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The American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2015 (AI/AN FACES 2015) is the first national descriptive study of children and families enrolled in Head Start programs operated by federally recognized tribes. These programs are known as Region XI. Region XI programs incorporate their unique history, community traditions, and beliefs into their operations and integrate language and culture into the delivery of services to children and families.

Home visiting services geared toward pregnant women and families with young children offer an opportunity to intervene and support mothers at risk for intimate partner violence (IPV). In theory, effective services might reduce the incidence of IPV and thereby reduce the likelihood that children witness family violence. However, we know very little about the effectiveness of home visiting in reducing IPV outcomes.

The legislation authorizing the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program requires the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to conduct a continuous program of research and evaluation activities to build knowledge around the implementation and effectiveness of home visiting programs.

The Tribal Home Visiting Program, part of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV), is a federally funded initiative that supports the provision of home visiting services to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) families and children. The program, also known as Tribal MIECHV, is overseen by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in collaboration with the Health Resources and Services Administration and was authorized...

The American-Indian Alaska Native Head Start Family and Children Experiences Survey (AI/AN FACES 2015) was planned over two years, with advice from members of a work group comprised of Region XI Head Start Directors, ACF partners, University-based tribal early childhood researchers, and the study research organization. In the Fall of 2015 and Spring of 2016, data were collected from children, families, and Head Start Programs. Using data from AI/AN FACES 2015, this research brief...

In 1997, the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) was launched to provide descriptive, nationally representative information on the characteristics, experiences, and development of Head Start children and families, and the characteristics of the Head Start programs and staff who serve them. Until 2015, FACES only included children, families, and programs in Head Start Regions I-X...

Early childhood home visiting programs support pregnant women and families with young children so they can be healthy, safe, and better prepared to reach their goals. The success of these programs is dependent upon recruiting and retaining a skilled, committed, and satisfied workforce. This brief summarizes findings from the Home Visiting Career Trajectories study—a national study of the home visiting workforce—on workplace factors in recruiting and retaining qualified staff.

Until recently, limited research has been available on home visiting staff or on the professional development system that supports them. In 2016, the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation in the Administration for Children and Families, in collaboration with the Health Resources and Services Administration, contracted with the Urban Institute to study the home visiting workforce in MIECHV-funded local implementing agencies (LIAs) to gather needed information...

Home visiting aims to support expectant parents and families with young children by offering them “resources and skills to raise children who are physically, socially, and emotionally healthy and ready to learn” (HRSA, 2019). Although the characteristics of the families served, and the service components delivered, vary by evidence-based home visiting model, problematic substance use is commonly one of the many outcome areas addressed by home visitors in the course of their engagement...

The American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2015 (AI/AN FACES 2015) is the first national descriptive study of children and families enrolled in Head Start programs operated by federally recognized tribes. These programs incorporate communities’ unique histories, traditions, and beliefs into their operations. AI/AN FACES 2015 reflects advice from the AI/AN FACES Workgroup, comprising Region XI Head Start directors, researchers, and federal officials.