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Priorities Report: 2020

September 28, 2021

The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) is the primary federal funding source dedicated to providing child care assistance to families with low-incomes.  As a block grant, CCDF gives funding to states, territories, and tribes to provide child care subsidies through vouchers or certificates to families with low incomes, and grants and contracts with providers in some states.  CCDF provides access to child care services for working families with low incomes, so parents can work, attend school, or enroll in training.  Additionally, CCDF promotes the healthy development of children by improving the quality of early learning and school-age experiences for both subsidized and unsubsidized children.  Within the federal regulations, lead agencies administering CCDF decide how to administer the CCDF subsidy programs.  States determine payment rates for child care providers, copayment amounts for families, specific eligibility requirements, and have some flexibilities on how to prioritize CCDF services.

The following reports include the initial CCDF Plan data submitted by states and territories as of July 1, 2021. The preliminary reports and information are subject to change. The Plans are currently under review and will become effective as of October 1, 2021. For more detailed information about the sections listed below, please refer to the CCDF State/Territory Plan Preprint (PDF).

The state-level aggregate report, or ACF-800, is one of two data collections undertaken by the Office of Child Care (OCC) pursuant to the requirements of the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act. The other data collection is accomplished through the ACF-801 Report, which requires detailed, case-level data on families served through the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). All CCDF lead agencies in the States, the District of Columbia, and Territories (including Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Marianna Islands, and the US Virgin Islands) are responsible for completing the ACF-800. For more information, please see the OCC website at: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ/resource/acf-800-annual-aggregate-child-care-data-report.

This issue brief—based on interviews with eight Tribal Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood Home Visiting (Tribal MIECHV) grantees1— focuses on the ways in which home visiting programs can promote the development of early language and literacy skills, which are important aspects of child development. The brief starts with a short overview of early child development to illustrate how language, literacy, and culture are nested within overall development. It reviews why early language and literacy is important and the need for home visiting programs to be intentional in helping families support children’s language and literacy development. The brief shares examples of how Tribal MIECHV grantees are helping families build upon everyday activities from storytelling to singing, talking, reading, and other strategies. It also highlights
how some grantees are tapping into community resources to extend language and literacy offerings.

This summary provides cumulative information obtained from state ACF-696 financial reports submitted for the Grant Year (GY) 2016 CCDF award showing cumulative expenditures through September 30, 2018. The GY 2016 state reports detail expenditures from each of the CCDF funding streams (Mandatory, Matching, and Discretionary), as well as funds transferred from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program to CCDF. Included are expenditures for administration, direct and non-direct services, and congressionally mandated quality activities and activities to improve the quality of care for infants and toddlers.

Priorities Report: 2019

November 26, 2019

BACKGROUND 

The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) program help low-income families with children under the age of 13 pay for child care services. CCDF is a block grant program administered by states, territories, and tribes that provides child care subsidies through vouchers or certificates to low-income families, and grants and contracts with providers in some states. CCDF supports access to child care services for low-income families, so parents can work, attend school, or enroll in training. Additionally, CCDF promotes the healthy development of children by improving the quality of early learning and afterschool experiences for both subsidized and unsubsidized children. Within the federal regulations, state lead agencies decide how to administer the CCDF subsidy programs. States determine payment rates for child care providers, copayment amounts for families, specific eligibility requirements, and have some flexibilities on how to prioritize CCDF services. CCDF administrative data, including monthly case-level data reported on the ACF-801, provides information about the characteristics (including income) of families receiving a child care subsidy. Fiscal year 2017 ACF-801 CCDF administrative data (most recent year available) indicates that approximately 1.32 million children and 796,000 families per month received CCDF child care assistance in fiscal year 2017. The CCDF subsidy program emphasizes parental choice; therefore, children are cared for in a wide variety of settings. Nationally, in fiscal year 2017: (1) 75 percent of children receiving subsidies were cared for in center-based care; (2) 21 percent of children receiving CCDF assistance were cared for in family child care homes; (3) 3 percent of children were cared for in the child’s own home; and (4) the data was not reported or was invalid for the remaining 1 percent. For many parents, affordable child care and school-age care are critical to maintaining stable jobs. According to an analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics employment data, in 2018, at least one parent was employed in 91 percent of families with children under the age of 18, and 72 percent of women with children were working or looking for work1.

1 Table 4. Families with own children: Employment status of parents by age of youngest child and family type, 2017-2018 annual averages. https://www.bls.gov/news.release/famee.t04.htm  

ACF-218 - Annual Quality Progress Report (QPR)

Timeliness of ACF-218 Data Submissions

 

 BACKGROUND 

The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) subsidies help low-income families with children under age 13 pay for child care. As a block grant, CCDF gives funding to states, territories, and tribes to provide child care subsidies through vouchers or certificates to low-income families, and grants and contracts with providers in some states. CCDF provides access to child care services for low-income families so parents can work, attend school, or enroll in training. Additionally, CCDF promotes the healthy development of children by improving the quality of early learning and afterschool experiences for both subsidized and unsubsidized children. Within the federal regulations, states, territories, and tribes decide how to administer their subsidy programs. States determine payment rates for child care providers, copayment amounts for families, specific eligibility requirements, and have some flexibilities on how to prioritize CCDF services. 

CCDF Expenditures Overview for FY 2016 as of 9/30/2016