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Many Tribal courts are responsible for protecting the safety, health, and well-being of Tribal children and families. In addition to those responsibilities—which are also held by State, county, and Federal courts—some Tribal courts may also be responsible for recognizing Tribal customs and traditions regarding child rearing and preserving and strengthening children’s cultural and ethnic identity, where possible. This impacts how Tribal courts partner with child welfare departments to support family reunification and strengthen a family’s connection to their Tribe and its culture.

This episode, 'Overcoming Challenges to Working With States', is part of a series featuring the work of Tribal Court Improvement Program grantees. The episode shares examples of Tribal court and Tribal child welfare agencies navigating legal and jurisdictional challenges from the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska and the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, told by Tribal social services court staff, respectively.

Child welfare and social services agencies must work in collaboration with juvenile and family courts. Both are responsible for protecting children and ensuring their safety, health, and well-being. Tribal courts may take their roles farther when working with their Tribe’s child welfare and social services departments by ensuring culturally competent services are provided to strengthen families and support reunification.

This report provides the Federal Medical Assistance Percentages (FMAPs) for fiscal years 2018 and 2019 as well as relevant per capita income data for tribes expressing interest in operating title IV-E programs.

This report provides information for determining tribes’ Federal Medical Assistance Percentages (FMAPs) for fiscal year 2019.

This PII grantee program manual provides detailed information about the implementation process of the Child and Family Practice Model (CFPM) created by the California Partners for Permanency (CAPP) project.

This report provides information for determining tribes’ Federal Medical Assistance Percentages (FMAPs) for fiscal year 2016.

This guide identifies values and priorities that can foster trust and build the knowledge and skills of Tribes, their evaluation partners, and other stakeholders to conduct more useful and meaningful evaluations of child welfare programs.

JooYeun Chang, the Children’s Bureau Associate Commissioner, presents the upcoming changes to the delivery of training and technical assistance available to support states, tribes, territories, and courts.

PI-14-05

April 23, 2014

This Program Instruction (PI) provides guidance on a new review instrument for state and tribal automated child welfare information systems (S/TACWIS). State and tribes are asked to reach out to your Division of State Systems (DSS) federal analyst to obtain the SRI.