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  • IM-12-01

    This Information Memorandum (IM) provides information on the Interim Final Rule for Title IV-E of the Social Security Act including provisions and technical amendments necessary to implement a Tribal Title IV-E program.
  • IM-09-02

    This Information Memorandum (IM) provides information on the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Public Law (P.L.) 110-351); automation requirements and options for Tribes operating a title IV-E program pursuant to section 479B of the Social Security Act.
  • PI-12-06

    This Program Instruction (PI) provides instruction to Tribes on the June 30, 2012 Submission of the Annual Progress and Services Report (APSR) required under Title IV-B of the Social Security Act (the Act) for the Stephanie Tubbs Jones Child Welfare Services and Promoting Safe and Stable Families (PSSF) Programs, and the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (CFCIP), including the Education and Training Vouchers (ETV) program; submission of the CFS-101, Part I, Annual Budget Request; Part II, Annual Summary of Child and Family Services; and Part III, Annual Expenditures for Title IV-B, Subparts 1 and 2.
  • IM-12-03

    This Information Memorandum (IM) provides information on Promoting the Safe, Appropriate, and Effective Use of Psychotropic Medication for Children in Foster Care.
  • Tribes with Approved Title IV-E Plans

    The following tribes have an approved title IV-E plan to operate a foster care, adoption assistance, and, at tribal option, guardianship assistance program:
  • Tribal Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP)

    The following resources provide information for tribes interested in operating title IV-E programs.
  • Tribal Courts and Child Welfare: Overcoming Challenges to Working With States

    This episode, 'Overcoming Challenges to Working With States', is part of a series featuring the work of Tribal Court Improvement Program grantees. The episode shares examples of Tribal court and Tribal child welfare agencies navigating legal and jurisdictional challenges from the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska and the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, told by Tribal social services court staff, respectively.
  • Tribal Courts and Child Welfare: Being Family Centered

    Many Tribal courts are responsible for protecting the safety, health, and well-being of Tribal children and families. In addition to those responsibilities—which are also held by State, county, and Federal courts—some Tribal courts may also be responsible for recognizing Tribal customs and traditions regarding child rearing and preserving and strengthening children’s cultural and ethnic identity, where possible. This impacts how Tribal courts partner with child welfare departments to support family reunification and strengthen a family’s connection to their Tribe and its culture.
  • Tribal Federal Medical Assistance Percentage Look-Up Table for FY 2020

    This report provides information for determining tribes’ Federal Medical Assistance Percentages (FMAPs) for fiscal year 2020.
  • Tribal Federal Medical Assistance Percentage Reference Table for FY 2020

    This report provides the Federal Medical Assistance Percentages (FMAPs) for fiscal year 2020 as well as relevant per capita income data for tribes expressing interest in operating title IV-E programs.

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