Start a New Search

image Visit coronavirus.govVisit disclaimer page for the latest Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) updates.
View ACF COVID-19 Responses and Resources
The page you are looking for may now be in the ACF Archives.

1920 Results for Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation:

Page:

  • Findings from the National Descriptive Study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships: Partnering to Improve the Quality of Infant-Toddler Care (New)

    Published: July 9, 2020
    Prior research suggests that partnerships in early care and education have the potential to enhance the quality of care and offer comprehensive services to more children and families. This brief draws on data from the national descriptive study of Early Head Start-Child Care (EHS-CC) Partnerships to describe the activities partnerships engage in to improve the quality of services for infants, toddlers, and their families.
  • Findings from the National Descriptive Study of Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships: Providing Comprehensive Services to Infants and Toddlers and Their Families (New)

    Published: July 9, 2020
    When combined with high quality early care and education, comprehensive services are intended to support families in their role as caregivers and foster the health and well-being of children. Connecting children and families to these services is a foundational feature of the Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) models. Partnerships between EHS and other early care and education settings hold promise for expanding access to comprehensive services for infants, toddlers, and their families...
  • Pathways-to-Outcomes: How Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education Program Activities May Lead to Intended Outcomes (New)

    Published: July 8, 2020
    Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education (HMRE) programs for low-income participants are funded by the Office of Family Assistance (OFA) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). Trained facilitators deliver curricula, typically in weekly interactive classes, using lectures and in-class practice with partners or small groups. According to the current literature, HMRE programs may improve participants’...
  • Pathways-To-Outcomes: How Responsible Fatherhood Program Activities May Lead To Intended Outcomes (New)

    Published: July 8, 2020
    The report presents four “Pathways-to-Outcomes” models for Responsible Fatherhood (RF) programs, each focusing on one outcome domain measured in the Parents and Children Together (PACT) evaluation: (1) healthy relationships between co-parents, (2) father development and well-being, (3) consistent employment; and (4) parenting skills and father involvement. ACF directed Mathematica to create this set of RF Pathways-to-Outcomes models to depict how RF program activities may contribute to...
  • Early Care and Education in Rural Communities (New)

    Published: July 6, 2020
    Much like the 7.8 million families with young children in urban areas, many of the 1.1 million families with young children in rural areas need and use early care and education (ECE). Families across the United States face challenges accessing child care, and challenges often vary by population density. Although the definition of what constitutes an urban, suburban, and rural area differs across studies, the literature suggests that...
  • The 2015 Cohort of Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Grantees: Interim Report on Grantee Programs and Clients (New)

    Published: July 2, 2020
    Healthy families help children thrive, but many families experience instability and parental absence. Since 2005, Congress has funded $150 million each year in healthy marriage (HM) and responsible fatherhood (RF) grants to support the long-term success of children and families. The Office of Family Assistance (OFA) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, has awarded...
  • Employment and Training Programs Serving Low-Income Populations: Next Steps for Research

    Published: June 25, 2020
    The Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, has a long history of supporting rigorous research and evaluation on the broad range of human services programs that fall under ACF’s auspices. Many of ACF’s programs have components aimed at supporting employment among low-income populations, and, consequently, OPRE regularly supports...
  • ACF OPRE News Vol. 8 Issue 12 – June 18, 2020

    ACF OPRE News: What Does Research Tell Us About the Benefits of Delayed Sexual Activity for Adolescents? Featured items in this issue: Assessing the Benefits of Delayed Sexual Activity: A Synthesis of the Literature Supporting Program Progress: Performance Measures, Data System, and Technical Assistance for the 2020 Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Grantees Empowering Families: Implementation of an integrated HMRE, employment, and financial literacy program for low-income couples
  • Supporting Program Progress: Performance Measures, Data System, and Technical Assistance for the 2020 Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Grantees

    Published: June 12, 2020
    Since 2006, the Office of Family Assistance (OFA), within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, has awarded and overseen federal funding for three cohorts of healthy marriage (HM) and responsible fatherhood (RF) grant programs (2006–2011, 2011–2015, and 2015–2020). HM grantees promote HM and relationships through eight legislatively authorized activities, such as marriage and relationship education...
  • Assessing the Benefits of Delayed Sexual Activity: A Synthesis of the Literature

    Published: June 11, 2020
    For several decades, the federal government has supported programs that encourage adolescents to wait to have sex. This support stems in part from the evidence and expectations that delaying sexual activity can have important benefits for adolescents and society as a whole. The most direct of these benefits are reductions in teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, research has also found benefits of delayed sexual activity extending beyond these physical outcomes...

Page: