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The goals of the Race to the Top Early Learning Challenge Program (RTT-ELC) are to: 1) support states in building and maintaining high-quality early care and education systems that fully support the highest needs children aged birth to age five, and 2) make sure that the successes and lessons learned from RTT-ELC grantee states are spread across all states. This second goal drives the 50-state Technical Assistance (TA) strategy.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) 50-state Technical Assistance strategy (which is done in partnership with the U.S. Department of Education) lays out the vision for how a comprehensive and coordinated system of high-quality early childhood programs, practice, and public policies should look moving forward.

The purpose of the Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) program is to improve the quality of early learning and development and close the achievement gap for children with high needs. The RTT-ELC grant competition focuses on improving early learning and development for young children by supporting States' efforts to increase the number and percentage of low-income and disadvantaged children in each age group of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers enrolled in high-quality early learning and development programs; and designing and implementing an integrated system of high-quality early learning and development programs and services.

Congress created the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (Home Visiting Program) to support voluntary, evidence-based home visiting services for at-risk pregnant women and parents with young children up to kindergarten entry. The Home Visiting Program builds upon decades of scientific research showing that home visits by a nurse, social worker, early childhood educator, or other trained professional during pregnancy and in the first years of life improve the lives of children and families by preventing child abuse and neglect, supporting positive parenting, improving maternal and child health, and promoting child development and school readiness.

This document summarizes the 1st year of work that grantees completed across the various RTT-ELC reform areas. This summary is by no means an exhaustive collection of the early childhood infrastructure and systems-building work being done in a particular State, but it is a compilation of the work highlighted and documented by grantees as being supported by RTT-ELC funds and as meeting the stated RTT-ELC goals.

NSECE Workforce Study

October 29, 2013

This brief provides the first nationally representative portrait of ECE teachers and caregivers working directly with young children in center-and home-based settings. This portrait reveals that the ECE workforce in 2012 was large, comprised of about one million teachers and caregivers directly responsible for children age zero through five years in center-based programs, and another one million paid home-based teachers and caregivers serving the same age group.

The purpose of the Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) program is to improve the quality of early learning and development and close the achievement gap for children with high needs. The RTT-ELC grant competition focuses on improving early learning and development for young children by supporting States' efforts to increase the number and percentage of low-income and disadvantaged children in each age group of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers enrolled in high-quality early learning and development programs; and designing and implementing an integrated system of high-quality early learning and development programs and services.

This PowerPoint presentation is a briefing and input session for tribal partners.

This document describes the Early Childhood State Advisory Councils status report of 2013

This document discusses how the the social-emotional and behavioral health of young children is a critical aspect of development, and is robustly associated with school readiness and achievement, social relationships with peers and others, and even long-term health outcomes later in life.

This document summarizes the Federal policy recommendations released in December 2014, and profiles innovative policies and workforce supports adopted by States and local leaders around the country who are leading the way by proactively addressing expulsion and suspension in early childhood settings.