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This issue brief offers examples of promising strategies implemented by Tribal MIECHV grantees that keep home visiting focused on the curriculum while also empowering families to address their needs.

This issue brief—based on interviews with eight Tribal Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood Home Visiting (Tribal MIECHV) grantees1— focuses on the ways in which home visiting programs can promote the development of early language and literacy skills, which are important aspects of child development. The brief starts with a short overview of early child development to illustrate how language, literacy, and culture are nested within overall development. It reviews why early language and literacy is important and the need for home visiting programs to be intentional in helping families support children’s language and literacy development. The brief shares examples of how Tribal MIECHV grantees are helping families build upon everyday activities from storytelling to singing, talking, reading, and other strategies. It also highlights
how some grantees are tapping into community resources to extend language and literacy offerings.

This document provides guidance for submitting the Needs Assessment (Section 1) and Phase 2 Implementation Plan (Sections 2-8), as well as several Appendices containing supplementary information and resources. HHS will work closely with and provide ongoing technical assistance to grantees as they develop their implementation plans and continuation applications.

This brief—based on interviews with eight Tribal MIECHV grantees—will discuss the importance of cultural enrichments of evidence-based home visiting models; highlight three different approaches Tribal MIECHV grantees have pursued to shape programs to best reflect their communities; and  offer guidance for programs that are searching for a way to best fit home visiting within the cultural context of their communities. The brief discusses ways that grantees have approached cultural enrichment in the first 5 years of the Tribal MIECHV program

This document provides an introduction to the Tribal Home Visiting Program

Description of the ACF grantee Tribes of Siletz Indians.

 

This is a list providing information about COVID-19 for CCDF Lead Agencies

Tribal MIECHV Letter

October 28, 2016

This letter stresses the importance of providing home visiting services to homeless families and their young children within your tribal communities. Ensuring the well-being of our youngest children is essential to the work of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) and our partners at the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and is especially urgent when considering the vulnerability of young AIAN children who experience homelessness or housing instability.

Between 2012 and 2018, the Tribal Home Visiting Program provided 90,298 home visits and conducted an average of 346 visits per week. In 2018 the program served 3,751 parents and children and 63% of home visitors were AIAN.

This brief—based on interviews with eight Tribal MIECHV grantees1 —will (1) discuss the importance of cultural enrichments of evidence-based home visiting models; (2) highlight three different approaches Tribal MIECHV grantees have pursued to shape programs to best reflect their communities; and (3) offer guidance for programs that are searching for a way to best fit home visiting within the cultural context of their communities. The brief discusses ways that grantees have approached cultural enrichment in the first 5 years of the Tribal MIECHV program.