New website empowers parents to make personalized child care choices

HHS’ Administration for Children and Families (ACF) announced today the public launch of a new website to assist parents and caregivers in finding child care. ChildCare.gov includes links to state child care search engines and financial assistance available within states to help families find child care, as well as child development and early learning resources.

“Finding child care can be stressful for parents,” said ACF Assistant Secretary Lynn Johnson. “ChildCare.gov lifts up state efforts aimed at identifying the best fit for the unique needs of each family. Some families want center-based care, some want home-based care, some want child care in the evenings or on weekends so mothers and fathers can work different shifts. The website supports state efforts that empower families to find information quickly.”

“An extensive array of family-friendly materials are included as part of the website to help take some of the guesswork out of looking for child care,” said Shannon Christian, director of the Office of Child Care at ACF. “While child care is a work support for parents, it is also a place where young children spend a lot of time. The resources put forth by states on the site will help parents better understand what to look for and what to ask so healthy and informed choices can be made for their families.”

While states design their own child care search websites that reflect their individual early childhood development systems, ChildCare.gov links to the following federally required information within every state and U.S. territory:

ZIP code searches for child care, center-based care, family child care homes, pre-k programs, etc. (including provider profiles so that parents know the location and size of the program, the hours of operation, and other provider related details beyond the program address)

Child care resources (e.g., questions to ask providers, materials related to child development, state licensing requirements and monitoring reports related to health and safety, and links to child care resource and referral agencies which can speak with parents and respond to questions)

Financial assistance for families (e.g., child care, Head Start and other programs for which low- income families may qualify, such as state children’s health insurance, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the nutrition program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and other resources)

Child development and early learning resources (e.g., early intervention screening services for young children, state early learning standards, pre-k, support for children with special needs, Head Start programs, etc.)

Quick Facts

  • ChildCare.gov includes links to state child care search engines and financial assistance available within states to help families find child care, as well as child development and early learning resources.
  • While states design their own child care search websites that reflect their individual early childhood development systems, ChildCare.gov links to the following federally required information within every state and U.S. territory

Quotes

ChildCare.gov lifts up state efforts aimed at identifying the best fit for the unique needs of each family. Some families want center-based care, some want home-based care, some want child care in the evenings or on weekends so mothers and fathers can work different shifts. The website supports state efforts that empower families to find information quickly.
ACF Assistant Secretary Lynn Johnson
An extensive array of family-friendly materials are included as part of the website to help take some of the guesswork out of looking for child care.
Shannon Christian, director of the Office of Child Care at ACF
While child care is a work support for parents, it is also a place where young children spend a lot of time. The resources put forth by states on the site will help parents better understand what to look for and what to ask so healthy and informed choices can be made for their families.
Shannon Christian, director of the Office of Child Care at ACF
Last Reviewed: August 1, 2019
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