the participant types.

Figure data: Number of Persons in the FCR by Participant Type5 as of 09/30/08
Type of Participant Non-custodial parents Putative fathers Custodial parents Children
Number of People (Millions) 11.8 1.2 12.9 20.1

The number of unique persons matched decreased by 0.4 percent between FY 2007 and 2008. Children make up the largest portion of the participant types.

5 The Number of Unique Persons (NCPs and PFs) Matched is derived by unduplicating SSNs located across all data types (W-4, QW, and UI). The figures for the individual participant types are unduplicated within that category but not between them--i.e., an individual may appear in more than one category, but is only counted once within that category
6 The figures for the individual participant types are unduplicated within that category but not between them--i.e., an individual may appear in more than one category, but is only counted once within that category.


Figure 14: Federal Offset Collections for Five Processing Years

Federal Offset collections for 2008 were $2.85 billion, a 68.6 percent increase over the previous year.

Figure data: Federal Offset Collections for Five Processing Years
Processing Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Total Net Collections (Billions) $1.49 $1.58 $1.60 $1.69 $2.857

Federal Offset collections for 2008 were $2.85 billion, a 68.6 percent increase over the previous year.

7The Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 allowed States to certify nearly 1 million additional non-TANF debts in PY 2008 that were previously not eligible for tax refund offset. It is estimated that this resulted in at least an additional $200 million collected. The Economic Stimulus Act of 2008 provided economic stimulus payments of up to $600 ($1,200 if filing a joint return, plus additional amounts for each qualifying child), to be made to over 130 million American households. These payments were eligible for tax refund offset and resulted in an additional $863 million in collections in PY 2008.

B. Appendix II. Child Support Enforcement: Box Scores
OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT
FY 2008 NATIONWIDE BOX SCORES

C. Appendix III. Child Support Enforcement: Summary Tables

List of Tables

Program Overview

Program Collections

Federal and State Share of Collections

Undistributed Collections

Other Collections

Payments to Families

Interstate Activity

Cost-Effectiveness

Incentives

Medical Support

Program Expenditures

Functional Costs

Fees

Cases and Caseloads

Orders Established

Paternities

Services Provided

Services Required

Staff

Current Support

Arrears

Non-Cooperation and Good Cause

Children

Federal Parent Locator Service

Tribal Program

D. Appendix IV. Tribal Highlights

The following highlights some accomplishments of the Tribal Comprehensive IV-D programs set forth in their narrative reports for FY 2008.

Tribal Program Accomplishments
Cherokee Nation
  • Managed a caseload of 3,182 cases; 1,303 were cases with support orders; and case initiation workers alone handled over 1,700 cases.
  • Established paternities for 1,935 children.
  • Collected over $2.7 million in child support.
  • Attended 40 hours of training on Child Support Enforcement (CSE) and/or cultural considerations of the Cherokee people.
Chickasaw Nation
  • Administered more than 96 genetic paternity tests.
  • Established and/or acknowledged paternity on 2,200 cases; established 2,386 child support orders.
  • Distributed $176,982 from the “undistributed list.”
  • Collected over $4.8 million in child support.
  • Collected more than $3.5 million from clients through the Tribal Employment Payment Project (TEPP), which was initiated in August 2004 and received favorable responses. The workers managed an average of 55 TEPP cases per month.
Forest County Potawatomi
  • Child support cases increased by 32 percent.
  • Paternity applications increased 110 percent over the previous fiscal year.
  • Collected nearly $2.8 million in child support, an increase of 14.3 percent from FY 2007. Of those collections, over $894,000 was sent to other States and Tribes.
  • Achieved a cost-effectiveness ratio of $6.76 with expenditures of $411,201.
Kaw Nation
  • Became a Tribal comprehensive IV-D program in June 2008.
  • Managed 12 cases, none of which were State TANF or Tribal TANF cases.
  • Paternity was established on 86 percent of the children in the caseload, which exceeded the target goal of 50 percent.
  • Established a support order obligation for 66 percent of the cases, which exceeded the target goal of 60 percent.
  • Collected 91 percent of the current support due, which exceeded the target goal of 50 percent.
  • Collected 24 percent of the past-due support, the goal was 30 percent.
Keweenaw Bay
  • Became a comprehensive Tribal IV-D program on July 1, 2008.
  • Identified approximately 180 cases for potential transfer or referral from the State of Michigan to the Tribes.
  • Had one paternity case; a petition was filed to establish paternity.
Lac du Flambeau
  • Maintained a caseload of 900 cases; 63 were TANF and 837 were former TANF cases.
  • Provided child support services for 589 Tribal children.
  • Collected $652,666 for current support, which resulted in a collections rate of 90 percent.
  • Collected $208,857 in arrears resulting in 55 percent of collections per case.
Lummi Nation
  • Had a caseload of 591 open cases, with 50 opened in the 2007-2008 fiscal year.
  • 259 cases had a support order.
  • Established paternities for 21 new children.
  • Collected and distributed $360,580 in current support.
  • Collected and distributed $52,109 in past-due support.
Menominee
  • Had a caseload of 1,818 cases; 1,608 (88 percent) had orders for support.
  • Collected over $1.4 million in child support.
  • Distributed $1,268,651 (90 percent of collections) to families and children, an increase of 20 percent over FY 2007. Distributed the balance to non IV-D cases and to other States.
  • Established paternity for 80 children either by Judgment of the Tribal Court (51), through Stipulation Agreement between the parents (14), or by voluntary acknowledgement of the father (15).
  • Paternity establishment rate was 105 percent.
Muscogee (Creek) Nation
  • Became a comprehensive Tribal IV-D program on July 1, 2008.
  • Of the total caseload of 301, there were 45 Tribal TANF cases, 10 State TANF cases, and 246 Non-TANF cases.
  • Collected and distributed $49,683 in current support.
Navajo Nation
  • Caseload decreased from 16,628 in FY 2007 to 15,968 in FY 2008 due to case closures.
  • 4,225 cases had an order for support compared with 4,110 cases in FY 2007.
  • Established 10,105 paternities.
  • Collected more than $7.7 million in child support, an increase of 7 percent over the $7.2 million collected in FY 2007.
Oneida Nation
  • Became a Tribal comprehensive IV-D program on April 1, 2008.
  • Had a caseload of 482; enforced 237 cases through income withholding.
  • Paternity establishment rate was 98 percent; exceeding the Tribe’s goal of 90 percent.
  • Total expenditures were $167,750.
Osage Nation
  • Successfully established 103 orders through case transfer, referral, or new applications.
  • Established 82 judgments, in an effort to collect amounts owed for past-due arrearages.
  • Registered several State orders that allowed wage assignments to disperse an additional $71,713 that otherwise might have gone uncollected.
  • Contributed to the economic growth by stimulating the local economy with an additional $109,549 that was collected from outside of the reservation in a time of economic hardship.
Penobscot Nation
  • Became a Tribal comprehensive IV-D program on July 1, 2008.
  • From July through September 2008, primary focus was on hiring and training new staff and relocating to a new office.
Ponca
  • Became a Tribal comprehensive IV-D program on July 1, 2008.
  • Conducted community outreach to publicize child support services.
Port Gamble S’Klallam
  • Had a caseload of 368 cases, an increase of 13 percent over FY 2007.
  • Collections were $108,297, an increase of 21 percent over FY 2007.
  • Collected $37,473 in inter-jurisdictional case collections for the State.
  • Collaborated with Tribal TANF, Tribal Foster Care, Indian Child Welfare, Tribal Court, and other partners to improve communications, case referrals, and dissemination of information.
Puyallup
  • Had a caseload of 559 cases, 486 of which were cases with support orders.
  • Established paternity for 295 children.
  • Continued to have an extensive customer service practice when dealing with child support cases.
  • Closed cases within six months because of back child support being paid off and cases being paid in full.
Red Lake Nation
  • Became a comprehensive Tribal IV-D program in mid-June 2008.
  • Had a caseload of 23 cases; 11 were State TANF and 12 were Non-State TANF.
  • Responded to over 68 inquiries from potential clients via telephone, mail, or walk-in contacts regarding services offered through the Child Support Enforcement Program.
  • Program costs were $180,559.
Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate
  • Had a caseload of 1,284; 184 were Tribal TANF, 7 were State TANF, and 1,093 were Non-TANF cases.
  • 892 cases had support orders.
  • Established paternities for 24 children.
  • Collected and distributed $552,728 as current support and collected and distributed $52,273 as arrears.
  • Total program costs were $772,052.
  • Made on-site visits to provide information and technical assistance to the Three Affiliated Tribes of North Dakota, The Red Lake Tribe and White Earth Tribes of Minnesota, and the Eastern Shoshone Tribe of Wyoming.
Tlingit and Haida
  • Paternity establishment rate increased to 97 percent, which exceeded the target rate of 90 percent.
  • Support order establishment rate increased to 88 percent, which exceeded the target rate of 80 percent.
  • Had a caseload of 343 of which 305 were cases with support orders.
  • Established paternity for 666 children.
  • Collected $27,696 in child support.
Three Affiliated Tribes
  • Became a comprehensive Tribal IV-D program on April 1, 2008.
  • Caseload increased from 62 cases to 175 cases.
  • Completed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) related to the provision of child support services in inter-jurisdictional cases.
  • Child support services were limited and no court dates were scheduled in FY 2008 due to limited resources and a delay in securing a judge until August 2008.
Umatilla Indian Reservation
  • Became a comprehensive Tribal IV-D program on April 1, 2008.
  • Developed required internal forms necessary to process cases.
  • Educated staff to accomplish the mission of the Child Support Enforcement Program.
  • Worked cooperatively with the State of Oregon to achieve an interaction most effective for establishing and collecting child support quickly.
  • Began working with noncustodial parents to institute support orders, assignment of tribal dividends, and to establish paternity.
  • Received three completed applications and opened four cases in September 2008.
  • Developed a tri-fold brochure to publicize child support services.

E. Appendix V. Glossary
Financial and Statistical Terms

Program Collections

Table 4 - Total Distributed Collections (Form OCSE-34A — Part 1, line 8, column G)

Total amount of collections distributed during the year on behalf of both TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) and non-TANF families. Total collections are calculated as the sums of Current IV-A and IV-E Assistance, Former IV-A and IV-E Assistance, Medicaid Never Assistance, and Other Never Assistance.

Table 8 - Distributed Medicaid Never Assistance Collections (Form OCSE-34A — Part 1, line 8, column E)

The amount of collections received and distributed on behalf of children who are receiving Child Support Enforcement services under Title IV-D of the Social Security Act (SSA), and who are either currently receiving or who have formerly received Medicaid payments under Title XIX of the SSA, but who are not currently receiving and who have never formerly received assistance under either Title IV-A (TANF or AFDC) or Title IV-E (Foster Care) of the SSA.

Table 10 - Distributed TANF/Foster Care Collections (Form OCSE-34A, line 8, columns (A+B) + line 7a, columns (C+D); beginning in FY 2008, OCSE-34A — Part 1, line 8, columns (A+B) + line 7b, columns (C+D))

The portion of total collections received on behalf of families receiving assistance under the TANF program plus children placed in foster care facilities. These collections are divided between the State and Federal governments to reimburse their respective shares of either Title IV-A assistance payments or Title IV-E Foster Care maintenance payments.

Table 13 - Distributed Non-TANF Collections (Form OCSE-34A, line 7b, columns (C+D) + line 7c, columns (C+D) + 8, columns (E+F); beginning in FY 2008, OCSE-34A — Part 1, line 7c, columns (C+D) + line 7d, columns (C+D) + line 8, columns (E+F))

The portion of total collections received on behalf of families not receiving assistance under the TANF/Foster Care programs and distributed to those families during the year.

Federal and State Share of Collections

Table 14 - Federal Share of TANF/Foster Care Collections (Form OCSE-34A, line 10a, column G + line 10b, column G)

The portion of child support collections used to reimburse the Federal government for its share of past assistance payments under Title IV-E and IV-A of the Social Security Act.

Table 15 - State Share of TANF/Foster Care Collections (Form OCSE-34A, line 7a, column B — (Lines 10a, column G + 10b, column G); beginning in FY 2008, OCSE-34A — Part 1, line 7b, column G - (lines 10a, column G + 10b, column G))

The portion of child support collections used to reimburse the State government for its share of past assistance payments under Title IV-E and IV-A of the Social Security Act.

Undistributed Collections

Table 17 - Net Undistributed Collections (Form OCSE-34A — Part 1, line 9b, column G - 4th quarter)

The amount of collections that remains available for distribution in a future quarter.

Other Collections

Table 25 - Collections Forwarded to Non-IV-D Cases (Form OCSE-34A, line 4, column G; beginning in FY 2008, OCSE-34A — Part 1, line 4a, column G)

Those collections received through income withholding and processed through the State Disbursement Unit on behalf of Non-IV-D cases that were forwarded to the custodial parent during the quarter.

Payments to Families

Table 29 - Total Payments to Families (Form OCSE-34A, line 7c, column G; beginning in FY 2008, OCSE-34A — Part 1, line 7d, column G)

The total collections that are distributed either to the family or to the foster care agency to be used on the child’s behalf.

Table 30 - Current TANF/Foster Care Assistance Payments to Families (Form OCSE-34A, line 7c, columns (A+B); beginning in FY 2008, OCSE-34A — Part 1, line 7d, columns (A+B))

The total amount of collections that are distributed either to the family or to the foster care agency to be used on the child’s behalf.

Table 69 - Amount of Current Support Due (Form OCSE-157, line 24)

The total amount of current support by current, former and never assistance for the fiscal year for all IV-D cases includes total voluntary collections.

Table 70 - Amount of Support Distributed as Current Support (Form OCSE-157, line 25)

The total amount of support distributed as current support during the fiscal year for all IV-D cases. Voluntary payments are considered current support and should be included even though there is no order to require payment.

Arrears

Table 71 - Total Amount of Arrearages Due (Form OCSE-157, line 26)

The total amount of arrears due and unpaid as of the end of the fiscal year for all fiscal years, including the fiscal year covered by the report. Interest and penalties on arrearages may be included.

Table 72 - Total Amount of Support Distributed as Arrears (Form OCSE-157, line 27)

The total amount of support distributed this fiscal year as arrearages. This amount includes judgments ordered and paid this fiscal year for prior year support.

Tables 73 and 74 - Cases with Arrears Due and Cases Paying Towards Arrears (Form OCSE-157, lines 28 and 29)

The number of cases with arrears due during the fiscal year, including cases closed during the fiscal year with arrearages.

The number of cases in which there was at least one payment toward arrears during the fiscal year and the total number of IV–D cases in which payments of past–due child support were received during the fiscal year. Part or all of the payments were distributed to the family to which the past–due child support was owed.

Non-Cooperation and Good Cause

Table 76 - Cases Open with a Determination of Non-Cooperation (Form OCSE-157, line 38; beginning in FY 2006, line 37)

The number of IV–D TANF cases open at the end of the fiscal year in which a determination was made that the custodial parent refused to cooperate with state agencies in identifying and locating the non-custodial parent.

Table 77 - Cases Open with Good Cause Determinations (Form OCSE-157, line 39; beginning in FY 2006, line 38)

The number of cases open during the fiscal year in which it was determined by the State that the custodial parent has a good cause for refusing to cooperate with state agencies in identifying and locating the non-custodial parent.

Children

Table 78 - Children with Paternity Resolved (Form OCSE-157, line 7)

The number of children in the IV–D caseload open at the end of the fiscal year with paternity resolved. Include all children born within a marriage, legitimized by marriage or adoption and children with paternity established or acknowledged.

Table 79 - Total Number of Children in IV-D Cases (Form OCSE 157, line 4)

The number of children in the IV–D caseload in cases open at the end of the fiscal year. This includes those children who are under age 18.

Tribal Program

Tables 92 and 93 - Tribal CSE Program Total Distributed Collections and Total Collections Forwarded to States (Form OCSE-34A, lines 8 and 5)

Collections distributed by the Tribe during the quarter, itemized by case designation. Amounts received in response to a request for assistance from another Tribe and forwarded during the quarter to that Tribe for distribution.

Table 94 - Tribal CSE Program Total Expenditures (Outlays) (Standard Form 269A, lines 10a)

The number of total outlays.

Table 95 - Tribal CSE Program Caseload (OCSE-75, line 1)

The total number of IV-D cases open on the last day of the fiscal year. Include cases open at end of the fiscal year as a result of requests for assistance received from other Tribes or States, as well as cases open in the reporting Tribe referred to another Tribe or State.

Table 96 - Tribal CSE Program Support Orders Established (OCSE-75, line 2)

The total number of IV-D cases that have support orders established. Include cases with orders entered prior to the case becoming a IV–D case, as well as cases with orders established by the IV–D agency. Include judgments for arrears, regardless of whether there is a payment schedule or an order for ongoing support.

Table 97 - Tribal CSE Program Total Number of Children Without Paternities Established (OCSE-75, line 3)

Report the number of children in cases open at the end of the previous Federal Fiscal Year who needed paternity established.

Table 98 - Tribal CSE Program Children With Paternity Established or Acknowledged (OCSE-75, line 4)

Report the number of children in cases open during or at the end of the fiscal year for whom paternity was established or acknowledged. This includes acknowledgments after genetic testing, but before adjudication, if applicable.

Include children with paternity acknowledged through a voluntary in–hospital acknowledgment program and other acknowledgment processes.