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The American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2015 (AI/AN FACES 2015) is the first national descriptive study of children and families enrolled in Head Start programs operated by federally recognized tribes. These programs are known as Region XI. Region XI programs incorporate their unique history, community traditions, and beliefs into their operations and integrate language and culture into the delivery of services to children and families.

The legislation authorizing the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program requires the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to conduct a continuous program of research and evaluation activities to build knowledge around the implementation and effectiveness of home visiting programs.

As states and territories make decisions about child care policies, they may find it useful to collect data from child care providers. Survey data can be helpful for answering questions about providers’ characteristics and experiences. Yet surveys can be difficult to design. This brief discusses best practices for developing and testing surveys.

A one-page tip sheet lists suggestions for writing strong survey questions. 

Since 2005, Congress has funded $150 million each year in healthy marriage (HM) and responsible fatherhood (RF) grants designed to improve the well-being of children and families. The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has awarded and overseen three cohorts of these grants (2006–2011, 2011–2015, and 2015–2020)....

Social service organizations and policy makers increasingly recognize that they can accomplish more and improve outcomes for those they serve when they work together with other organizations. They forge new partnerships, develop new relationships, and often implement changes to practice as a result of collaboration and coordination efforts.

Collaboration and coordination efforts occur along a continuum, from early planning stages towards more fully developed or mature levels of partnership...

The Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, has a long history of supporting rigorous research and evaluation on the broad range of human services programs that fall under ACF’s auspices. Many of ACF’s programs have components aimed at supporting employment among low-income populations, and, consequently, OPRE regularly supports...

For several decades, the federal government has supported programs that encourage adolescents to wait to have sex. This support stems in part from the evidence and expectations that delaying sexual activity can have important benefits for adolescents and society as a whole. The most direct of these benefits are reductions in teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, research has also found benefits of delayed sexual activity extending beyond these physical outcomes...

This webinar is designed to support CCDF Lead Agency staff and partners in understanding how stakeholder perspectives can be paired with agency data to help answer more policy questions. Learn how the perspectives of the people experiencing or implementing the policies can increase understanding of problems, possible solutions, and community contexts...

This brief summarizes findings from a random assignment impact study of Wise Guys, a long-standing, widely implemented curriculum designed to help adolescent males make responsible decisions about their sexual behavior. Nationwide, boys report higher rates of sexual risk behaviors than girls do. In addition, becoming a father as a teenager is associated with completing fewer years of schooling and being less likely to graduate from high school...

This tip sheet shares lessons learned by the Building Bridges and Bonds (B3) study thus far so that other programs can consider implementing these approaches to encourage father engagement.