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The Year 3 Annual Report describes results for participants in the second round of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants Program (HPOG 2.0) from the beginning of the Program through the end of Year 3 (September 30, 2015 through September 29, 2018). HPOG 2.0 grants are awarded to organizations to provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for healthcare occupations that pay well and are in high demand. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded this second round of five-year grants in 2015. Grants funds are disbursed annually to 32 grantees in 21 states, including five tribal organizations. Through the end of Year 3 of HPOG 2.0, grantees enrolled more than 23,215 participants.

This brief provides an overview of the Blackfeet Community College (BCC) Tribal HPOG program, key findings to date, and stories from students who have benefitted from the program. Findings focus on program structures, program processes, and program outcomes, and are based on qualitative data from interviews with administrative and program implementation staff, focus groups with the BCC students, and phone interviews with program completers and non-completers, as well as administrative data. It is part of a series of briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB).

This brief provides an overview of the Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) Tribal HPOG program, key findings to date, and stories from students who have benefitted from the program. Findings focus on program structures, program processes, and program outcomes, and is based on qualitative data from interviews with administrative and program implementation staff, focus groups with the CITC students, and phone interviews with program completers and non-completers, as well as administrative data. It is part of a series of briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB).

This brief provides an overview of the College of Menominee Nation (CMN) Tribal HPOG program, key findings to date, and stories from students who have participated in the program. The CMN Tribal HPOG program offers a Nursing Career Ladder to allow students to progress from the Pre-Nursing Assistant level through to the Registered Nurse level. Based on qualitative data from interviews with administrative and program implementation staff, focus groups with students, phone interviews with program completers and non-completers, as well as administrative data, findings focus on program structures, processes, and outcomes.

This Year 5 Annual Report describes results for participants in the second round of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program from the beginning of the Program through the end of Year 5 (September 30, 2015 through September 29, 2020). HPOG grants are awarded to organizations that provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income adults for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded a first round of five-year HPOG grants (“HPOG 1.0”) in 2010.

The Year 2 Annual Report describes results for participants in the second round of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants Program (HPOG 2.0) from the beginning of the Program through the end of Year 2 (September 30, 2015 through September 29, 2017). HPOG 2.0 grants are awarded to organizations to provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for healthcare occupations that pay well and are in high demand. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded this second round of five-year grants in 2015. Grants funds are disbursed annually to 32 grantees in 21 states, including five tribal organizations. Through the end of Year 2 of HPOG 2.0, grantees enrolled more than 14,700 participants.

This Year 4 Annual Report describes results for participants in the second round of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program from the beginning of the Program through the end of Year 4 (September 30, 2015 through September 29, 2019). HPOG grants are awarded to organizations that provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded a first round of five-year HPOG grants (“HPOG 1.0”) in 2010.

This brief provides an overview of the strategies that Tribal HPOG grantees have used to implement the HPOG program, challenges encountered during implementation, lessons learned, and ongoing program evolution and adaptation to address unique tribal cultural and programmatic needs.

The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Impact Study will answer questions about the program’s overall effectiveness and explore how variations in services affect program impacts. This analysis plan provides detailed information on the study’s impact analyses, including data sources that will be used, how variables and measures will be operationalized, how missing data will be treated, the approach to hypothesis testing, and model specifications for each of the study’s research questions. This document supplements information outlined in the HPOG Impact Study Design Report released in November 2014.

An Introduction to the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) and Evaluation