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Hotlines for victims and survivors of domestic violence and/or dating violence (DV) are an important source of information and support for individuals seeking intervention and preventative care services. However, evaluation of these programs is nascent. The National Domestic Violence Hotline (The Hotline) and loveisrespect (LIR; the help line targeted towards young people) provide information and assistance to adult and youth victims/survivors of DV...

This report describes efforts to develop a survivor-centered theoretical framework. It also explains the processes used to develop, test, and refine a set of theoretically based performance measures for program assessment of the National Domestic Violence Hotline (The Hotline®) and presents results of a program assessment using data from The Hotline.

The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program, administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) in collaboration with the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), supports voluntary, evidence-based home visiting services for at-risk pregnant women and parents with young children up to kindergarten entry. In February 2018, the MIECHV Program was allocated $400 million per year through fiscal year (FY) 2022 through...

This brief summarizes findings from a random assignment impact study of Wise Guys, a long-standing, widely implemented curriculum designed to help adolescent males make responsible decisions about their sexual behavior. Nationwide, boys report higher rates of sexual risk behaviors than girls do. In addition, becoming a father as a teenager is associated with completing fewer years of schooling and being less likely to graduate from high school...

This brief provides information to help fatherhood practitioners better understand what referrals are appropriate for participants who have used or survived domestic violence (DV). It provides background information to help distinguish between the key features of DV agencies, battering intervention programs (BIPs), and anger management programs...

Healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) programs for couples with children aim to strengthen couples’ relationships and ultimately improve the well-being of participants’ children. Although these programs have shown some success in improving outcomes for married couples, their success with unmarried couples has been limited.

Until recently, limited research has been available on home visiting staff or on the professional development system that supports them. In 2016, the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation in the Administration for Children and Families, in collaboration with the Health Resources and Services Administration, contracted with the Urban Institute to study the home visiting workforce in MIECHV-funded local implementing agencies (LIAs) to gather needed information...

This report is the fourth and final in a series on Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress; it is targeted specifically towards program administrators and practitioners.  This report reviews the key concepts for understanding self-regulation, including the relationship between stress and self-regulation. Additionally, it summarizes principal findings from a comprehensive review of self-regulation interventions.  Finally and most importantly, it addresses how current theory...

Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education (HMRE) programs for low-income participants are funded by the Office of Family Assistance (OFA) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). Trained facilitators deliver curricula, typically in weekly interactive classes, using lectures and in-class practice with partners or small groups. According to the current literature, HMRE programs may improve participants’...

Healthy relationship programming can play an important role in preventing and responding to intimate partner violence (IPV). Healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) initiatives, funded by the Office of Family Assistance (OFA) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, present an opportunity for reaching adults who are experiencing IPV and connecting them with help.