Evaluation

ANA conducts impact evaluation visits with one-third of its current grantees each year, amounting to approximately 70 percent of all ending grants. Visits occur during the three months prior to or after a project’s end date. Usually lasting a full work day, impact visits provide ANA the opportunity to meet with project staff and beneficiaries in order to collect qualitative and quantitative information.

The purpose of the impact visit is threefold:

  1. To assess the impact of ANA funding on Native American communities, in accordance with the Native American Programs Act of 1974 (42 USC 2991) Section 811 (42 USC 2992), and the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993;
  2. To increase knowledge about the successes and challenges of ANA grantees, improving ANA service delivery; and
  3. To increase transparency and collaboration by sharing the unique stories of ANA grantees with native communities and the public.

ANA utilizes information collected to bolster its project planning and development, pre-application, and post-award training and technical assistance offerings to tribes and Native American organizations so that applicants understand the common pitfalls of ANA projects and are better equipped to develop, and later implement, realistic project work plans.

Find out more about impact evaluation visits.

After each impact visit season, ANA analyzes data collected to generate a Report to Congress on the Impact and Effectiveness of ANA Projects. The congressional impact report includes:

  • An executive summary that presents key data and findings from all projects visited; and
  • A two-page report for each project visited that consists of a snapshot of key data from the particular project, a brief background of the grantee, and a narrative of the project’s purpose, objectives, outcomes, and impact on the community.

 

Key Research, Data & Reports

  • Youth and elders at the Pueblo of Pojoaque

    FY 2016 Report to Congress on Outcome Evaluations of Administration for Native Americans Projects

    The Native American Programs Act requires ANA to provide, no less than every 3 years, "evaluation of projects . . . including evaluations that describe and measure the impact of such projects, their effectiveness in achieving stated goals, their impact on related programs, and their structure and mechanisms for delivery of services[.]"

    The purposes of these evaluations are to:

    Assess the activities and outcomes of ANA funding in Native communities in accordance with NAPA and the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993; Record the successes and challenges of ANA grantees in order to improve the capacity of ANA grantees; and Produce relevant data on Native American community-driven projects that is useful to Native American leaders, planners, tribal government agencies, and Native American service providers.

    To satisfy such requirements, ANA conducts end-of-project evaluations that address two main questions: (1) to what extent did the project meet its established objectives and (2) how does the grantee describe the impact of its project on those intended to benefit within its community? This report addresses these questions.

  • Group of youth sitting in a semi-circle

    QuaNative: I-LEAD Projects

    The Administration for Native Americans' QuaNative (QN) series examines different topics utilizing ANA's qualitative and quantitative data. This QuaNative focuses on the ANA Native Youth Initiative for Leadership, Empowerment, and Development (I-LEAD).

  • Group of people in a language class

    FY 2015 Outcome Evaluations of ANA Projects Report to Congress

    Among the purposes of ANA outcome evaluations are to record the successes and challenges of ANA grantees in order to improve their capacity and to produce relevant data on Native American community-driven projects that is useful to Native American communities. This report provides an overview of ANA projects visited in 2015, along with brief summary reports for each of the 42 projects evaluated and included in the 2015 data set, arranged by state. These summaries include a snapshot of data for each project, including full-time equivalent jobs created, Elders and youth involved, partnerships formed, and resources leveraged, among other figures. Each summary provides background and an overview of the project goals and objectives, and describes the accomplishments and perceived impact the grantee had in their communities.

  • 2013 ANA Outcomes Report Cover

    2013 Outcome Evaluations of ANA Projects

    ANA conducts project-end outcome evaluations that address two main questions: (1) to what extent did the project meet its established objectives and (2) how does the grantee describe the impact of its project on those intended to benefit within its community? This report addresses these questions for projects ending in 2013.

Last Reviewed: August 7, 2019