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1039 Results for Office of Child Care:

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  • What Congregations Need to Know About Federal Funding for Child Care

    As part of the 1996 welfare reform law, the Federal government is committed to support the work efforts of current and former welfare dependent families working toward self-sufficiency. The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) provides Federal funding to States, Tribes, and Territories to support child care services for low-income children whose parents are working or attending a job training or educational program. Eligible families may receive subsidies for child care through the voucher program.
  • Lo que deben saber los proveedores sobre el programa de ayuda de cuidado infantil para familias

    El gobierno federal y el gobierno estatal pueden ayudar a las familias a pagar el cuidado de sus niños. Puede que las familias a las cuales usted ofrece servicios reúnan los requisitos para recibir esta ayuda, y usted pueda recibir esta ayuda financiera por los servicios que proporciona, convirtiéndose así en un “proveedor participante.”
  • What Providers Should Know About Child Care Assistance for Families

    What Providers Should Know About Child Care Assistance for Families
  • Tribal TANF and CCDF Guide to Financial Management, Grants Administration, and Program Accountability

    A "Tribal TANF and CCDF Guide to Financial Management, Grants Administration, and Program Accountability" was developed in conjunction with a special Tribal Cluster Training, "Collaboration and Accountability as Foundations for Success," held in Portland, Oregon on August 24-25, 2004.  This Tribal Cluster Training is jointly sponsored by the Office of Family Assistance (OFA), which administers the Tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, and the Office of Child Care (OCC), which administers the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) program.
  • Minimum Standards for Tribal Child Care: A Health and Safety Guide

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-193) requires that in lieu of any licensing and regulatory requirements applicable under State and local law, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services shall develop minimum child care standards for Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations receiving funds under the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). The law requires that the standards be developed in consultation with Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations and appropriately reflect tribal needs and available resources.
  • Tribes and States Working Together: A Guide to Tribal-State Child Care Coordination

    The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) has made available $4.8 billion to States, Territories, and Tribes in Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 2004. This program, authorized by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, PL 104-193, assists low-income families, families receiving temporary public assistance, and those transitioning from public assistance in obtaining child care so they can work or attend training/education.
  • Tribal Child Care And Development Fund: Guide for New Administrators

    Tribal Child Care and Development Fund administrators work each day to ensure that the children and families in tribal communities have the child care services that best meet their needs. The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)1, a federal block grant for States, Tribes, and Territories, is a key resource to help increase the availability, affordability, and quality of child care services.
  • Tribal CCDF Guide to Financial Management, Grants Administration, and Program Accountability

    Tribal managers and staff working with Federal grants must be fully knowledgeable of all applicable Federal requirements and skilled in applying these requirements to the daily operation of their programs, whether starting a new program or striving to maintain a quality program which meets the intent of the enacting legislation. It is the responsibility of both the tribal fiscal and program managers to identify the regulations and other requirements that apply to the programs they administer.
  • Child Care Helps America Work and Learn

    Issue One, January 2010 Recovery Act Increases Enrollment and Quality Improvement in ACF Region IV, Tennessee Serves Thousands of Children Through the Recovery Act, Recovery Funding Supports Direct Services to Low-income Families, Florida Uses Recovery Act Funds for Early Learning Initiatives, CCDF Highlights in Region IV Issue Two, March 2010
  • Promoting Local Partnerships Between Child Care and Early Head Start: Ideas for State Leaders

    Across the country, State and Territory leaders are looking for ways to develop the supply of high-quality child care that meets the unique needs of infants and toddlers, especially for those who are at risk. At the same time, State Early Childhood Advisory Councils (ECACs) are charged with identifying opportunities for, and barriers to, collaboration and coordination of early childhood programs. One approach being considered is promoting local partnerships between Federal Early Head Start (EHS) grantees and child care centers and family child care homes.

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