Home Visiting View all reports on this topic

Topic Overview

In collaboration with the Health Resources and Services Administration, OPRE is managing a number of evaluation activities related to the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting program. Major projects include the Tribal Research Center on Early Childhood and Tribal Home Visiting Evaluation Institute, the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness project, and The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Evaluation.

Projects on this Topic

  • Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation

    The Advisory Committee on the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program Evaluation is authorized by Section 511 (g) (1) of Title V of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 701 et seq.), as amended by Section 2951 of the Patient Protection...

  • American Indian and Alaska Native Early Childhood Needs Assessment (AI/AN EC Needs Assessment) Design Project, 2014 – 2016

    The American Indian and Alaska Native Early Childhood Needs Assessment (AI/AN EC Needs Assessment) design project seeks to lay a foundation for understanding the need for early childhood services in American Indian and Alaska Native communities. This project will outline a series of designs for future studies that will inform a national assessment of the unmet need for early childhood care, education, and home visiting services (prenatal to age 5) in tribal communities...

  • An Exploratory Study: Implications of Immigration Enforcement Activities for the Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families, 2012-2014

    The Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE), in collaboration with the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), has initiated this project to explore...

  • Assessing the Evidence: Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness, 2011-2020

    The Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness project (HomVEE), is a transparent, systematic review of the evidence base for multiple home visiting programs for pregnant women and young children...

  • Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) Next Generation, 2015 - 2022

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project demonstrated that applying behavioral insights to challenges facing human services programs can improve program operations and outcomes at relatively low cost. The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency Next Generation project will continue ACF’s exploration of the application of behavioral science to the programs and target populations of ACF. This next generation project, launched in September 2015...

  • Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) Research Portfolio

    Many human services programs are designed such that individuals must make active decisions and go through a series of steps in order to benefit from them — from deciding which programs to apply for, to completing forms, attending meetings, showing proof of eligibility, and arranging travel and child care. Program designers often implicitly assume that individuals will carefully consider options and make decisions that maximize their well-being. But over the past 30 years...

  • Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS), 2010-2016

    Many human services programs are designed such that individuals must make active decisions and go through a series of steps in order to benefit from them — from deciding which programs to apply for, to completing forms, attending meetings...

  • Building Bridges and Bonds (B3), 2014-2019

    Building Bridges and Bonds (B3) is a rigorous evaluation study of responsible fatherhood programs designed to answer multiple practice-relevant research questions. The first year of the contract is a planning period that will involve gathering input...

  • Design Options for Home Visiting Evaluation (DOHVE), 2010-2016

    The Design Options for Home Visiting Evaluation (DOHVE) project supports the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program and includes two key components...

  • Early Care and Education Scholars: Head Start Graduate Student Research Program, 1998-2016

    The Head Start Graduate Student Research grant program is designed to build research capacity in and knowledge of effective early childhood interventions with low-income children and families. The grant program does this by providing support for...

  • Ex-Prisoner Reentry Strategies Study, 2011-2015

    The Ex-Prisoner Reentry Strategies Study, being conducted by The Urban Institute, will document the implementation of selected reentry programs initially funded in FY 2011 under the Responsible Fatherhood grant program...

  • Family Strengthening Scholars, 2014-2016

    The Family Strengthening Scholars grant program is designed to build research capacity in the healthy marriage/responsible fatherhood field (HM/RF). These grants are to support dissertation research on HM/RF policy issues and are meant to build...

  • Fatherhood and Marriage Local Evaluation (FaMLE) and Cross-Site Project, 2013-2018

    The purpose of the Fatherhood and Marriage Local Evaluation and Cross-Site Project is to support high quality data collection, strengthen local evaluations, and conduct cross-site performance measures analysis for the third cohort (2015-2020) of Responsible Fatherhood and Healthy Marriage grantees...

  • Head Start’s National Research Conference on Early Childhood

    Head Start's 12th National Research Conference on Early Childhood was held July 7-9, 2014, at the Grand Hyatt in Washington, D.C. Please check back in Summer 2015 for information on the next Conference. Since 1991, Head Start's Biennial...

  • Hispanic Research Work Group, 2011-2014

    ACF’s Hispanic Research Work Group brings together experts in a wide range of content areas relevant to ACF’s mission to assist ACF/OPRE in identifying research priorities concerning low-income, Hispanic families.

  • MIHOPE Check-In Project, 2014-2019

    The purpose of the MIHOPE Check-In project is to annually update contact information for families who participated in the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE). MIHOPE is examining child and family outcomes for participants in the...

  • Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE), 2011-2015

    On March 23, 2010, the President signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA) (P.L. 111-148). The law authorized the creation of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program to address the diverse...

  • Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation – Strong Start (MIHOPE-Strong Start), 2012-2016

    The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start (MIHOPE-Strong Start) will evaluate the effectiveness of two evidence-based home visiting models to improve birth and health outcomes for expectant families enrolled in Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). The two models that will be studied in MIHOPE-Strong Start are Healthy Families America (HFA) and Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), both of which have...

  • Network of Infant Toddler Researchers (NITR)

    The Network of Infant Toddler Researchers (NITR) was founded by OPRE in 2011 in order to bring together leading researchers studying pregnancy and the first three years of life. OPRE convened NITR to answer questions of interest to ACF and programs...

  • Parents and Children Together (PACT) Evaluation, 2011-2016

    To learn about the implementation and effects of these programs, ACF awarded a contract in 2011 to Mathematica Policy Research to conduct the Parents and Children Together (PACT) evaluation. The evaluation has multiple components: separate impact and...

  • Secondary Data Analyses of Strengthening Families Datasets, 2014-2015

    OPRE awarded eight cooperative agreements to fund research to conduct secondary data analysis of archived ACF data, specifically the Building Strong Families (BSF), Supporting Healthy Marriage (SHM), and Community Healthy Marriage Initiative (CHMI)...

  • Study of Coordination of Tribal TANF and Child Welfare Services Grants, 2011-2016

    The Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) is undertaking a descriptive study to document the approaches and strategies utilized by tribal organizations awarded cooperative agreements under the Coordination of Tribal TANF and Child Welfare...

  • The Fatherhood Research and Practice Network, 2013-2018

    The Fatherhood Research and Practice Network (FRPN) is a cooperative agreement awarded to Temple University with a subcontract to the Center for Policy Research in Denver, CO. The FRPN will pursue three goals:..

  • Toxic Stress and Self-Regulation Reports

    OPRE has commissioned a series of four inter-related reports titled Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress from a team at the Center for Child and Social Policy at Duke University. The team is also preparing a brief focused on implications of these reports for adolescence and young adulthood. The first report, Foundations for Understanding Self-Regulation from an Applied Developmental Perspective provides a comprehensive framework for understanding...

  • Tribal Early Childhood Research Center, 2011 - 2016

    The Tribal Early Childhood Research Center (TRC) seeks to address gaps in early childhood research with American Indian and Alaska Natives through partnerships with tribal Head Start, Early Head Start, child care, and home visiting programs. The goals of the TRC are to engage in a participatory research process and to build capacity for researchers to work effectively with early childhood programs in tribal communities.  The grant award...

  • Tribal Evaluation Institute, 2010-2016 & 2015-2018

    The Tribal Evaluation Institute (TEI) provides technical assistance, leadership, and support to promote excellence in community-based research and evaluation of Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV)...

  • Work, Family, and Health Network (WFHN)

    “Family-friendly” or “work-life” polices have become increasingly prevalent in the United States, but few longitudinal studies using experimental design have been implemented to test such policies. Moreover, knowledge about work-life policies aimed at low-wage workers is scant. To address this gap, OPRE supported a study by the Work, Family and Health Network (WFHN) of the National Institute for Child Health and Development (NICHD).

    WFHN implemented a workplace...