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719 Results for Office of Family Assistance:

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  • HPOG Promising Practice: Central Community College, Employment Strategies

    Published: July 1, 2019
    The healthcare industry in Nebraska offers well-paid positions for skilled applicants. Many people are not qualified for these stable occupations, however, because they face significant barriers to job training. The Central Community College (CCC) Health Education Laddering Program (Project HELP) in Grand Island, NE, works to break down those barriers with the help of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) program.
  • HPOG Promising Practice: Pima Community College, Recruitment – Education, Training, and Support Services

    Published: June 21, 2019
    A crash course in academic preparation helps students at Pima Community College develop Personal Learning Networks that provide sustainable program support both on and off campus. With funding provided by the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) program, Pima Community College’s HPOG HOPES Academy helps students transition into training, creating a bridge that results in a smoother process and increased success.
  • HPOG Success Story: Abbie at Schenectady County Community College

    Published: June 21, 2019
    Abbie was completing the courses needed to apply to the Radiologic Technician program at Schenectady while working grueling hours for little pay. She got into the Radiological Technician program based on her strong academic performance, but then had to choose between furthering her education or caring for her young son. If she stayed in school, she would have to cut her hours as Direct Support Coordinator at a local healthcare facility. The weight of this decision almost threw her off her path. The HPOG program, Upstate Partnership for Healthcare Pathways (UPHP), stepped in to change her life forever. “I suddenly felt relieved. If HPOG could take away some of the financial burdens, that meant it was possible after all.”
  • HPOG Success Story: Ana Karen at San Jacinto Community College

    Published: June 21, 2019
    It didn’t take long for Ana Karen to learn that dreams can’t be ignored. Ana Karen’s family immigrated to the United States from Mexico over two decades ago when she was just a child. As the oldest of seven children, she grew up quickly. After graduating from Pasadena Memorial High School, Ana Karen started working and going to college. She soon had to give up school to help her family with bills at home. She spent four years working as a receptionist at a counseling facility before she could no longer ignore her lifelong dream of becoming a nurse. Ana Karen was accepted into San Jacinto’s Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) program, but the cost was too high even with financial aid. A counselor gave her information on the Health Career Pathways Partnership Grant. She wasted no time making an appointment to complete forms, submit paperwork, and enter the grant lottery. She was excited to learn that almost all education expenses would be covered. Her family repaid her years of help by offering her support and financial assistance. The holistic care at San Jacinto and stable home life enabled her to quit her job and attend the LVN program full time.
  • HPOG Success Story: Antonia at Eastern Connecticut Workforce Investment Board, Inc.

    Published: June 21, 2019
    Every traveler needs a good navigator. Those on the healthcare career path are no different. Antonia’s HPOG success story is about what happens when you find the right navigator on the road to success. Antonia was a single mom in eastern Connecticut struggling to support her young daughter and herself. Her Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) certificate and license were not enough to help her secure the full-time employment she needed. Antonia sought help from a local job center and was directed to a Health Careers Advancement Project’s (HCAP) orientation workshop where she learned about HPOG. At this workshop she met Rachael Martel, the Regional HPOG Navigator who would help her set a new career course. With Rachael’s encouragement, Antonia scheduled a follow-up appointment to discuss her goals, barriers, and how HPOG might be able to help.
  • HPOG Success Story: Claudette at Action for a Better Community, Inc.

    Published: June 21, 2019
    When Claudette was a child, she was caught in a fire and was treated for burns covering over 60% of her body. The treatment she received left her inspired to pursue a career in the healthcare field. Years later, Claudette, now a single mother of seven, was attending her daughter’s childcare intake appointment at Action for a Better Community, when she saw a presentation delivered by an HPOG navigator. She realized that her long-held dream could become reality. In June 2016, she was accepted into the Rochester Health Professions Opportunity Grants (ROC-HPOG), and Claudette met with her appointed navigator to develop an education and career plan. Claudette decided to enroll into the Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) training after taking (and passing) the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) exam.
  • HPOG Success Story: Juanita at Worksystems, Inc.

    Published: June 21, 2019
    Tough people have the ability to outlast hard times. Juanita was facing challenging times when she found out about the Worksystems Inc.’s Health Careers NW program, funded by Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG), in her home of Portland, Oregon. Her curiosity about the program turned into a relationship that fostered a new sense of hope and career opportunities.
  • HPOG Success Story: Kelli at Great Plains Tribal Chairman's Health Board

    Published: June 21, 2019
    Inspiration comes in many forms. For Kelli, it came from her three young children. A single mother, living on a reservation, Kelli worked hard to keep up with her own children during the fast-paced digital age, but she had very little opportunity for education or job training. This put strain on her ability to be a stable role model and provider for her family. She longed for a fulfilling career that provided job security and the opportunity to have dinner with her children without rushing off to the next job. The Yankton Sioux Tribe’s Master Health Director introduced Kelli to the HPOG Pathways to Healthcare Professions (PHP) program. After reaching out by phone and discussing her situation and long-term goals, she decided to apply for Certified Professional Coder (CPC) courses.
  • HPOG Success Story: Mohammed at Volunteers of America Texas

    Published: June 21, 2019
    Mohammed came to the United States at only 12 years old. His parents immigrated to America with the hope of providing a better life for their family. Poverty was a broad challenge in their native India. Even as a child he knew he had bigger dreams than the hurdles he would encounter in his life. The melting pot of Houston, Texas came as a culture shock to Mohammed and his family. It took him two full years to overcome the language barrier. Even though he had problems communicating with his peers due to his strong accent, Mohammed enjoyed reading and language arts, but his favorite subjects were math and science. He was fascinated with the human body and its interworking. Frustrations arose after graduation from high school. Mohammed worried about how he would provide for his family while furthering his education. He made a personal sacrifice, and chose caring for his loved ones over going to school. Fortunately, just as he was thinking of giving up, an HPOG coach from Volunteers of America Texas changed his path. He was working at unsatisfying, minimum wage jobs for the first few years out of high school. He knew he wanted more but needed to work full time to cover the cost of school and take care of his household. The HPOG coach told him the integrated service model could provide the resources and support he needed. The hope of acceptance turned into overwhelming joy for Mohammed and his parents when he was selected to be a part of the HPOG program.
  • HPOG Success Story: Sagal at Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County

    Published: June 21, 2019
    A Seattle mother shapes a new life through her passion for healthcare. February 2013 was a month of change for Sagal, a single mother of two who found herself starting over in Seattle, WA. She arrived in the city with her young children after separating from her husband. Wasting no time, Sagal went to the local TANF office on her second day to meet with a caseworker. She walked out with information that would transform the quality of life for her family forever. At the TANF office, she learned of Health Careers for All (HCA) run by the Workforce Development Council (WDC) of Seattle-King County under the first round of the Health Professions Opportunity Grants (HPOG 1.0). In March 2013, Sagal was accepted to HCA. By April, she joined the nursing cohort at South Seattle College (South), working to complete the courses needed to join the licensed practical nurse (LPN) program. She was quick to adapt to the fast-paced environment, but had concerns about how to balance caring for her children, maintaining a steady income, and schoolwork. She moved off TANF benefits when she found a job as a bilingual medical translator, earing $500 monthly. That job allowed her to work from home and spend more time with her children.

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