Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting

The Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (Tribal MIECHV) program provides grants to tribal organizations to develop, implement, and evaluate home visiting programs in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. The Tribal MIECHV program is funded by a 3 percent set-aside from the larger MIECHV program. Tribal MIECHV grants are awarded to Indian tribes, consortia of tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations.

 


Tribal MIECHV Program Goals

  • Support the development of happy, healthy, and successful American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) children and families through a coordinated home visiting strategy that addresses critical maternal and child health, development, early learning, family support, and child abuse and neglect prevention needs.
  • Implement high-quality, culturally-relevant, evidence-based home visiting programs in AIAN communities.
  • Expand the evidence base around home visiting interventions with Native populations.
  • Support and strengthen cooperation and coordination and promoting linkages among various early childhood programs, resulting in coordinated, comprehensive early childhood systems.

Tribal MIECHV Grant Activities

  • Conduct a needs and readiness assessment of the tribal community or communities.
  • Develop a plan to address identified needs by implementing high-quality, culturally-relevant evidence-based home visiting programs.
  • Provide high-quality, culturally-relevant, evidence-based home visiting services to pregnant women, expectant fathers, and parents and caregivers of children under age 5.
  • Establish, measure, and report on progress toward meeting legislatively mandated benchmarks for participating children and families.
  • Conduct rigorous local program evaluation activities to address local priorities and build the evidence base around home visiting in AIAN communities.

Tribal MIECHV Home Visiting Models

ACF conducted a systematic review of home visiting models previously implemented in tribal communities and found that none meet HHS’s “evidence-based” criteria for use with AIAN populations.  Home visiting models selected by Tribal MIECHV grantees are considered “promising approaches” and must be rigorously evaluated.

Home visiting models selected by Tribal MIECHV grantees include Parents as Teachers, Family Spirit, Nurse Family Partnership, Healthy Families America, Healthy Steps, Parent Child Assistance Program, and SafeCare Augmented. In many cases, grantees have enhanced or adapted models to fit culture and context.