Preventing and Addressing Intimate Violence when Engaging Dads (PAIVED), 2017 - 2020

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a widespread problem in the United States and among the vulnerable populations served by Administration for Children and Families programs. However, little is known about IPV experienced and perpetrated by fathers served by the Office of Family Assistance’s Responsible Fatherhood (RF) grantees or about how RF programs address IPV in practice.

The purpose of the Preventing Intimate Violence when Engaging Dads (PAIVED) project was to outline approaches that RF programs could take to address and contribute to the prevention of IPV among fathers.

The project:

  • Synthesized information about the prevalence of IPV among fathers
  • Consulted with practitioner and research experts in the fatherhood and related fields to identify unique challenges and considerations around addressing IPV in RF programs
  • Examined approaches that RF programs are currently taking to address fathers’ experiences with or perpetration of IPV
  • Examined existing curricula and other materials that RF programs use or could use to understand what information is include related to IPV
  • Identified gaps in currently used approaches and materials, discussed implications for RF programs, and outlined approaches that RF programs could take to address and contribute to the prevention of IPV among fathers.

The project team is from Child Trends with subcontracts to Boston Medical Center and Futures Without Violence.

Point(s) of contact: Samantha Illangasekare and Kriti Jain.

Information collections related to this project have been reviewed and approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs under OMB # 0970-0516 (expired 9/30/2019). Related materials are available at the PAIVED Information Collection page on RegInfo.gov Visit disclaimer page .

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