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The HHS Administration for Native Americans' (ANA) funding is unique in that it is community-based and open to all not just Federally recognized tribes, but also state-recognized tribes, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders, Native Non-Profit Organizations, and Urban Indian organizations.

This video gives an overview of these opportunities, including what types of funding ANA offers and the first steps in how to apply.

The Native American Programs Act requires ANA to provide, no less than every 3 years, "evaluation of projects . . . including evaluations that describe and measure the impact of such projects, their effectiveness in achieving stated goals, their impact on related programs, and their structure and mechanisms for delivery of services[.]"

The purposes of these evaluations are to:

  • Assess the activities and outcomes of ANA funding in Native communities in accordance with NAPA and the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993;
  • Record the successes and challenges of ANA grantees in order to improve the capacity of ANA grantees; and
  • Produce relevant data on Native American community-driven projects that is useful to Native American leaders, planners, tribal government agencies, and Native American service providers.

To satisfy such requirements, ANA conducts end-of-project evaluations that address two main questions: (1) to what extent did the project meet its established objectives and (2) how does the grantee describe the impact of its project on those intended to benefit within its community? This report addresses these questions.

Technical Assistance staff and ANA Division of Program Operations Director, Mia Strickland, present the 2019 FOAs. Listen in to learn about how the FOAs have changed from last year, and to review ANA's application requirements.

Testimony of Jean Hovland on the Administration for Native Americans

ANA’s efforts to promote social and economic development in Native American communities.
February 27, 2019

Testimony of Jean Hovland on ANA’s efforts to promote social and economic development in Native American communities, in light of the 45th Anniversary of the Native American Programs Act.

This manual and accompanying training are designed to help applicants develop a clear and concise application. Applicants will also learn to determine the fundamental steps necessary to complete their individual projects. Ultimately, an applicant will be able to tailor their project plan to alleviate the identified condition preventing the attainment of their community’s goals.Pre-application trainings are designed to provide prospective ANA applicants with basic information on the federal application process.

Learn to build online relationships with your communities in this step-by-step guide, which will lead you through the process of creating an organized, realistic, and strategic social media plan for your organization.

These guided activities are designed for the social media novice, to be done with two or more people from your organization, led by a designated social media administrator and with support from a top-level decision maker (executive director, tribal chief, manager).

Webinar: Food for Thought

Eating your way to mental health
June 19, 2018

Diagnosable mental illness affects over 21% of the American Indian/Alaska Native population (SAMHSA). And while there is a general decline in rates of violence and drug abuse, rates of suicide, marijuana use and depression diagnosis are on the rise. Many factors play a role in mental illness, and in honor of Mental Health Awareness Month, we'll be exploring just one: Food.

Healthy choices in food, improved food security and increased subsistence farming may play a role in improving mental health. In this webinar, Jacqueline Gray PhD, Director of the Seven Generations Center of Excellence in Native Behavioral Health, and ANA Grantee, Ndee Bikiyaa (The People's Farm), will be exploring the ways in which you and your community can eat your way to mental health.
 

The key to a well-developed project as well as a competitive grant application is to have a firm foundation in community-based planning. Community planning and preparedness will enable you to easily move forward on projects and funding opportunities that align with your community's long-term goals.

You can view the webinar  Visit disclaimer pageon ACF's YouTube channel.
 

ANA Messenger: Spring 2018 edition

Focusing on Native Youth
April 30, 2018

 

The ANA Messenger is a quarterly publication of the Administration for Native Americans, a program office within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families. This edition has a focus on Native youth who are growing into leaders and mentors through the Native Youth Initiative for Leadership, Empowerment, and Development ( I-LEAD) grant program.

ANA conducts project-end outcome evaluations that address two main questions: (1) to what extent did the project meet its established objectives and (2) how does the grantee describe the impact of its project on those intended to benefit within its community? This report addresses these questions for projects ending in 2013.