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Opportunity Zones were created under the Tax Cuts and Job Acts of 2017 as a tool to spur economic development and job creation in eligible low-income areas which have difficulty attracting new businesses and jobs. What does this mean for Native Communities? This webinar will walk through the fundamentals of Opportunity Zones, and how the designated communities can be better equipped to work with legal and tax professionals to harness the tax benefits of creating or expanding Native businesses in such areas.
 

The Native American Programs Act requires ANA to provide, no less than every 3 years, "evaluation of projects . . . including evaluations that describe and measure the impact of such projects, their effectiveness in achieving stated goals, their impact on related programs, and their structure and mechanisms for delivery of services[.]"

The purposes of these evaluations are to:

  • Assess the activities and outcomes of ANA funding in Native communities in accordance with NAPA and the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993;
  • Record the successes and challenges of ANA grantees in order to improve the capacity of ANA grantees; and
  • Produce relevant data on Native American community-driven projects that is useful to Native American leaders, planners, tribal government agencies, and Native American service providers.

To satisfy such requirements, ANA conducts end-of-project evaluations that address two main questions: (1) to what extent did the project meet its established objectives and (2) how does the grantee describe the impact of its project on those intended to benefit within its community? This report addresses these questions.

Active Grants in Social and Economic Development Strategies – Alaska

On Thursday, July 18th the National Council of Urban Indian Health (NCUIH) and the Administration for Native Americans (ANA), Administration for Children and Families at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) hosted a Virtual Dialogue on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women. This event focused on building the capacity of urban Indian organizations (UIOs) to contribute to local MMIW efforts.

This Human Trafficking Awareness webinar will offer projects on the development of anti-trafficking strategies, policies, and programs to prevent human trafficking, build health and human service capacity to respond to human trafficking, increase victim identification and access to services, and strengthen health and well-being outcomes of survivors of human trafficking.

This manual and accompanying training are designed to help applicants develop a clear and concise application. Applicants will also learn to determine the fundamental steps necessary to complete their individual projects. Ultimately, an applicant will be able to tailor their project plan to alleviate the identified condition preventing the attainment of their community’s goals.Pre-application trainings are designed to provide prospective ANA applicants with basic information on the federal application process.

Learn to build online relationships with your communities in this step-by-step guide, which will lead you through the process of creating an organized, realistic, and strategic social media plan for your organization.

These guided activities are designed for the social media novice, to be done with two or more people from your organization, led by a designated social media administrator and with support from a top-level decision maker (executive director, tribal chief, manager).

This webinar reviews the variety of language assessment tools, and gives an overview of providing staff training and support in their use.

The key to a well-developed project as well as a competitive grant application is to have a firm foundation in community-based planning. Community planning and preparedness will enable you to easily move forward on projects and funding opportunities that align with your community's long-term goals.

You can view the webinar Visit disclaimer page on ACF's YouTube channel.
 

ANA Messenger: Spring 2018 edition

Focusing on Native Youth
April 30, 2018

 

The ANA Messenger is a quarterly publication of the Administration for Native Americans, a program office within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families. This edition has a focus on Native youth who are growing into leaders and mentors through the Native Youth Initiative for Leadership, Empowerment, and Development ( I-LEAD) grant program.