Quick Facts

  • More than 1700 women

    were murdered by men in the United States in 2012, and more than 90% were killed by someone they knew, according to the Violence Policy Center (VPC).

    Intimate Partner Homicide Prevention by the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, an FVPSA-funded resource center, explores the most tragic consequence of domestic violence and offers a variety of tools and information towards its prevention. 

  • 51.7%

    of American Indian/Alaska Native women experience physical violence by an intimate partner during their lifetimes, according to the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey.

    The National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (http://www.niwrc.org), supported by the Family Violence Prevention and Services Program, enhances the capacity of American Indian and Alaska Native tribes, Native Hawaiians, and Tribal and Native Hawaiian organizations to respond to domestic violence.

  • A majority of victims

    of sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence experience their first victimization before age 25, with a substantial proportion experiencing victimization in childhood or adolescence, according to National Criminal Justice Reference Center.

    Visit PreventIPV.org for more information about primary prevention of intimate partner violence and to learn about the work of the IPV Prevention Council and allied organizations. 

  • 44% of lesbian women and 26% of gay men

    experience rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner at some point in their lifetime, shows the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey.

    FYSB's Family Violence Prevention and Services Program exists to ensure that ALL victims of domestic violence have access to the services and supports that they need to live a life free of abuse. 

  • Multiracial and American Indian/Alaska Native women

    are at greater risk for rape, stalking, and intimate partner violence, shows the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey.

    FYSB believes that supporting programs that provide culturally competent services is key to ensure that domestic violence victims in racial and ethnic minority communities receive appropriate services.

  • 27% of women and 12% of men

    have experienced some form of intimate partner violence (IPV) in their lifetimes and reported serious short- or long-term impacts, such as post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and injury, according to the CDC.

    FYSB urges communities to continue critical efforts to prevent this widespread public health issue. Visit PreventIPV.org for more information about primary prevention of IPV. 

  • 71% of female and 58% of male victims

    first experienced intimate partner violence before age 25, according to the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey.

    FYSB believes the prevention of intimate partner violence should begin at an early age. For prevention tools and approaches, visit PreventIPV.org

  • 9,641 victim requests for services

    including emergency shelter, went unmet in one day because domestic violence programs did not have the resources to provide these services, according to the National Census of Domestic Violence Services.

    This finding highlights the need for community-based, culturally relevant, language accessible and trauma-informed services and supports. Learn about the Family & Youth Services Bureau’s Specific Issues Resource Centers.

  • 3 out of 4

    survivors who used support groups, counseling, supportive services and legal advocacy from a domestic violence program rate these services “very helpful.”

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services funds resource centers to inform and strengthen domestic violence intervention and prevention efforts at the individual, community, and societal levels. Meet the Domestic Violence Resource Network.

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