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FY2012 Preliminary Report

Office of Child Support Enforcement

Published: August 15, 2013
Information About:
State/Local Child Support Agencies, Tribal Child Support Agencies
Topics:
Federal Reporting, OCSE-157 Annual Data Report, OCSE-34A Quarterly Report of Collections, OCSE-396A Financial Report, OCSE-75 Tribal Annual Data Report
Types:
Research & Data, Annual Reports to Congress

Table of Contents

FY 2012 Child Support Program Highlights

The Office of Child Support Preliminary Report highlights financial and statistical program achievements based on quarterly and annual data.  In fiscal year (FY) 2012, information was compiled from reports on program status sent to the federal government by states and tribes.   

The Child Support Program is a federal/state/tribal/local partnership that operates under Title IV-D of the Social Security Act.  This report provides information primarily on the persons in the IV-D child support program, i.e. persons receiving establishment and enforcement services under the tribal or state IV-D program.  However, there are a few tables included that provide statistics for persons in non IV-D cases.  IV-D child support agencies are required to operate state disbursement units, and collect child support payments for all families, when the payments are collected through an income withholding order.  Thus non-IV-D cases are those for which only these limited collection and disbursement services are provided.

The attached tables (Section A), state box scores (Section B), and charts (Section C) provide details on collections, expenditures, caseload, paternities, orders established, and other program statistics for the states and tribes.

Note:  The Child Support Performance and Incentive Act of 1998 (CSPIA) required the states to have complete and reliable data for purposes of computing incentives.  Federal auditors begin their review of state data after the mandatory December 31st deadline for data submission.  Readers should note that no determination or assumption has been made in this report regarding data reliability for each state for fiscal year 2012.  The numbers are presented as submitted to OCSE.


TOTAL IV-D CASELOAD CONTINUES TO DECREASE IN 2012
 

Chart 1: Total Caseload by Current, Former, and Never Assistance and Percentages, Fiscal Years 2008-2012

Small Decrease In Total IV-D Caseload After Two Years Of Increasing Caseloads

Chart 1 Data: Total Caseload by Current, Former, and Never Assistance and Percentages, Fiscal Years 2008-2012
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Total (Millions) 15.7 15.8 15.9 15.8 15.7
Current Assistance (Millions) 2.0 2.2 2.2 2.0 1.9
Former Assistance (Millions) 7.1 6.9 6.8 6.8 6.8
Never Assistance (Millions) 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0
Current Assist. % 13% 14% 14% 13% 12%
Former Assist. % 45% 43% 43% 43% 43%
Never Assist. % 42% 43% 43% 44% 44%


Caseload: There were 15.7 million total cases in the IV-D program at the end of FY 2012. This was a small decrease (0.5 percent) from FY 2011 (Figure 1). This drop was driven primarily by an 8 percent decrease in the current assistance caseload. There were increases, however, in the former assistance (0.5 percent) and never assistance (0.5 percent) caseloads. Despite small decreases in FY 2011 and FY 2012, the total IV-D caseload is still higher than the pre-recession low in FY 2008. This is primarily due to a 7 percent increase in the never assistance caseload since FY 2008. Since FY 2008, the current assistance caseload is down by 8 percent and the former assistance caseload is down by 4 percent.


TOTAL CHILD SUPPORT COLLECTIONS ARE UP 1.5 PERCENT
 

Chart 2: Total Distributed Child Support Collections (IV-D and Non IV-D), FY 2001-2012

Small Decrease In Total IV-D Caseload After Two Years Of Increasing Caseloads

Chart 2 Data: Total Distributed Child Support Collections (IV-D and Non IV-D), FY 2001-2012
  2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Totals (Billions) $21.0 $22.4 $23.7 $26.2 $26.5 $27.5 $28.6 $30.4 $30.3 $30.4 $31.2 $31.6
IV-D Collections (Billions) $19.0 $20.1 $21.2 $21.9 $23.0 $23.9 $24.9 $26.6 $26.4 $26.6 $27.3 $27.7
Non IV-D Collections (Billions) $2.1 $2.3 $2.6 $4.3 $3.5 $3.6 $3.8 $3.8 $3.9 $3.8 $3.9 $3.9


Collections: The Child Support Program collections continued to increase for the third year in a row. Total collections increased by 1.4 percent to $31.6 billion in FY 2012 compared to $31.2 billion in FY 2011, as indicated in Chart 2. This was driven primarily by the 1.5 percent increase in IV-D distributed collections that increased to $27.7 billion in FY 2012. Non-IV-D collections remained unchanged at $3.9 billion. The amount of IV-D collections distributed to families increased by 2 percent, but assistance reimbursement decreased by 5 percent.


INCREASE IN COLLECTIONS FROM INCOME WITHHOLDING DRIVES INCREASE IN TOTAL COLLECTIONS
 

Chart 3: Total Child Support Collections Received by Method of Collection, FY 2012

Increase In Collections From Income Withholding Drives Increase In Total Collections

Chart 3 Data: Total Child Support Collections Received by Method of Collection, FY 2012
Source Amount Percentage
Notes: This chart was changed in FY 2011 to exclude collections received from other states. This chart is not comparable to prior years.
1Other sources include but are not limited to collections received from other countries; administrative enforcement in interstate (AEI) cases; payments received directly from non-custodial parents; collections received through the IRS' full collection process; collections received as a result of the administrative offset process; and collections received through the Financial Institution Data Match.
Income Witholding $22.9 billion 72%
Unemployment Compensation Offset $1.2 billion 4%
Federal Tax Offset $2.2 billion 7%
State Tax Offset $216 million 1%
Other Source1 $5.3 billion 17%


The overall increase in collections was due primarily to a 3 percent increase in collections from income withholding, particularly payroll-based withholding. As shown in Chart 3, these collections now account for approximately 72 percent of total collections. In FY 2012, collections from the offset of unemployment compensation payments continued to drop. During the recent recession, there was dramatic growth in these collections. The collections increased by more than 4 times over the period between FY 2007 and FY 2010. In FY 2011, these collections decreased by 24 percent, and in FY 2012 they decreased another 24 percent over FY 2011. Even with these significant decreases over the last two years, these collections are still more than twice the amount collected in FY 2007.

While the overall performance picture improved slightly in FY 2012, the data continue to show signs of weakness, particularly among the lowest-income families in the caseload. Although the percentage of “enforcement-ready” cases with support orders that had collections has increased slightly in FY 2012 from 70.4 percent to 71.6 percent, this is still below the FY 2008 pre-recession percentage of 72.2. The sharpest declines are in current and former assistance cases. The percentage of current assistance cases with orders that had collections declined from 59.5 percent in FY 2008 to 57.3 percent in FY 2012 and the percentage of former assistance cases with orders that had collections declined from 68.0 percent to 66.0 percent in FY 2012. The percentage of never assistance cases with orders that had collections has increased slightly from 80.0 percent in FY 2008 to 80.2 percent in FY 2012.


TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENDITURES LEVEL OFF AFTER THREE YEAR DECLINE
 

Chart 4: Total Administrative Expenditures, Fiscal Years 2008-2012

Total Administrative Expenditures Continue To Drop For Third Year In A Row

Chart 4 Data: Total Administrative Expenditures, Fiscal Years 2008-2012
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Total (Billions) $5.9 $5.9 $5.8 $5.7 $5.7
Federal Share (Billions) $3.7 $3.9 $3.8 $3.5 $3.4
State Share (Billions) $2.2 $2.0 $2.0 $2.2 $2.3


Expenditures: Chart 4 shows total administrative expenditures for fiscal years 2008-2012. In FY 2012, total administrative expenditures were $5.7 billion, which were essentially unchanged from FY 2011. Program expenditures had steadily declined for the last three years but had a slight increase of .01 percent in FY 2012. During FY 2012, we continued to see a shift in funding from the federal government to states. Also, in FY 2012, federal expenditures decreased by 2 percent, while state expenditures increased by 3 percent. In FY 2011, the federal share of expenditures decreased by 9 percent, as the funding reduction provision included in the Deficit Reduction Act of 2006 went into effect.

The number of full-time-equivalent staff continues to decrease. The number of staff is down 2 percent in FY 2012 over FY 2011 and down 9 percent since FY 2008. We have seen steady decreases in staffing levels since FY 2008.


TRIBAL CHILD SUPPORT COLLECTIONS CONTINUE TO INCREASE IN FY 2012
 

Chart 5: Total Tribal Child Support Collections

Tribal Child Support Collections Continue to Increase FY 2011

Chart 5 Data: Total Tribal Child Support Collections
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Total (Millions) $23 $26 $34 $40 $42


Tribal Child Support: In FY 2012, there were 45 comprehensive tribal child support programs. The combined programs collected $42 million in child support, which was a 4 percent increase from FY 2011. This total includes tribal distributed collections that increased to over 34 million along with over 7 million in collections that tribes sent to other tribes or states. There were four new comprehensive tribes added in FY 2012.

The attached tables and charts provide further preliminary detail regarding collections, expenditures, caseload, paternities, orders established, and other program statistics related to both State and Tribal Child Support Programs for FY 2012 and for some prior years.


Summary Tables


Nationwide and State Box Scores, FY 2012

Nationwide Boxscores
  AMOUNT % change 
from FY 11
Collections Distributed $27,719,045,787 1.5%
Current Assistance Cases $960,541,144 -4.9%
Former Assistance Cases $8,888,602,104 -0.5%
Never Assistance Cases $11,758,723,124 -0.5%
Medicaid Never Assistance Cases $6,111,179,415 10.4%
Total Expenditures $5,661,227,597 0.0%
Paternities & Acknowledgements 1,658,287 -1.7%
Orders Established 1,204,644 -3.5%
Full Time Equivalent Staff 54,569 -1.9%
Total Caseload 15,747,140 -0.5%
Current Assistance 1,886,135 -7.6%
Former Assistance 6,821,018 0.5%
Never Assistance 7,039,987 0.5%
Performance Measures:
IV-D PEP 100.11 1.2%
Statewide PEP 96.82 0.4%
Percent of Cases with Orders 81.92 1.2%
Percent of Current Collections 62.98 0.9%
Percent of Arrearage Cases 62.21 0.1%
Cost Effectiveness ($ Change) $5.19 $0.07

 

State Box Scores

Program Charts and Graphs, FY 2012

List of Charts

Cases

Paternities Acknowledged

Collections

Expenditures

Number of Children

Federal Parent and Locator Service (FPLS)


Figure 1: Total and Percentage of IV-D Cases With and Without Support Orders Established for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

The percentage of cases with orders continued to increase in FY 2012.

The percentage of cases with orders continued to increase in FY 2012.

Figure 1 Data: Total Caseload by Current, Former, and Never Assistance and Percentage for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Source: Form OCSE-157 lines 1 and 2
* Note: Data does not reflect the number of cases over which States have no jurisdiction as reported on line 3 of the OCSE-157 report.
Total Caseload* (Millions) 15.6 15.8 15.8 15.8 15.7
With Orders (Millions) 12.4 12.5 12.7 12.8 12.9
Without Orders (Millions) 3.2 3.3 3.1 3.0 2.8
With Orders % 79% 79% 80% 81% 82%
Without Orders % 21% 21% 20% 19% 18%

Figure 2: Number of Cases for Which a Collection Was Made by Current, Former, and Never Assistance for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

The total number of IV-D cases for which a collection was made shows an  increase in the total number of cases in FY 2012 compared to FY 2011.

The total number of IV-D cases for which a collection was made shows an increase in the total number of cases in FY 2012 compared to FY 2011.

Figure 2 Data: Number of Cases for Which a Collection Was Made by Current, Former, and Never Assistance for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Source: Form OCSE-157 line 18
Total (Millions) 8.9 8.9 8.9 9.0 9.2
Current Assistance (Millions) 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.7 0.7
Former Assistance (Millions) 4.0 4.0 3.8 3.9 3.9
Never Assistance (Millions) 4.2 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.6

Figure 3: Paternities Established or Acknowledged for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

In FY 2012, over 1.6 million paternities were established and acknowledged – largely through in-hospital and other acknowledgement programs.

In FY 2012, over 1.6 million paternities were established and acknowledged – largely through in-hospital and other acknowledgement programs.

Figure 3 Data: Paternities Established or Acknowledged for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Source: Forms OCSE-157 lines 10 and 16
1 Includes in-hospital and other paternities acknowledged. Paternity acknowledgements include an unknown number of acknowledgements for children in the IV-D caseload.
Paternity Established (Thousands) 629 643 620 615 588
1 Paternity Acknowledged (Thousands) 1,168 1,167 1,114 1,072 1,070
Total (Thousands) 1,797 1,811 1,734 1,687 1,658

Figure 4: Percentage of Collections Distributed to Current, Former, Never, and Medicaid Never Assistance Cases, FY 2012

Most child support collections were made for families who were never on assistance as shown for FY 2012.

Most child support collections were made for families who were never on assistance as shown for FY 2012.

Figure 4 Data: Percentage of Collections Distributed to Current, Former, Never, and Medicaid Never Assistance Cases, FY 2012: $27.7 Billion Distributed
Source Amount Percentage
Source: Form OCSE-34A line 8
Never Assistance $11.8 billion 42%
Former Assistance $8.9 billion 32%
Current Assistance $9 billion 4%
Families Receiving Medicaid $6.1 billion 22%

Figure 5A: Percentage of Net Undistributed Collections (UDC) by Category, FY 2012 2

Collections held for future distribution still remains the largest component of the undistributed collections by category in FY 2012 compared to FY 2011.

Figure 5A Data: Percentage of Net Undistributed Collections (UDC) by Category, FY 2012 2
Source Percentage
Source: Form OCSE-34A, Part 2, lines 3-7 and 9-13
2 Net UDC is the amount of collections that remained undistributed at the end of the previous quarter.
Held for Future 18%
Tax Offset held up to 6 months 15%
Past 2 Business days 6%
Other 6%
Missing Info 3%
Uncashed 3%
Location of CP or NCP 5%
Unidentified 6%
Legal Dispute & other State 12%

Figure 5B: Percentage of Net Undistributed Collections (UDC) by Age, FY 2012 2

Collections held for future distribution still remains the largest component of the undistributed collections by category in FY 2012 compared to FY 2011.

Collections held for future distribution still remains the largest component of the undistributed collections by category in FY 2012 compared to FY 2011.

Figure 5B Data: Percentage of Net Undistributed Collections (UDC) by Age, FY 2012 2
Source Percentage
Source: Form OCSE-34A, Part 2, lines 14-20
2 Net UDC is the amount of collections that remained undistributed at the end of the previous quarter.
Greater than 2 days less than 30 days 23%
Less than 2 days 8%
Greater than 5 years 6%
Greater than 3 years less than 5 years 2%
Greater than 1 year less than 3 years 5%
Greater than 6 months less than 1 year 5%
Greater than 30 days less than 6 months 24%

 


Figure 6: Total Automated Data Processing (ADP) Expenditures for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

Automated Data Processing (ADP) expenditures decreased 6.8 percent in FY 2012.

Automated Data Processing (ADP) expenditures decreased 6.8 percent in FY 2012.

Figure 6 Data: Total Automated Data Processing (ADP) Expenditures for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Source: Form OCSE-396A, lines 4, 5, and 6, column A+C
Total (Millions) $925 $773 $567 $725 $675

Figure 7: Total Number of Children in the IV-D Program for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

In FY 2012, the number of children in the child support program decreased by 1.0 percent two years in a row.

In FY 2012, the number of children in the child support program decreased by 1.0 percent two years in a row.

Figure 7 Data: Total Number of Children in the IV-D Program for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Source: Form OCSE-157, line 4
Total (Millions) 17,031,940 17,413,972 17,509,344 17,340,482 17,156,552

Figure 8: Number of Unique Persons Matched3 by the Federal Parent Locate Service for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years

The number of unique persons matched increased by approximately 26,000 between FY 2011 and 2012.

The number of unique persons matched increased by approximately 26,000 between FY 2011 and 2012.

Figure 8 Data: Number of Unique Persons Matched 3 by the Federal Parent Locate Service for Five Consecutive Fiscal Years
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
3 The Number of Unique Persons (Noncustodial Parents and Punitive Fathers) Matched is derived by unduplicating SSNs located across all data types (W-4, Quarterly Wage (QW), and Unemployment Insurance (UI)).
# of Persons Matched (Millions) 7.8 8.2 7.7 8.1 8.1
% Change of Persons Matched   5% -6% 5% 0.3%

Figure 9: Federal Offset Net Collections for Five Fiscal Years

Federal Offset collections for FY 2012 were over $2.1 billion.

Federal Offset Net collections for FY 2012 were over $2.1 billion.

Figure 9 Data: Federal Offset Net Collections for Five Fiscal Years
  2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Total NET Collections (Millions) $2,851 $2,191 $2,109 $2,372 $2,155
Regular NET Collections (Millions) $1,988 $2,079 $2,102 $2,372 $2,155
Special NET Collections (Millions) $863 $112 $7 $0 $0

The Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 allowed states to certify nearly 1 million additional non-TANF debts in Processing Year (PY) 2008 that were previously not eligible for tax refund offset. It is estimated that this resulted in at least an additional $200 million collected.

The Economic Stimulus Act of 2008 provided economic stimulus payments of up to $600 ($1,200 if filing a joint return, plus additional amounts for each qualifying child) to be made to over 130 million American households. These payments were eligible for tax refund offset and resulted in an additional $863 million in 'special collections' in PY 2008.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided one-time Economic Recovery Payments (ERP) of $250 to an estimated 60 million recipients of Social Security (SSA), Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Railroad Retirement Benefits (RRB) and Veterans’ Disability Compensation or Pension Benefits. These payments were eligible for administrative offset and resulted in additional 'special collections' of $111,689,930 in PY 2009 and $6,653,690 in PY 2010.

Appendix

Incentive Formulas

CSPIA Incentive Measure Formulas
INCENTIVE MEASURE FORM AND LINE NUMBERS
PATERNITY ESTABLISHMENT PERCENTAGE (PEP): IV-D
Number of Children in the Caseload in the FY or as of the End of the FY Who Were Born Out-of-Wedlockwith Paternity Established or Acknowledged
divided by
Number of Children in the Caseload as of the End of the Preceding FY Who Were Born Out-of-Wedlock
OCSE-157, Line 6
divided by
OCSE-157, Line 5a
PATERNITY ESTABLISHMENT PERCENTAGE (PEP): STATEWIDE
Number of Minor Children in the State Born Out-of-Wedlock with Paternity Established or Acknowledged During the FY
divided by
Number of Children in the State Born Out-of-Wedlock During the Preceding FY
OCSE-157, Line 9
divided by
OCSE-157, Line 8a
SUPPORT ORDER ESTABLISHMENT
Number of IV-D Cases with Support Orders
divided by
Number of IV-D Cases
OCSE-157, Line 2
divided by
OCSE-157, Line 1
CURRENT COLLECTIONS
Amount Collected for Current Support in IV-D Cases
divided by
Amount Owed for Current Support in IV-D Cases
OCSE-157, Line 25
divided by
OCSE-157, Line 24
ARREARAGE COLLECTIONS
Number of IV-D Cases Paying Toward Arrears
divided by
Number of IV-D Cases with Arrears Due
OCSE-157, Line 29
divided by
OCSE-157, Line 28
COST-EFFECTIVENESS
Total IV-D Dollars Collected
divided by
Total IV-D Dollars Expended
OCSE-34A, Lines 4b + 4c + 8 + 11 of column (G)
divided by
OCSE-396A, Line 7 columns (A) + (C)
less Line 1(c) columns (A) + (C)
STATE COLLECTION BASE
2 times (Current Assistance + Former Assistance Collections + Medicaid Assistance)
+ Never Assistance Collections
+ Fees Retained by Other States
OCSE-34A:
2 times ((Line 4b, columns A+B+C+D+E)
+ (Line 8, columns A+B+C+D+E))
+ Line 4b, column F + Line 8, column F
+ Line 4c + 11 of column G

 

How an Incentive Payment is Determined

 

Because of the complexity of the incentives formula set forth in section 458 of the Social Security Act, we have included an example of how the system would work in a particular year for State A. Let’s make the following assumptions regarding State A (See Table A):

  • State A’s paternity performance level is 93 percent, making its applicable percent 100 percent (see Table C)
  • State A’s order establishment performance level is 74 percent, making its applicable percent 88 percent (see Table C)
  • State A’s current support collections performance level is 59 percent, making its applicable percent 69 percent (see Table D)
  • State A’s arrearage support collections performance level is 60 percent, making its applicable percent 70 percent (see Table D)
  • State A’s cost-effectiveness ratio is $4.40, making its applicable percent 80 percent (see Table E)
  • State A’s collections base is $50 million (determined by 2 times the collections for Current Assistance, Former Assistance, and Medicaid Never Assistance plus Never Assistance collections and fees retained by other states)
  • The maximum incentive for State A is:

    • $50 million collections base for paternity ($50 mil. times 1.00), plus
    • $44 million collections base for orders ($50 mil. times 0.88), plus
    • $34.5 million collections base for current collections ($50 mil. times 0.69), plus
    • $26.25 million collections base for arrearage collections ($50 mil. times 0.751 times 0.70) plus
    • $30.0 million collections base for cost-effectiveness ($50 million times 0.751 times 0.80) equals
    • Resulting in a maximum incentive base amount of $184.75 million for State A.
Table A
Measure State A’s
Performance Level
Applicable Percent
based on
Performance
Weight State A’s
Collection Base
(assumed to be
$50,000,000)
Paternity Establishment 93% 100% 1.00 $50,000,000
Order Establishment 74% 88% 1.00 $44,000,000
Current Collections 59% 69% 1.00 $34,500,000
Arrearage Collections 60% 70% 0.75 $26,250,000
Cost-Effectiveness $4.40 80% 0.75 $30,000,000
State A’s Maximum Incentive Base Amount       $184,750,000

 

We must now make some assumptions regarding the other States. Let’s assume that there are only two other States in our country--and the maximum incentive base amount is $84 million for State B and $50 million for State C, making the total maximum incentive base amount $318.75 million for all three States (See Table B).

  • We must now determine what is State A’s share of the $318.75 million. It is 58 percent ($184.75 divided by $318.75).
Table B
State Maximum Incentive
Base Amounts
State’s Share
of $318,750,000
Incentive Payment
Pool $461,000,000
A $184,750,000 0.58 $267,199,216
B $84,000,000 0.26 $121,487,059
C $50,000,000 0.16 $72,313,725
Totals $318,750,000 1.00 $461,000,000

 

  • Let us assume it is FY 2003, so the incentive payment pool for the FY is $461 million (see table F).
  • Since State A’s share is 0.58, this state has earned 58 percent of the $461 million incentive payment pool that Congress is allowing, or $267.2 million ($461 mil. x 0.58) incentive payment for this particular fiscal year.

If the Paternity Establishment or Support Order Performance Level Is:

Table C2 - Performance Levels
At Least: But Less
Than:
The Applicable
Percentage Is:
At Least: But Less
Than:
The Applicable
Percentage Is:
80%   100% 64% 65% 74%
79% 80% 98% 63% 64% 73%
78% 79% 96% 62% 63% 72%
77% 78% 94% 61% 62% 71%
76% 77% 92% 60% 61% 70%
75% 76% 90% 59% 60% 69%
74% 75% 88% 58% 59% 68%
73% 74% 86% 57% 58% 67%
72% 73% 84% 56% 57% 66%
71% 72% 82% 55% 56% 65%
70% 71% 80% 54% 55% 64%
69% 70% 79% 53% 54% 63%
68% 69% 78% 52% 53% 62%
67% 68% 77% 51% 52% 61%
66% 67% 76% 50% 51% 60%
65% 66% 75% 0% 50% 0%

 

If the Current Collections or Arrearage Collections Performance Level Is:

Table D3 - Performance Levels
At Least: But Less
Than:
The Applicable
Percentage Is:
At Least: But Less
Than:
The Applicable
Percentage Is:
80%   100% 59% 60% 69%
79% 80% 98% 58% 59% 68%
78% 79% 96% 57% 58% 67%
77% 78% 94% 56% 57% 66%
76% 77% 92% 55% 56% 65%
75% 76% 90% 54% 55% 64%
74% 75% 88% 53% 54% 63%
73% 74% 86% 52% 53% 62%
72% 73% 84% 51% 52% 61%
71% 72% 82% 50% 51% 60%
70% 71% 80% 49% 50% 59%
69% 70% 79% 48% 49% 58%
68% 69% 78% 47% 48% 57%
67% 68% 77% 46% 47% 56%
66% 67% 76% 45% 46% 55%
65% 66% 75% 44% 45% 54%
64% 65% 74% 43% 55% 53%
63% 64% 73% 42% 43% 52%
62% 63% 72% 41% 42% 51%
61% 62% 71% 40% 41% 50%
60% 61% 70% 0% 40% 0%

 

If the Cost-Effectiveness Performance Level Is:

Table E4- Cost-Effectiveness Performance Levels
At Least: But Less
Than:
The Applicable
Percentage Is:
5.00   100%
4.50 4.99 90%
4.00 4.50 80%
3.50 4.00 70%
3.00 3.50 60%
2.50 3.00 50%
2.00 2.50 40%
0.00 2.00 0%

 

Table F - Incentive Pool Payment, FY 2001-2012

The incentive payment pool is:

  • $429,000,000 for fiscal year 2001
  • $450,000,000 for fiscal year 2002
  • $461,000,000 for fiscal year 2003
  • $454,000,000 for fiscal year 2004
  • $446,000,000 for fiscal year 2005
  • $458,000,000 for fiscal year 2006
  • $471,000,000 for fiscal year 2007
  • $483,000,000 for fiscal year 2008
  • $504,000,000 for fiscal year 2009
  • $504,000,000 for fiscal year 2010
  • $513,000,000 for fiscal year 2011
  • $526,000,000 for fiscal year 2012

The incentive payment pool after FY 2008 is the amount of the incentive payment pool for the preceding FY, multiplied by the percentage by which the CPI for that preceding FY exceeds the CPI for the second preceding FY.

The CPI for a FY is the average of the CPI for the 12 month period ending on Sept. 30 of the FY. The CPI means the last CPI for all-urban consumers published by the United States Department of Labor. The NOT seasonally adjusted CPI numbers are used.

The percentage increase between the preceding FY (FY 2008) and second preceding FY (FY 2007) is about 4.44%.   So, $483 million (the FY 2008 incentive pool amount) plus 4.44% equals about $504 million (the FY 2009 incentive pool amount).  The FY 2012 incentive pool amount ($526 million) was established by the budget submitted by the Office of Legislative Affairs and Budget (OLAB).


1 Because the measure has less weight.

2 Use this table to determine the maximum incentive levels for the paternity establishment and support order performance measures.

3 Use this table to determine the maximum incentive levels for the current and arrearage support collections performance measures.

4 Use this table to determine the maximum incentive level for the cost-effectiveness performance measure.

  • OCSE-157 Report
  • OCSE-34A Report
  • OCSE-396A Report
  • OCSE-75 Report