Immediate Outcomes of Contacting the National Domestic Violence Hotline and loveisrespect

December 14, 2017
Topics:
Youth Services
Projects:
Accomplishments of the Domestic Violence Hotline, Online Connections, and Text (ADVHOCaT), 2014-2018 | Learn more about this project
Types:
Reports
Immediate Outcomes of Contacting the National Domestic Violence Hotline and loveisrespect
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  • File Size 595kb
  • Pages 3
  • Published 2017

Introduction

The National Domestic Violence Hotline (The Hotline) and loveisrespect (LIR; the helpline targeted toward young people) offer services to connect with a staff person via three methods: telephone, online chat, and text. Through these modes, advocates at The Hotline and LIR provide crisis intervention and emotional support; information about national, state, and community resources; and direct connections to local providers. The Hotline and LIR also maintain informational websites.

Purpose

This snapshot summarizes results from a survey of those who contacted The Hotline and LIR by telephone or online chat, or who viewed the websites. The purpose of the survey was to assess contactors’ outcomes immediately after they received The Hotline or LIR services and resources.

Key Findings and Highlights

  • When asked how helpful they found The Hotline and LIR services, callers reported a higher mean helpfulness score than online chatters or website visitors.
  • When asked how much their contact with The Hotline and LIR provided ways to plan for safety, callers reported a higher mean safety planning score than online chatters or website visitors.
  • When asked how much their awareness of community resources increased as a result of contacting The Hotline and LIR, callers reported a higher mean awareness score than online chatters or website visitors.
  • When asked how much their knowledge about abusive and healthy relationships increased as a result of contacting The Hotline and LIR services, callers reported a higher mean knowledge score than online chatters or website visitors.
  • When asked how much they thought the person they spoke to cared about their situation, callers reported a higher mean score than online chatters.
  • When asked whether they felt the same, better, or worse after interacting with The Hotline or LIR, a higher percentage of callers reported feeling better than chatters (89% vs 77%, respectively).

Methods

Those who contacted The Hotline or LIR by telephone between March 7, 2016 and April 30, 2016, were not directly connected to a resource or service provider, and called at a time when a staff manager was on duty were asked to participate in the survey. Callers who agreed were transferred to a staff manager, who administered the survey by phone. Those who contacted The Hotline or LIR by online chat between February 15, 2016 and April 30, 2016 were asked to voluntarily complete the survey immediately after ending their chat conversation with an advocate. Those who accessed The Hotline or LIR websites between February 15, 2016 and May 12, 2016 could voluntarily click on a link to complete the survey. The survey for website visitors included an additional question asking about the purpose of their website visit and did not include the questions on emotional support and emotional wellbeing.

Citation

McDonnell, K.A., Nagaraj, N.C., Bingenheimer, J.B., Mead, K.H., Wood, S.F. (2017). “Immediate Outcomes of Contacting The Hotline and LIR: Accomplishments of the Domestic Violence Hotline, Online Connections and Text.” Prepared for the Administration for Children & Families, U.S., Department of Health and Human Services.

Glossary

The Hotline
The National Domestic Violence Hotline
LIR
loveisrespect (the helpline targeted towards young people)
Contactors
Those who contact The Hotline and LIR and connect with advocates to receive services by telephone, online chat, or text messaging.
Advocates
The Hotline and LIR staff who answer calls, chats, and texts.
Last Reviewed: December 11, 2017