Resource Library

Please apply a keyword search or select a search facet on the left to narrow search results.

Displaying 1 - 10 of 60

The data analyzed for this spotlight is from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, Second Cohort (NSCAW II), a nationally representative sample of children involved with the child welfare system (CWS). It allows for the identification of children with developmental delays and compromised cognitive or academic functioning.

Recent federal, state, and local policies and initiatives focus on increasing access to high-quality ECE for all families. Given the prevalence and potential importance of these initiatives for families and children, it is useful for the field to take stock of how access to ECE is conceptualized and measured and to understand the extent to which context, purposes, and available indicators shape the assessment of access.

The American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2015 (AI/AN FACES 2015) is the first national descriptive study of children and families enrolled in Head Start programs operated by federally recognized tribes. These programs are known as Region XI. Region XI programs incorporate their unique history, community traditions, and beliefs into their operations and integrate language and culture into the delivery of services to children and families.

Updates on behavioral economics and the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project.

The American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2015 (AI/AN FACES 2015) is the first national descriptive study of children and families enrolled in Head Start programs operated by federally recognized tribes. These programs incorporate communities’ unique histories, traditions, and beliefs into their operations. AI/AN FACES 2015 reflects advice from the AI/AN FACES Workgroup, comprising Region XI Head Start directors, researchers, and federal officials.

If a child’s parents both work full-time and together earn $30,000 per year, can the family receive a subsidy to help pay for child care? What if one of the parents loses their job and needs child care while they look for a new job? If the family does qualify for a subsidy, how much will they have to pay out of pocket? The answers to these questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances...

Updates on behavioral economics and the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project.

Updates on behavioral economics and the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project.

Updates on behavioral economics and the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project.

ACF OPRE News Vol. 5 Issue 19 - November 9, 2017

The Latest from the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) 2.0 Evaluation
November 9, 2017

Featured items in this issue: ...