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This evaluation brief defines measures of home visiting services called process indicators, describes how process indicators link to short- and long-term outcomes in home visiting evaluations, and provides an example illustrating the role of process indicators in evaluations.

This brief defines propensity score matching and other matching methods, covers steps in the matching process, offers suggestions for decreasing bias, presents a hypothetical example of matching in the home visiting context, and recommends resources to support high-quality matching.

This brief describes the capacity-building approach of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), which helps Tribal Home Visiting grantees strengthen their data systems through TA from the Tribal Home Visiting Evaluation Institute (TEI). 

RCE may help Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) awardees test program changes quickly and rigorously. The purpose of this brief is to introduce MIECHV awardees to RCE and its potential use in their programs.

Qualitative research, which explores how or why something occurs, can contribute new knowledge to the understanding of home visiting. While qualitative research is sometimes viewed as a less rigorous add-on to quantitative research, studies utilizing qualitative research methods—whether part of a mixed-methods or as a standalone approach—can be rigorously designed to provide reliable and trustworthy information.

This work is part of the Design Options for Home Visiting Evaluation (DOHVE) project, led by OPRE in collaboration with HRSA. ACF has partnered with JBA to conduct the DOHVE project.

There is growing emphasis placed on evidence-based interventions, and opportunities to make programmatic decisions based on evidence reflect progress in promoting positive outcomes. However, some populations (e.g., ethnic and cultural minority communities, marginalized groups) may be left behind in efforts to build evidence, if they are more difficult to study. Over time, as evidence builds for the populations...