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Expanding Services for Children and Youth Exposed to Domestic Violence, 2010 - 2013

Published: August 24, 2012
Audience:
Family Violence Prevention and Services (FVPSA)
Topics:
Children Exposed to Domestic Violence
Types:
fact sheet

Approximately 15.5 million children are exposed to domestic violence every year.  Nationwide, nearly half of all residents of domestic violence shelters supported through the Family Violence Prevention and Services Program (FVPSA Program) are children.  These children, youth, and their parents need quality services to address the trauma they have experienced and to break the cycle of violence. 

The FVPSA Program is committed to expanding comprehensive services for children and youth exposed to domestic violence to ensure that every child receives a trauma-informed and developmentally appropriate response to the violence they have experienced. 

In Fiscal Year 2010, the Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) awarded FVPSA grants to four statewide capacity building projects and one national technical assistance provider.  These five grantees will serve as leaders for expanding a broader network for support, developing evidence-based interventions for children, youth and parents exposed to domestic violence, and building national implementation strategies that will lead to local improvements in domestic violence programs and then community-based interventions. 

State Projects Overview
Four State Domestic Violence Coalitions will lead statewide efforts to improve practice:

  • The New Jersey Coalition For Battered Women will expand an established model program for children who have been exposed to domestic violence.  The Peace:  A Learned Solution (PALS) program provides children ages 3 through 17 with creative arts therapy to help them heal from exposure to domestic violence.
  • The Wisconsin Coalition Against Domestic Violence will launch the Safe Together Project, which will increase the capacity of Wisconsin domestic violence programs, particularly those serving under-represented or culturally specific populations, to support non-abusing parents and mitigate the impact of exposure to domestic violence on their children.
  • The Alaska Network on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault will improve services and responses to Alaska’s families by addressing the lack of coordination between domestic violence agencies and the child welfare system.  Their work will include cross education and development of an integrated training curriculum and policies.  This project will also include creation of a community based multi-disciplinary team in four Alaskan communities: Dillingham, Fairbanks, Juneau, and Kodiak. 

The Idaho Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence will launch the Idaho Alliance to Expand Services for Children and Youth Exposed to Domestic Violence.  The Idaho Alliance is focused on building and sustaining domestic violence programs’ capacity to deliver trauma informed and developmentally sensitive parent/child services for non-abusing parents, children, and youth affected by domestic violence as well as other trauma.