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Dates and Deadlines: Behavioral Strategies to Increase Engagement in Child Support

Published: April 25, 2018

This 13-page brief summarizes an intervention that was tested by the Georgia Division of Child Support Services under OCSE’s Behavioral Interventions for Child Support Services (BICS) demonstration program. A one-page research summary is also available.

Using behavioral principles, Georgia designed new materials and improved old materials, streamlining them to highlight the key information. As a result of the intervention, the number of noncustodial parents who came to the child support office to voluntarily accept service increased by 8.2 percentage points, from 15.1% of the control group to 23.3% of the intervention group. Georgia also modified their face-to-face meeting to make it more useful for noncustodial parents.

Disclaimers:
This brief is not an OCSE publication. MDRC produced this brief under contract to the Washington State Division of Child Support in the Department of Social and Health Services, with funds from the BICS evaluation grant awarded by OCSE to the state. This brief is in the public domain. Permission to reproduce is not necessary.

The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of OCSE, the Administration for Children and Families, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Last Reviewed: March 28, 2019

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