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Home and Community Native Language and Cultural Experiences Among AI/AN Children in Region XI Head Start: Findings from the American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2015

January 8, 2020
Topics:
Child Care, Early Head Start, Head Start, Home Visiting
Projects:
American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (AI/AN FACES) | Learn more about this project
Types:
Reports
Cover of "Findings From the American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2015"
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  • File Size 1mb
  • Pages 15
  • Published 2020

Introduction

Research shows that Native culture and language support children’s development in positive ways. In this brief, we examine the Native language and cultural experiences of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children in Head Start programs operated by federally recognized tribes or tribal consortia (Region XI). The data presented in this report inform our understanding of the Native language and cultural experiences that AI/AN children in Region XI Head Start have at home and in their communities.

Research Questions

  1. 1 What Native language experiences did AI/AN children in Region XI Head Start have at home and in their community?
  2. 2 What Native cultural experiences did AI/AN children in Region XI Head Start have at home and in their community?

Purpose

The purpose of this brief is to describe the Native language and cultural experiences of AI/AN children in Region XI Head Start. The findings provide insight on areas such as AI/AN children’s Native language learning, AI/AN children’s community cultural activity participation, and parents’ cultural connections and beliefs.

Key Findings and Highlights

  • The majority of AI/AN children in Region XI Head Start were in homes where English was the primary language.
  • The majority of AI/AN children in Region XI Head Start in homes where some Native language was spoken as well as those in homes where English only was spoken had parents who reported that it was somewhat or very important for their child to learn a Native language.
  • The majority of AI/AN children in Region XI Head Start participated in at least one AI/AN cultural activity in the community in the last month according to their parents’ report.
  • The majority of AI/AN children in Region XI Head Start had parents who reported a variety of tribal or cultural beliefs and practices.

Methods

The AI/AN FACES 2015 sample provides nationally representative information about Region XI Head Start children, their families, programs, centers, and classrooms. We selected a sample of Region XI Head Start programs from the 2012–2013 Head Start Program Information Report, with one to two centers per program and two to four classrooms per center. Within each classroom, we selected all children for the study. In total, 21 programs, 36 centers, 73 classrooms, and 1,049 children participated in the study.

The sample used for this brief includes information reported by the parent or family member who completed the fall and spring surveys for the 708 AI/AN children participating in the study.  All findings are weighted to represent the children enrolled in Region XI Head Start programs in fall 2015.

Citation

Barnes-Najor, J., Sarche, M., Abramson-Martin, L., Amaya-Thompson, J., Cameron, A., Charles, T., Godfrey, A., Kaufman, C., Petticrew, E., Richardson, M., Suave, M., Shuey, D., Whitaker, J. (2019). Home and Community Tribal Language and Cultural Experiences among AI/AN Children in Region XI Head Start: Findings from the American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2015. OPRE Report #2019-87 Washington, DC: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Glossary

AI/AN FACES 2015
American Indian and Alaska Native Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey 2015
Last Reviewed: February 19, 2020