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This PowerPoint presentation is a part of a series of webinars that have discussed Expulsion and Suspension Prevention. This presentation discusses establishing Federal, State, and Local Policies.

From birth, children are curious. You can build on that natural curiosity by developing their interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Use daily routines to build on skills and concepts in math and science. By talking, reading, singing, playing, signing or using other ways to communicate – whatever works best for your preschoolers – you can help develop their STEM skills through play and exploration.

Children begin discovering the world around them from the moment they are born. When you talk, read and sing with your child, you’re helping her learn. It can be as simple as counting your baby’s toes during bath time, asking your toddler a question about the sky, or encouraging preschool-age children to build with blocks!

This brief summarizes what the report says about the science of child development and learning.

ECD Self Assessment Tool for Family Supportive Housing

January 2017 ECD Newsletter

The purpose of this policy statement is to support early childhood programs and States by providing recommendations that promote the development and learning of young children, birth to age five, who are dual language learners (DLLs).2 The statement also provides support to tribal communities in their language revitalization efforts within tribal early childhood programs.

The purpose of this guidance document is to support families, early childhood programs, and States by providing recommendations from the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Education (ED) for preventing and severely limiting expulsion and suspension practices in early childhood settings. Recent data indicate that expulsions and suspensions occur at high rates in preschool settings. This is particularly troubling given that research suggests that school expulsion and suspension practices are associated with negative educational and life outcomes. In addition, stark racial and gender disparities exist in these practices, with young boys of color being suspended and expelled much more frequently than other children. These disturbing trends warrant immediate attention from the early childhood and education fields to prevent, severely limit, and work toward eventually eliminating the expulsion and suspension – and ensure the safety and well-being – of young children in early learning settings.

The purpose of this policy statement is to set a vision and provide recommendations to States, local educational agencies (LEAs), schools, and public and private early childhood programs, from the U.S. Departments of Education (ED) and Health and Human Services (HHS) (the Departments), for increasing the inclusion of infants, toddlers, and preschool children with disabilities in high-quality early childhood programs.

In the last quarter of 2013, homeless shelters across Massachusetts were overwhelmed by an influx of young families. Public agency managers from the Departments of Early Education and Care (EEC), Public Health (DPH) and Housing and Community Development (DHCD) mobilized together to help shelters manage, and to reduce the impact on children from instability, trauma and high-stress. Agency managers pooled financial resources from an infusion of Race To the Top funding and in-tervened to help shelter staff communicate and lead in ways that benefited young children and their families in the short-term, and contributed to children’s positive outcomes over the long-term.