A Descriptive Study of Tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Programs

Published: November 8, 2013
Topics:
Self-Sufficiency, Welfare & Employment
Projects:
Descriptive Study of Tribal Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) Programs, 2011-2013 | Learn more about this project
Types:
Reports

This publication provides an in-depth, systematic description of program implementation, operations, outputs, and outcomes of four Tribal TANF programs (the Navajo Nation Program for Self Reliance, Tanana Chiefs Conference, Athabascan Self-Sufficiency Assistance Project, and South Puget Intertribal Planning Agency).  The publication also identifies promising practices and other areas for further study.

Overall, the study found that tribes use the flexibility of Tribal TANF to create diverse programs that reflect their unique circumstances, opportunities, and cultures.  Elements of tribal culture were evident in the program design, in the way program staff and clients interacted, and in the types of activities in which clients were engaged.  The Tribal TANF programs in the study generally focus on the broad goal of self-sufficiency, beyond the narrower goal of employment.