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This Year 5 Annual Report describes results for participants in the second round of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program from the beginning of the Program through the end of Year 5 (September 30, 2015 through September 29, 2020). HPOG grants are awarded to organizations that provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income adults for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded a first round of five-year HPOG grants (“HPOG 1.0”) in 2010.

This report describes the first year of the second round of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants Program (“HPOG 2.0”). HPOG 2.0 provides education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for healthcare occupations that pay well and are in high demand. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded this second round of five-year grants in 2015. The first round of five-year grants was awarded in 2010. HPOG 2.0 grants were made to 32 grantees across 21 states, including five tribal organizations. In the first year of the HPOG 2.0 Program, the grantees enrolled over 5,000 participants.

The Year 2 Annual Report describes results for participants in the second round of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants Program (HPOG 2.0) from the beginning of the Program through the end of Year 2 (September 30, 2015 through September 29, 2017). HPOG 2.0 grants are awarded to organizations to provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for healthcare occupations that pay well and are in high demand. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded this second round of five-year grants in 2015. Grants funds are disbursed annually to 32 grantees in 21 states, including five tribal organizations. Through the end of Year 2 of HPOG 2.0, grantees enrolled more than 14,700 participants.

The Year 3 Annual Report describes results for participants in the second round of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants Program (HPOG 2.0) from the beginning of the Program through the end of Year 3 (September 30, 2015 through September 29, 2018). HPOG 2.0 grants are awarded to organizations to provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for healthcare occupations that pay well and are in high demand. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded this second round of five-year grants in 2015. Grants funds are disbursed annually to 32 grantees in 21 states, including five tribal organizations. Through the end of Year 3 of HPOG 2.0, grantees enrolled more than 23,215 participants.

This Year 4 Annual Report describes results for participants in the second round of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program from the beginning of the Program through the end of Year 4 (September 30, 2015 through September 29, 2019). HPOG grants are awarded to organizations that provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded a first round of five-year HPOG grants (“HPOG 1.0”) in 2010.

The funding announcement for the 2020-2025 Tribal TANF-Child Welfare demonstration grant program.

Tribal TANF Caseload Data for Fiscal Year 2017

Tribal TANF Plan guidance provides instructions to tribes and consortia interested in starting a Tribal TANF program.

As a consequence of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the United States is experiencing a nationwide emergency, implicating both public health and the economy. Secretary Azar declared a nationwide public health emergency on January 31, 2020, and President Trump declared a national emergency on March 13, 2020.

The Office of Family Assistance (OFA) has heard from several grantees expressing concerns about the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic for the Tribal TANF program and is fielding many questions about how Tribal TANF can help support people affected by it. Its top priority is the public health and safety of all those operating its programs and receiving its services. Increased need in many tribal nations for basic assistance and other financial benefits may arise as a result of the pandemic. With that in mind, this program instruction (PI) builds on TANF-ACF-PI-2020-01 (Questions and answers about TANF and the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic), found at /ofa/resource/tanf-acf-pi-2020-01, which addressed questions and answers about how state and tribal grantees might use TANF to help those in need and TANF’s administrative flexibilities for both states and tribes. This program instruction addresses frequently asked questions about the flexibilities available to tribes and the requirements for providing non-recurrent, short-term (NRST) benefits to those in need as a result of COVID-19.

This page features a map showing where TTCW programs are located.  A reader may click on a highlighted state to which which programs are located within that state.  Additionally, a reader may select  states with TTCW programs a from a dropdown menu.