A Portrait of Head Start Classrooms and Programs in Spring 2015: FACES 2014-2015 Data Tables and Study Design

February 15, 2018
Topics:
Early Head Start, Head Start
Projects:
Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), 1997-2022 | Learn more about this project
Types:
Reports
A Portrait of Head Start Classrooms and Programs in Spring 2015: FACES 2014-2015 Data Tables and Study Design Cover
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  • Pages 142
  • Published 2018

Introduction

This report includes key information on the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2014-2018 (FACES 2014) study design and a set of data tables that present descriptive statistics for the characteristics of classrooms, teachers, centers, and programs serving Head Start children and families in spring 2015. Data are drawn from the spring 2015 round of FACES 2014.

Purpose

The purpose of this report is two-fold: (1) to provide information about the FACES study, including the background, design, methodology, measures, and analytic methods, and (2) to report detailed descriptive statistics and related standard errors in a series of tables on the programs, their staff, and classrooms. The data provide descriptive information from classroom observations and staff surveys about Head Start’s efforts to help children and families meet their goals and local efforts to meet the Head Start Program Performance Standards.

Key Findings and Highlights

The data tables provide descriptive information on Head Start classrooms, teachers, centers, and programs.

For classrooms and teachers, the tables show:

  • the quality of Head Start classrooms
  • curricula and assessment tools used in the classrooms
  • teachers’ classroom practices
  • mentoring and training received by teachers
  • teachers’ background characteristics, depressive symptoms, attitudes, and job satisfaction

For centers and programs, the tables show:

  • structural characteristics of Head Start programs (such as enrollment, auspice[1], sources of revenue) and centers (staffing and turnover)
  • center and program director background characteristics
  • areas directors would like more support
  • training and technical assistance efforts in programs (including professional development offered to staff)
  • factors considered when selecting curricula and assessments
  • whether a parent support curriculum is used
  • elements of programs’ data systems

The tables provide this information for all Head Start programs. For some of these characteristics, the tables also provide the information by agency type (community action agency, school system, other) and program size (child enrollment).

Examples of key findings related to classrooms and teachers include the following:

  • On the Instructional Support domain of the CLASS, classrooms score 2.4 on average which falls in the low range based on developer cut points (scores of 1 or 2 on the 1 to 7 scale). On the Emotional Support domain of the CLASS, classrooms score 5.5 on average, which is in the mid range (scores of 3, 4, or 5). On the Classroom Organization domain of the CLASS, classrooms score 4.8 on average, which is in the mid range (scores of 3, 4, or 5).
  • Most lead teachers (74.2 percent) report having a mentor, most commonly an education coordinator or specialist (65.9 percent of those with a mentor).
  • Nearly three-quarters of lead teachers (72.6 percent) have a Bachelor’s degree or higher.

Examples of key findings related to centers and programs include the following:

  • Nearly all program directors (97.5 percent) and more than three-quarters of center directors (80.9 percent) have a Bachelor’s degree or higher.
  • On average, centers employ four lead teachers. The average lead teacher turnover in centers was 17.1 percent in the 12 months before spring 2015.
  • Nearly all Head Start programs (98.5 percent) store their data in an electronic database.
 

[1] Program auspice subgroups include community action agencies, school systems, and all other agency types including private or public non-profits (non-community action agency [CAA]), private or public for-profits, and government agencies (non-CAA).

Methods

The FACES sample provides information at the national level about Head Start programs, centers, classrooms, and the children and families they serve. We selected a sample of Head Start programs from the 2012-2013 Head Start Program Information Report, with two centers per program and two classrooms per center selected for participation. One-hundred seventy-six programs, 346 centers, and 667 classrooms participated in the study in spring 2015.

The statistics found in these tables are estimates of key characteristics of Head Start teachers, classrooms, centers, and programs in spring 2015. Teacher data on teacher characteristics are weighted to represent all teachers in Head Start. Teacher data that describe Head Start classrooms and classroom observation data are weighted to represent all Head Start classrooms. Director survey data are weighted to represent all Head Start programs or centers.

Citation

E. Moiduddin, C. Bush, M. Manley, N. Aikens, L. Tarullo, L. Malone, and S. Lukashanets. (2017). A Portrait of Head Start Classrooms and Programs in Spring 2015: FACES 2014-2015 Data Tables and Study Design. OPRE Report 2017-101. Washington, DC: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Glossary

FACES
Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey
Last Reviewed: February 13, 2018