Domestic Victims of Human Trafficking Demonstration Projects: Service Models of the Second Cohort of Projects

January 23, 2019
Topics:
Youth Services
Projects:
Evaluation of Domestic Victims of Human Trafficking Demonstration Projects, 2014-2018 | Learn more about this project
Types:
Reports
Domestic Victims of Human Trafficking Demonstration Projects: Service Models of the Second Cohort of Projects Cover
Download report (pdf)
  • File Size 769kb
  • Pages 11
  • Published 2019

Introduction

This brief describes the service models of the second cohort of projects that implemented 2-year demonstration projects for domestic victims of human trafficking from October 2015 through September 2017 in Billings, Montana; North Dakota and Clay County, Minnesota; and Multnomah County, Oregon. Each project’s organization background; demonstration project structure, including key partners and roles; and victim service model are described.

Domestic human trafficking involves forced labor and sexual exploitation of United States citizens and lawful permanent residents including men and women; and children, youth, and adults. To improve services for domestic victims of human trafficking, the Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, awarded three cooperative agreements in 2014 to implement demonstration projects. FYSB awarded three additional cooperative agreements in 2015. The intent of the demonstration program was to build, expand, and sustain organizational and community capacity to deliver trauma-informed, culturally relevant services for domestic victims of human trafficking through a coordinated system of agency services and partnerships with community-based organizations and allied professionals.

The information presented in the brief was gathered as part of the Evaluation of Domestic Victims of Human Trafficking Demonstration Projects. The evaluation is overseen by ACF’s Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE), in collaboration with FYSB, and conducted by RTI International.

Primary Research Questions

  1. 1 How did projects foster partnerships, enhance community capacity to identify and respond to domestic trafficking survivors, and provide coordinated case management and comprehensive victim services?
  2. 2 What were the characteristics and experiences of trafficking survivors served by the projects and to what extent did survivors served make progress toward outcomes?
  3. 3 What were the costs of key program components?

Purpose

ACF’s DVHT demonstration program is intended to enhance organizational and community capacity to identify domestic victims of human trafficking and deliver comprehensive, victim-centered case management and services. FYSB selected organizations for the DVHT demonstration program that were part of broad service provider coalitions and served populations vulnerable to trafficking, but that historically had not provided tailored services for domestic victims of human trafficking or that had only recently begun to identify trafficking victims and provide some specialized services to meet their needs. This approach allowed FYSB to examine if and how organizations that had not traditionally served domestic trafficking victims could build capacity to serve this population.

The purposes of the DVHT cross-site evaluation are to inform ACF’s efforts to improve services for domestic trafficking survivors, enhance performance measurement, and guide future evaluation. The evaluation of the second cohort of DVHT demonstration projects was designed to detect projects’ practice strategies for:

  • building and expanding organizational and community capacity to identify and serve domestic trafficking victims;
  • identifying and engaging domestic trafficking victims in service delivery;
  • providing case management;
  • coordinating comprehensive services across the range of needed providers; and
  • ailoring services to individuals who have experienced domestic trafficking.

t

Key Findings and Highlights

  • The second cohort of domestic human trafficking demonstration projects all carried out activities to meet the objectives of the cooperative agreement, including assessing community needs and building service capacity with providers, developing and strengthening comprehensive victim-centered service models, addressing housing needs of victims, fostering and expanding community partnerships, developing networks to expand victims’ access to services, and promoting culturally appropriate trauma-informed services.
  • The demonstration projects offer three unique examples of how organizations collaborated with community partners to identify, engage, and serve domestic victims of human trafficking. Lead organizations’ diverse backgrounds, community contexts, target populations, and partnerships resulted in the implementation of distinct project approaches to service delivery.

Methods

The evaluation used a mixed-methods approach that included qualitative and quantitative components. Data presented in this brief were collected through interviews conducted in person during site visits and by telephone with project staff, clients, and key partners from each of the three projects, and a review of project materials and documents (e.g., grant progress reports). Additional evaluation data sources indirectly informed the projects’ service model descriptions, including cost questionnaires and information on clients served, services provided, and clients’ progress toward proximal outcomes reported by each project.

Citation

Krieger, K., Feinberg, R., Gremminger, M., Hardison Walters, J., & Misra, S. (2018). Domestic Victims of Human Trafficking Demonstration Projects: Service models of the first cohort of grantees. OPRE 2018-103. Washington, DC: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Glossary

DVHT
domestic victims of human trafficking
FYSB
Family and Youth Services Bureau
OPRE
Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation
Last Reviewed: January 18, 2019