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An Introduction to the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) and Evaluation

The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) were first awarded in 2010 to 32 grantee organizations across 23 states.  The grantees, which include post-secondary education institutions, Workforce Investment Boards, state and local government agencies, community-based organizations, Indian tribes and tribal organizations, will receive funding through September 2015.  In June 2015, HPOG delivered the HPOG Program and Evaluation Portfolio Interim Report to Congress. The report provides a summary of the significant activities, outcomes and accomplishments of the HPOG program during its first three fiscal years, from 2010 to 2013. The information contained in the report was gathered from an analysis of participant performance, an outcome study of a sub-set of participants and an evaluation of the tribal grantees.  The report also outlines key aspects of the HPOG program, such as its career pathways framework, fundamental program components, employment outcomes and ongoing evaluation and research initiatives.

This report presents key findings from the evaluation of the first round of the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program. These findings show that all five of the Tribal HPOG grantees established programs that led to healthcare training completion and employment.

The report includes findings on programs’ structures, processes, and outcomes, and insights related to these findings. The evaluation team worked to conduct a culturally responsive evaluation by receiving input from partners, advisors, and grantees throughout the evaluation.

This brief provides an overview of the Blackfeet Community College (BCC) Tribal HPOG program, key findings to date, and stories from students who have benefitted from the program. Findings focus on program structures, program processes, and program outcomes, and are based on qualitative data from interviews with administrative and program implementation staff, focus groups with the BCC students, and phone interviews with program completers and non-completers, as well as administrative data. It is part of a series of briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB).

This brief provides an overview of the Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) Tribal HPOG program, key findings to date, and stories from students who have benefitted from the program. Findings focus on program structures, program processes, and program outcomes, and is based on qualitative data from interviews with administrative and program implementation staff, focus groups with the CITC students, and phone interviews with program completers and non-completers, as well as administrative data. It is part of a series of briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB).

This brief provides an overview of the College of Menominee Nation (CMN) Tribal HPOG program, key findings to date, and stories from students who have participated in the program. The CMN Tribal HPOG program offers a Nursing Career Ladder to allow students to progress from the Pre-Nursing Assistant level through to the Registered Nurse level. Based on qualitative data from interviews with administrative and program implementation staff, focus groups with students, phone interviews with program completers and non-completers, as well as administrative data, findings focus on program structures, processes, and outcomes.

The Year 3 Annual Report describes results for participants in the second round of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants Program (HPOG 2.0) from the beginning of the Program through the end of Year 3 (September 30, 2015 through September 29, 2018). HPOG 2.0 grants are awarded to organizations to provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for healthcare occupations that pay well and are in high demand. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded this second round of five-year grants in 2015. Grants funds are disbursed annually to 32 grantees in 21 states, including five tribal organizations. Through the end of Year 3 of HPOG 2.0, grantees enrolled more than 23,215 participants.

This brief discusses the academic and social supportive services that students in the Tribal HPOG program are receiving to support their participation, retention and advancement in their trainings. It provides an overview of Tribal HPOG and the supportive services offered; how supportive services meet students’ needs; and promising approaches in delivering supportive services. The brief is part of a series of briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB).

This Interim Report provides an overview of the tribal HPOG grantees’ progress over the first two years of the program with initial evaluation findings organized around program structure, program processes, and education and employment outcomes.

This report describes the research design of the HPOG Impact Study. The study is designed to answer questions about overall HPOG program effectiveness and explore how variations in program services affect program impacts, including identifying which elements of career pathways programs contribute most to advancing the labor market success of participants.