Home Visiting

OPRE manages research and evaluation activities related to the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program. The MIECHV program is administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration, in collaboration with the Administration for Children and Families. Major research and evaluation projects include the Multi-Site Implementation Evaluation of Tribal Home Visiting (MUSE), the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) project, and the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE).

Featured Resources

Projects on this Topic

The American Indian and Alaska Native Early Childhood Needs Assessment Project (AI/AN EC Needs Assessment) seeks to lay the foundation for understanding the need for early childhood services in American Indian and Alaska Native communities.  The project outlines a series of designs for future studies that will inform a national assessment of the unmet need for early childhood care, education, and home visiting services (prenatal to age 5) in tribal communities...

The goal of the Assessment and Mapping of Community Connections in Home Visiting (AMC-HV) project was to identify and apply innovative methods to better understand the community-level systems and networks...

The Design Options for Home Visiting Evaluation (DOHVE 2) project provided technical assistance related to data, research, and evaluation to Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program awardees. A few selected DOHVE products are included below. To access all DOHVE TA resources, please see: http://www.jbassoc.com/reports-publications/dohve Visit disclaimer page Visit disclaimer page.

The Design Options for Home Visiting Evaluation (DOHVE) project supports the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program and includes two key components...

The Home Visiting: Approaches to Father Engagement and Fathers' Experiences Study is a qualitative project that will collect information about innovative approaches used by existing home visiting programs to actively...

The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation-Strong Start (MIHOPE-Strong Start) was launched in 2012 to evaluate the effectiveness of evidence-based home visiting for improving prenatal and birth outcomes and reducing health care...

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) launched the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) review in 2009 to conduct a thorough and transparent systematic review of the home visiting research literature. HomVEE provides an assessment of the evidence of effectiveness for home visiting models that target families with pregnant women and children from birth to kindergarten entry (through age 5).

The Child and Family Data Archive (CFData) is the place to discover, access, and analyze data on young children, their families and communities, and the programs that serve them. OPRE funds numerous data collection efforts through research studies on a wide range of early care and education (ECE) topics within and across child care, Head Start, and home visiting.

The purpose of this project is to increase understanding of how families are selected to receive home visiting services through the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV)...

The goal of the Home Visiting Career Trajectories project is to examine the state of home visiting careers to understand how people enter the field, the perceived and actual pathways for professional advancement and tenure, and reasons for field attrition. This work aims to address the paucity of data on the home visiting workforce that can be used to learn how to best recruit and retain high quality staff.

Though significant evaluative work has been carried out to improve understanding of how human services programs meet their goals of improving family economic self-sufficiency, financial security, and overall wellbeing, there are gaps in knowledge of how programs can best serve rural communities. Rural contexts present unique opportunities and challenges for administering human services programs, and the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) seeks to better understand these contexts through several programs, including the following...

The MIHOPE Check-In project maintained up-to-date contact information for families participating in the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE) between the first follow-up when the children were approximately 15 months old and the second follow-up when the children were in kindergarten. In addition, MIHOPE Check-In administered brief surveys to gather information on a small set of family and child outcomes when the children were approximately 2.5 and 3.5 years old...

The Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE) is the legislatively mandated evaluation of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV)...

The purpose of the MIHOPE Long-Term Follow-Up project (MIHOPE-LT) is to design and conduct a follow-up study of participants in the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE) to examine the long-term effects of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting program (MIECHV) on children and families.

MIHOPE has examined child and family outcomes for participants in MIECHV-funded programs when the children...

The Multi-Site Implementation Evaluation of Tribal Home Visiting (MUSE) is the first multi-site, multi-model study of how home visiting is implemented across tribal communities. The study aims to develop in-depth understandings of the characteristics of tribal home visiting programs and the families they serve.

The Network of infant/toddler Researchers (NitR) consortium brings together leading applied researchers with policymakers and technical assistance providers responsible for overseeing and supporting early childhood programs serving families during pregnancy and the first three years of life.

In 2013, OPRE commissioned four interrelated reports on self-regulation and toxic stress from a team at the Center for Child and Social Policy at Duke University. That team and other experts have since created multiple practice-oriented resources grounded in the initial reports. Together, these reports and resources comprise the ’Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress Series.’ 

The goal of the Touchpoints for Addressing Substance Use Issues in Home Visiting project is to generate knowledge about how home visiting programs, including those funded through HRSA’s and ACF's Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program, engage and support families around prevention, treatment, and recovery from substance use issues. The project will identify evidence-informed practices for working with families, supporting frontline staff, and building collaborations with referral sources.

The Tribal Early Childhood Research Center (TRC) seeks to address gaps in early childhood research with American Indian and Alaska Natives through partnerships with tribal Head Start, Early Head Start, child care, and home visiting programs. The goals of the research are:

The Tribal Home Visiting Evaluation Institute provides technical assistance that promotes rigorous and relevant performance measurement, data management, continuous quality improvement, and evaluation activities in the Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program.The project contributes to knowledge building around home visiting as a service delivery strategy in tribal communities through reliable, responsive products that build data and evaluation capacity...