Career Pathways Intermediate Outcomes (CPIO) Study

2014-2021

The Career Pathways Intermediate Outcomes (CPIO) Study is rigorously evaluating the intermediate impact of career pathways programs first studied in the federally-sponsored Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Impact Study and Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Project. CPIO will use administrative data and survey responses to examine intermediate impacts on educational progress, labor market outcomes, and family well-being approximately three years after participants were randomly assigned into either a treatment group that could access the career pathways program or to a control group that could not. Long-term program impacts will be assessed at approximately six years after enrollment into the study through the Career Pathways Long-term Outcomes (CPLO) Study.

Key evaluation questions that will be addressed in these studies include:

  • What are the intermediate effects of the PACE and HPOG programs on their populations of interest?
  • How do effects of career pathways programs vary over time, across outcomes or domains, by occupational sector, by program model, and by participant characteristics?
  • How can career pathways models be adjusted to promote longer-term outcomes for participants?

The project has released analysis plans for the PACE and HPOG Impact follow-up studies, which supplement earlier published analysis plans and provide more information about how the intermediate impact analyses will be conducted. Reports for each of the nine PACE programs and the HPOG Impact Study will be released on a rolling basis beginning in late 2019 and continuing into 2021. The study will also conduct cost benefit analyses for selected PACE programs.

This work is being conducted by Abt Associates and its partners MEF Associates and The Urban Institute.

Points of contact: Nicole Constance and Amelia Popham.

This study has registered the following impact evaluations on the Open Science Framework:

Information collections related to this project were reviewed and approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs under OMB #0970-0394 (HPOG 1.0) and #0970-0397 (PACE). Related materials are available at the HPOG 1.0 Visit disclaimer page and PACE Visit disclaimer page Information collection pages on RegInfo.gov.

The most currently approved documents are accessible by clicking on the ICR Ref. No. with the most recent conclusion date. To access the information collections (E.g. interviews, surveys, protocols), click on View Information Collection (IC) List. Click on View Supporting Statement and Other Documents to access other supplementary documents.

Data from the earlier follow-up points of the HPOG Impact Study and PACE project are archived through the Child and Family Data Archive under the titles Health Profession Opportunity Grants Evaluation Visit disclaimer page and Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education Evaluation Visit disclaimer page .

 

Related Resources

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