Early Head Start Family and Child Experiences Study (Baby FACES), 2007-2014

Project Overview

The Early Head Start Family and Child Experiences Study (Baby FACES) continues a series of ongoing descriptive studies aimed at maintaining an up-to-date, extensive knowledge base to support Early Head Start policies and programs. Building on the findings from the Survey of Early Head Start Programs, and similar in design to the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), Baby FACES has five main goals:

  • Provide descriptive information about Early Head Start services offered, their frequency and intensity;
  • Identify key characteristics of families currently served in Early Head Start;
  • Investigate how programs individualize services to meet family needs;
  • Learn how Early Head Start children and families are faring over time; and
  • Explore associations between the type and quality of Early Head Start services and child and family well-being.

The study employs a longitudinal cohort design that identifies a representative sample of 89 Early Head Start programs in 2009 and two cohorts of families: (1) a perinatal group, and (2) a group of infants about 1 year old. Data are collected annually, in the spring, until the sample children reach 3 years of age and complete the Early Head Start program, with a supplemental interview about transition activities with some parents when the children are 3 ½. The study has a wide group of experts in Early Head Start and early childhood development serving as consultants.

The point of contact is Amy Madigan.

 

Project Team

Federal Project Officer:

Amy Madigan
Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
Administration for Children and Families, DHHS
370 L'Enfant Promenade SW, 7th Floor W
Washington, DC 20447

Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.:

Cheri Vogel, Project Director
Kimberly Boller, Principal Investigator
Laura Kalb, Survey Director

Research Team and Technical Workgroup Members:

Ellen Eliason Kisker, Twin Peaks Partners, LLC
Judith Jerald, Save the Children
Brenda Jones Harden, University of Maryland
Tammy Mann, Campagna Center
Catherine Ayoub, Harvard University
Lisa Berlin, University of Maryland
Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Columbia University
Margaret Burchinal, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Judith Carta, University of Kansas
Michael Foster, University of Alabama
Carol Hammer, Temple University
Helen Raikes, University of Nebraska
Lori Roggman, Utah State University

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