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  • ACF OPRE News Vol. 7 Issue 2 - February 7, 2019 (New)

    Published: February 7, 2019
    Featured items in this issue...
  • Targeting Higher Skills and Healthcare Jobs: How HPOG Grantees Set and Use Performance Goals (New)

    Published: February 7, 2019
    In 2015, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the second round of Health Profession Opportunity Grants (“HPOG 2.0”) to 32 grantees in 21 states, including five tribal organizations. The purpose of the...
  • Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Impact Study’s Three-Year Follow-Up Analysis Plan

    Published: January 22, 2019
    In 2010, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the first round of five-year grants for the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG 1.0) Program to 32 organizations in 23 states, including five tribal organizations. The purpose of the HPOG Program...
  • Findings from In-Depth Interviews with Participants in Subsidized Employment Programs

    Published: January 11, 2019
    Subsidized employment and transitional jobs programs seek to increase employment and earnings among individuals who have not been able to find employment on their own. First-hand accounts of participants’ experiences in these programs can inform efforts to improve long-term employment outcomes for various “hard-to-employ” populations. This study is part of two federally funded multisite projects — the Department of Labor’s Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration (ETJD) and the Department of Health and Human Services’ Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration (STED) — testing various subsidized employment models. These programs targeted a variety of disadvantaged populations, including welfare recipients, people returning to the community from prison, and low-income parents who do not have custody of their children (“noncustodial” parents, usually fathers) and who owe child support. The projects tested programs that enhanced the subsidized job model with case management and other support services, job-readiness training, and job search assistance intended to help participants move into unsubsidized employment.
  • ACF OPRE News Vol. 7 Issue 1 - January 4, 2019

    Published: January 4, 2019
    Featured items in this issue...
  • OPRE 2018 in Review

    Published: December 31, 2018
    Some highlights of our work from 2018 include...
  • ACF OPRE News Vol. 6 Issue 23 - December 20, 2018

    Published: December 20, 2018
    Featured items in this issue...
  • Organizational Culture in TANF Offices: A Review of the Literature

    Published: December 20, 2018
    The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program is designed to help needy families achieve self-sufficiency by providing cash assistance and promoting job preparation, work, marriage, and two-parent families. States receive block grants from the federal government to design and operate TANF cash assistance programs in addition to other benefits and services that promote these goals.
  • Using The Science About Self-Regulation To Improve Economic Outcomes For TANF Families

    Published: December 13, 2018
    Administrators and staff of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs are continually looking for new strategies to help their participants achieve economic independence. Many TANF employment programs focus on rapid job placement...
  • The Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration: New Perspectives on Creating Jobs – Final Impacts of the Next Generation of Subsidized Employment Programs

    Published: December 11, 2018
    This report presents the final impacts from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration (ETJD), which included two sites that are part of ACF’s Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration (STED). ETJD tested seven transitional jobs programs that targeted people recently released from prison or unemployed parents who did not have custody of their children. The ETJD programs were “enhanced” in various ways to address the shortcomings of previous programs. Two of the ETJD grantees which served non-custodial parents, Atlanta and San Francisco, were evaluated as part of the STED study. The two evaluations – STED and ETJD – closely coordinated beyond the shared sites, including shared reports, common data collection instruments, and other ongoing collaboration.

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