Resource Library

Please apply a keyword search or select a search facet on the left to narrow search results.

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

This snapshot presents nationally representative data on why parents search for care for their young children and the reasons for not enrolling with a new provider after such a search.

This resource guide provides information for researchers about administrative data collected on federal policies and programs that (in whole or part) support young children with disabilities.

This Snapshot uses data from the 2012 National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to examine caregiving arrangements for young children with special needs to better understand where these children receive early care and education (ECE) services. Findings in this Snapshot are focused on children under age 6 and ECE providers serving children under age 6.

This report explores preliminary associations between indicators of the quality of care and the prices for care reported by providers in the United States for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers.

These resources present a national portrait of the demographic diversity of center-based and home-based ECE teachers and caregivers from the 2012 National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE), and include examinations of the professional characteristics of each subgroup, as well as the concordance between teacher and caregiver demographic characteristics and the characteristics of the children and communities they serve.

The paper provides basic background information about the structure of child care costs and revenues and shows how the pandemic and associated changes in regulations and demand have affected them. The paper also describes implementation issues for allocating financial resources to child care programs and offers considerations related to implementation (e.g., considerations related to determining program eligibility for grants, selection criteria for grants, and calculation of award amounts).

The intent of the Snapshot is to examine the types of nonparental care lower-income households, with at least one working parent, use to care for children under age 6. The Snapshot examines the types of nonparental care families use, both solely and in combination, to care for infants and toddlers (0-35 months) and 3- to-5-year-olds (not yet in Kindergarten).