ACF Disburses $350 Million in Additional American Rescue Plan Act Funding to Prevent and Respond to Child Abuse and Neglect

May 17, 2021

Today, HHS’ Administration for Children and Families (ACF) announced the American Rescue Plan Act (ARP) funding for the Children’s Bureau, which has been disbursed to states and territories. ARP includes critical funding to support state and community efforts to prevent and respond to child abuse and neglect during a time when children and families are experiencing increased hardship as a result of the pandemic. This is a funding opportunity for communities to further address the complex structural issues that contribute to families becoming involved in the child welfare system.

“During this time of unprecedented stress and hardship, children and families need our support more than ever,” said JooYeun Chang, ACF’s Acting Assistant Secretary. “These funds are an opportunity for communities to further invest in prevention services to help move resources upstream and shift our focus to keeping families together and improving child wellbeing.”

ARP provides an additional $350 million in funding for the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA). This includes an additional $100 million for grants to states to improve Child Protective Service (CPS) systems (under Title I of CAPTA) and an additional $250 million for the Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention (CBCAP) program (authorized by Title II of CAPTA), which awards funding to states, territories, tribes, tribal organizations, and migrant organizations to provide community-based supports and resources to families to reduce the likelihood of child abuse and neglect.

The Children’s Bureau urges all agencies administering CBCAP and the CAPTA State Grant to use the additional funding under these programs in ways that advance racial equity and support for those who have been historically underserved or marginalized,” stated Children’s Bureau Associate Commissioner, Aysha Schomburg. “Ensuring the safety and well-being of all family members and engaging in services designed to prevent child welfare system involvement is key to advancing equity. Creating opportunities for the improvement of communities that have been historically underserved benefits all.”

CPS systems are responsible for responding to allegations of child abuse and neglect. The $100 million in increased funds for the CAPTA state grant will allow states and territories to enhance CPS interventions and services, such as the receipt and investigation of child abuse and neglect reports; risk and safety assessment protocols; training for CPS workers and mandated reporters; programs and procedures for the identification, prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect; and interagency collaboration and community-based partnerships to support families and ensure children’s safety.

The ARP funding for CAPTA and CBCAP state grants is available to all states, the District of Columbia, and the territories, for a total of 56 grantees. A percentage of the CBCAP program AR funding is set aside to make grants to tribes, tribal organizations and migrant populations for community-based child abuse prevention.  These funds will be awarded through a competitive grant process in September 2021. 

To learn more about the CAPTA State Grant and the CBCAP Formula Grant, including the program allotments click here.

 

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Quotes

“During this time of unprecedented stress and hardship, children and families need our support more than ever.”
— Joo Yeun Chang, Acting Assistant Secretary for the Administration of Children and Families
“These funds are an opportunity for communities to further invest in prevention services to help move resources upstream and shift our focus to keeping families together and improving child wellbeing.”
— Joo Yeun Chang, Acting Assistant Secretary for the Administration of Children and Families
“The Children’s Bureau urges all agencies administering CBCAP and the CAPTA State Grant to use the additional funding under these programs in ways that advance racial equity and support for those who have been historically underserved or marginalized.”
— Aysha Schomburg, Associate Commissioner, Children's Bureau
“Ensuring the safety and well-being of all family members and engaging in services designed to prevent child welfare system involvement is key to advancing equity. Creating opportunities for the improvement of communities that have been historically underserved benefits all.”
— Aysha Schomburg, Associate Commissioner, Children's Bureau

Contact

Administration for Children & Families
Office of Communications
330 C Street, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20201

Phone: (202) 401-9215
Fax: (202) 205-9688
Email: media@acf.hhs.gov