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  • ACF-218 - Annual Quality Progress Report (QPR)

    Published: April 23, 2019
    ACF-218 - Annual Quality Progress Report (QPR)
  • Priorities Report: FY2018

    Published: January 22, 2019
     BACKGROUND  The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) subsidies help low-income families with children under age 13 pay for child care. As a block grant, CCDF gives funding to states, territories, and tribes to provide child care subsidies through vouchers or certificates to low-income families, and grants and contracts with providers in some states. CCDF provides access to child care services for low-income families so parents can work, attend school, or enroll in training. Additionally, CCDF promotes the healthy development of children by improving the quality of early learning and afterschool experiences for both subsidized and unsubsidized children. Within the federal regulations, states, territories, and tribes decide how to administer their subsidy programs. States determine payment rates for child care providers, copayment amounts for families, specific eligibility requirements, and have some flexibilities on how to prioritize CCDF services. 
  • Priorities Report: FY2017

    Published: December 26, 2017
    The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) is the primary federal funding source dedicated to providing child care assistance to low-income families.  As a block grant, CCDF gives funding to states, territories, and tribes to provide child care subsidies through vouchers or certificates to low-income families, and grants and contracts with providers in some states.  CCDF provides access to child care services for low-income families so parents can work, attend school, or enroll in training.  Additionally, CCDF promotes the healthy development of children by improving the quality of early learning and afterschool experiences.  In November 2014, Congress acted on a bipartisan basis to pass the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 (Public Law (Pub.L.) 113-186) into law and reauthorized the CCDF program through fiscal year (FY) 2020.  In September 2016, the Office of Child Care (OCC) within the Department of Health and Humans Services’ Administration for Children and Families (ACF) published a CCDF final rule (81 F.R. 67438) to provide clarity to states, territories, and tribes on how to implement the CCDBG Act.
  • Priorities Report

    Published: January 16, 2017
    The Child Care and Development Block Grant Act requires an annual report on whether States use CCDF funding in accordance with provisions related to priority for services. The law requires priority for children of families with very low incomes and children with special needs. CCDF regulations add a priority for services for children who are experiencing homelessness.
  • Priorities Report: FY2016

    Published: January 10, 2017
    The Child Care and Development Block Grant Act requires an annual report on whether States use CCDF funding in accordance with provisions related to priority for services. The law requires priority for children of families with very low incomes and children with special needs. CCDF regulations add a priority for services for children who are experiencing homelessness.
  • State Lead Agency Policies Supportive of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships

    Published: October 19, 2016
    There are currently 275 EHS-CC Partnership (EHS-CCP) grantees, which will serve approximately 32,000 infants and toddlers. The continued development of EHS-CC Partnerships is occurring as states implement new provisions of the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act enacted by the law’s 2014 reauthorization. This most recent reauthorization of the CCDBG Act represents an opportunity for states to enact new policies that align Early Head Start and child care, and support the EHS-CCP goals of improving capacity and quality across programs that serve low-income infants and toddlers and their families in order to enhance child well-being and school readiness outcomes.
  • Initial Findings from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE)

    Published: November 22, 2013
    This research brief describes the Early Care and Education (ECE) workforce data developed in the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE).
  • The Youngest Americans

    Published: November 22, 2013
    This report focuses on infants and toddlers, their parents, communities, and the resources that exist to support them.
  • Quality Performance Report (ACF-118 Appendix 1) for the CCDF Program for the Fiscal Year 2013

    Published: October 22, 2013
    ACF Administration for Children and Families U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Log No: CCDF-ACF-PI-2013-06

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