< Back to Search

Annual ORR Reports to Congress - 2005: Priority Area 1: Preferred Communities

Published: May 6, 2014

Priority Area 1: Preferred Communities

In Priority Area 1, ORR seeks to promote opportunities for refugee self-sufficiency and effective resettlement. To that end, funds are made available for grants to voluntary agencies to increase placements of newly arriving refugees in preferred communities where there is a history of low welfare utilization and a favorable earned income potential relative to the cost of living.

In FY 2005, ORR awarded continuation grants, totaling $2,540,568 to national voluntary agencies to enhance entry level services in preferred communities with good employment opportunities needed by newly arriving refugees.

  • Church World Service and Refugee Program, $250,000, Preferred Community Sites: New Windsor, Maryland; Decatur, Georgia; Knoxville, Tennessee; and Houston, Texas
  • Domestic Foreign and Missionary Society, $200,000, Preferred Community Sites: Indianapolis, Indiana; South Bend, Indiana; Austin, Texas; Trenton, New Jersey; and New Haven, Connecticut
  • Ethiopian Community Development Council, Inc., $462,000, Preferred Community Sites: San Diego, California; Denver, Colorado; and Houston, Texas
  • International Rescue Committee, $168,880, Preferred Community Site: Abilene, Texas
  • Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, $300,000, Preferred Community Sites: Tampa, Florida; Utica, New York; Sacramento, California; Greensboro/Hickory, North Carolina; Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Milwaukee/Wausau, Wisconsin
  • United States Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, $400,000, Preferred Community Sites: Akron, Ohio; Binghamton, New York; Bridgeport, Connecticut; Buffalo, New York; Colchester, Vermont; and Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, $759,688, Preferred Community Sites: Buffalo, New York; Dallas, Texas; Galveston/Houston, Texas; Hartford, Connecticut; Indianapolis, Indiana; Rochester, New York; Salt Lake City, Utah; San Antonio, Texas; and San Diego, California

In FY 2005, ORR awarded continuation grants, totaling $2,259,290 to nine national voluntary agencies to provide services to the Somali Bantu.

  • Church World Service, $150,000
  • Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, $159,290
     
  • Ethiopian Community Development Council, Inc., $200,000
  • Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, $100,000
  • International Rescue Committee, $270,000
  • Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, $280,000
  • United States Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, $300,000
  • United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, $650,000
  • World Relief, $150,000

In the February 2005 closing of the Standing Announcement for Services to Recently Arrived Refugees, the following grants were awarded in the amount of $1,802,795:

  • Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, $190,628, Preferred Community Sites: New Haven, Connecticut; Atlanta, Georgia; Syracuse, New York; and Knoxville, Tennessee.
  • Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, $198,943, Preferred Community Sites: Boise, Idaho; Chicago, Illinois; Louisville and Lexington, Kentucky; and Houston, Texas.
  • Ethiopian Community Development Council, Inc., $325,000, Preferred Community Sites: Phoenix, Arizona and Las Vegas, Nevada.
  • Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, $320,000, Preferred Community Sites: Springfield, Massachusetts; Tucson, Arizona; Charlotte and Greensboro, North Carolina; and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
  • International Rescue Committee, $170,891, Preferred Community Site: Boise, Idaho.
  • United States Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, $278,324, community wide.
  • United States Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, $319,009, community wide.

Priority Area 2: Unanticipated Arrivals

The Unanticipated Arrivals Program is intended to provide resources that bridge the gap between the arrival of refugees and the time when their numbers are included in the population-based formula social service funds. Situations that Unanticipated Arrivals funds are intended to alleviate include those where bilingual staff are needed for new arrivals, where refugee services do not exist, and where available services are not sufficient to meet the needs of the additional refugees.

In the October 8, 2004 closing of the Standing Announcement for Services to Recently Arrived Refugees, ORR awarded twenty-five grants totaling $4,127,243 to the following applicants:

  • ADVOCAP, Inc., Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, $210,000
  • Alliance for Multicultural Community Services, Houston, Texas, $154,000
  • Catholic Family Center, Div. of Catholic Charities Rochester, New York, $150,000
  • Catholic Social Services, Anchorage, Alaska, $150,000
  • Community Refugee and Immigration Services, Columbus, Ohio, $150,000
  • East African Community of Orange County, Anaheim, California, $153,130
  • Eau Claire County, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, $150,000
  • Fresno Interdenominational Refugee Ministries, Fresno, California, $203,275
  • Hmong American Partnership, Saint Paul, Minnesota, $150,000
  • Immigration and Refugee Community Organization, Portland, Oregon, $115,000
  • International Institute of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, $150,000
  • International Rescue Committee, Phoenix, Arizona, $180,000
  • International Rescue Committee, San Francisco, California, $210,000
  • Lao Family Community of Minnesota, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota, $161,364
  • Lao Family Community of Minnesota, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota, $100,000
  • Lao Family Community of Stockton, Inc., Stockton, California, $206,012
  • Lutheran Social Services of Michigan, Detroit, Michigan, $150,000
  • Mental Health Center of Dane County, Inc., Madison, Wisconsin, $115,000
  • Nationalities Service Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, $110,000
  • Neighborhood House, Saint Paul, Minnesota, $150,000
  • North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, North Carolina, $209,462
  • Opening Doors, Sacramento, California, $150,000
  • Saint Paul Public Schools, Saint Paul, Minnesota, $150,000
  • Southeast Asian Community Council, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, $150,000
  • Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development, Madison, Wisconsin, $350,000

In the February 28, 2005 closing of the Standing Announcement for Services to Recently Arrived Refugees, ORR awarded twenty-two grants totaling $4,499,926 to the following applicants:

  • Baltimore Public Schools, Baltimore, Maryland, $171,206
  • Catholic Charities of the Diocese of La Crosse, Inc., La Crosse, Wisconsin, $130,000
  • Catholic Charities of Tennessee, Inc., Nashville, Tennessee, $167,349
  • Catholic Family Services, Inc., Amarillo, Texas, $205,132
  • Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, Illinois, $204,058
  • Eau Claire County, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, $100,000
  • Fresno Center for New Americans, Fresno, California, $203,225
  • Fresno County Economic Opportunities Commission, Fresno, California, $210,000
  • Hmong American Partnership, Saint Paul, Minnesota, $110,000
  • Hmong Cultural Center of Butte, County, Oroville, California, $116,735
  • Hmong Women’s Heritage Association, Sacramento, California, $190,000
  • Little Havana Activities & Nutrition Centers of Dade County, Miami, Florida, $209,417
     
  • Minnesota Council of Churches, Minneapolis, Minnesota, $120,000
  • Neighborhood House, Saint Paul, Minnesota, $240,000
  • Office of Refugees and Immigrants, Boston, Massachusetts, $210,000
  • Puget Sound OIC, Inc., Seattle, Washington, $210,000
  • Sacramento Lao Family Community, Sacramento, California, $130,000
  • Southern Sudan Community Association, Omaha, Nebraska, $180,000
  • State of Wisconsin, Department of Workforce Development, Madison, Wisconsin, $500,000
  • United States Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, Burlington, Vermont, $210,000
  • Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Madison, Wisconsin, $500,000
  • Wisconsin United Coalition of Mutual Assistance Association, Madison, Wisconsin, $182,804

Priority Area 3: Ethnic Community Self Help Program

ORR supported 10 multi-site and 36 local ethnic organizational projects with awards totaling $8,011,363. These organizations provided various in-house and referral refugee services, organized self-help networks, and developed newsletters and web sites to enhance ethnic community organizing and interaction. In addition, they conducted community outreach, coalition building, self-assessment, strategic planning, resource development and leadership training activities.

Multi-Site Projects

  • Free Iraq Foundation, Washington, D.C., $115,000
     
  • Ethiopian Community Development Council, Virginia, $165,000
     
  • Kurdish Human Rights Watch, Virginia, $270,000
  • Somali Family Care Network, Virginia, $271,792
  • Ethiopian Community Development Council, Virginia, $300,000
  • National Alliance of Vietnamese-American Service Agency, Maryland, $368,280
  • Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, New York, $176,700
  • Free Iraq Foundation, Washington, D. C. , $261,026
  • Immigrant and Refugee Community Organ-ization, Oregon, $287,502
  • Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, New York, $243,036

Local Projects

  • Albanian American Women’s Organization , New York, $236,870
  • International Rescue Committee, Utah, $81,574
  • National Coalition for Haitian Rights, New York, $100,000
  • Haiti an Americ an Foundation , Florida, $120,000
  • East African Community of Orange County, California, $189,441
  • International Rescue Committee, Washington, $147,945
  • Office for Refugees and Immigrants, Massachusetts, $245,000
  • San Diego Police Department, California, $102,158
  • Alliance for Multicutural Community Services, Texas, $154,549
  • Somali Community Center of Nashville, Tennessee, $211,700
  • Jewish Family and Children’s Services, California, $153,998
  • Church of the Beatitudes, Arizona, $225,000
  • InterChurch Refugee and Immigr ant Ministries, Illinois, $238,693
  • Lincoln Interfaith Council, Nebraska, $100,000
  • Southern Sud an Community Association, Nebraska, $264,685
  • Boat People S.O.S., Inc., Virginia, $178,974
  • Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services, Michig an, $100,000
  • Rainbow Community Org anization, Inc., Indi ana, $50,000
  • New York Association for New Americans, Inc., New York, $225,000
  • Sudanese American International Corporation, Colorado, $117,558
  • Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization, Oregon, $105,775
  • Eastern European Service Agency, California, $149,395
  • Lutheran Community Services Northwest, Washington, $244,499
  • Ukraini an Community Center of Washington, Washington, $129,840
  • Cambodi an Mutual assist ance Association, Inc., Massachsetts, $149,600
  • Bosnian American Association of New York, New York, $140,116
  • Horn of Africa Community in North America, California, $189,967
  • African Credit Education and Financial Counseling Agency, Minnesota, $96,640
  • Opening Doors, Inc., California, $125,000
  • Vietnamese-American Civic Association, Massachusetts, $149,999
  • Somali Mai Community of Minnesota, Minnesota, $100,000
  • Somali Association of Arizona, Arizona, $219,062
  • Luther an Family Services in Carolinas, North Carolina, $124,002
  • The Montagnard Hum an Rights Org anization, North Carolina, $184,000
  • Lao Family Community of Fresno, Inc., California, $157,014
  • Ansob Center for Refugees, Inc., New York, $45,000

Refugee Family Enrichment

ORR is committed to promoting policies and programs that help strengthen the strong, positive family relationships that refugees have brought with them to the United States. The Refugee Family Enrichment Program helps provide opportunities for refugees to strengthen their marriages and families. These projects are divided into two groups: (1) programs for marriage education and (2) programs for the youth and elderly.

Refugee couples face unique difficulties because of their flight from persecution and long periods of insecurity and ORR funds marriage education in order to help refugees cope with these difficulties. This group of grantees provides marriage education workshops to refugee couples in order to enhance and promote healthy relationships by providing the skills, tools, knowledge and support necessary to create and sustain healthy marriages. Refugee elderly and youth have also experienced persecution and face hardships while resettling that pose unique challenges to their families, communities and the agencies that seek to serve them. This group of grantees operates projects to aid the elderly in accessing appropriate services and that work with youth to promote healthy development.

Since the inception of the program, 20,612 refugees have attended family courses or workshops:

Grantee  FY 2004  FY 2005 Total

Boat People

680

633

1,313

ECDC

406

452

858

HIAS

3,062

3,975

7,037

KHRW

469

559

1,028

Lao Family

645

817

1,462

LIRS

311

391

702

Orange County

306

558

864

USCCB

3,349

3,264

6,613

Wisconsin

631

104

735

       

Marriage Education

  • United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, $1,000,000
  • Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Inc., $300,000
  • Kurdish Human Rights Watch, Inc., $200,000
  • Ethiopian Community Development Council, $200,000
  • Lao Family Community Development, $200,000
  • Boat People SOS, $200,000
  • Orange County Social Services Agency, $200,000
  • Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, $199,941

Youth and Elderly

  • Horn of Africa Service, $50,000
  • International Rescue Committee, $50,000
  • Mohawk Valley Resource Center for Refugees, $50,000
  • Pacific Asian Empowerment Program, $50,000
  • Southern Sudan Community Association, $49,931
  • CEDARS Youth Services, $50,000
  • Immigration and Refugee Services of America, $50,000
  • East Side Neighborhood Services, $50,000
  • Wausau School District , $50,000
  • Community Teamwork, $50,000
  • Oklahoma Institute for Child Advocacy, $50,000
  • Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization, $50,000
  • The Cambodian Family, $50,000
  • Vietnamese Social Services of Minnesota, $50,000
  • Southern Minnesota Regional Legal Services, $50,000
  • Refugee Family Services, $50,000
  • Shorefront YM-YWHA of Brighton Manhattan Beach, $50,000
  • International Service Center , $50,000
  • Jewish Board of Family and Children Services, $50,000
  • Asian American LEAD, $50,000
  • Community Relations - Social Development Commission, $50,000
  • Hmong-American Partnership Fox Valley, $50,000
  • Utah Peace Institute, $50,000
  • City of Lincoln, Nebraska, $50,000
  • Jewish Family and Children's Services of Minneapolis, $49,985
  • Young Women’s Christian Association of Tulsa, $49,987
  • Bethany Christian Services, $50,000
  • Indochinese Cultural and Service Center, $50,000

Refugee Health Initiatives

ORR provided continuation funding to 37 states, awarding grants totaling $4,796,000. Through this program, ORR promotes outreach and access for newly arrived refugees to provide medical screenings. Health assessments help to identify health conditions that may be a threat to public health and that may be an impediment to refugees achieving self sufficiency.

In some areas, interpretation, follow-up treatment, and informational services were also provided through the preventive health funds. State Refugee Coordinators reported a total of 65,410 medical health screenings completed in FY 2005.

Technical Assistance: Refugee Mental Health

Technical assistance for mental health activities for refugees is available to U.S. resettlement communities under an inter-agency agreement with the Refugee Mental Health Program at the Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Department of Health and Human Services. Under this agreement, two mental health professionals provide technical assistance and consultation for communities on the mental/behavioral health and well-being of refugee populations. Other activities include presentations at refugee-related conferences, facilitation of collaboration among refugee service providers and public and private mental health providers, organizations and systems, and response to emergencies of refugee admissions and other unique refugee-related assignments from the Office of the Director, ORR.

Technical Assistance: Refugee Health

Under a second agreement, the Office of Humanitarian and Refugee Health of the Office of Global Health Affairs (OGHA), Department of Health and Human Services provides technical assistance in organizing, conducting and financing medical screenings and health assessments, refugee preventive health activities, data management activities surrounding refugee health, medical interpretation, and available prevention and promotion materials in refugee languages. The Office also provides health information on new refugee populations, staff trainings, caring for refugees with HIV and other special medical needs, and providing and promoting better communication with voluntary agencies, State health coordinators and mutual assistance associations.

ORR Refugee Health Team

Through the ORR inter-agency agreements with both SAMHSA and OGHA, ORR has formed a Refugee Health Team to address the broad health and mental health needs of refugees in a seamless, holistic manner. Examples of several health prevention and response activities are listed below:

  • OGHA and SAMHSA technical assistance to ORR in the development of a pandemic planning response.
  • The development and implementation of the Points of Wellness: Partnering for Refugee Health and Well-Being initiative. This initiative is designed to help develop and implement health/mental health promotion and disease prevention activities and programs within refugee communities. The Initiative includes a toolkit, website, a refugee health listserv and SAMHSA & OGHA technical assistance and training for Mutual Assistance Associations and other refugee provider partners.
  • A collaborative effort with the OGHA and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to test and treat post-arrival Somali refugees for an outbreak of measles, which occurred in the Eastleigh suburb of Nairobi, Kenya.
  • A collaborative effort with the OGHA, CDC, Mercy Housing, Inc. and the Spring Institute to create a health awareness campaign on lead poisoning for refugees and refugee case workers.
  • A multi-agency effort that includes CDC to treat Hmong and other refugees who were resettled in the U.S. with undetected tuberculosis, as well to educate the broader Hmong community for disease prevention.
  • A multi-agency effort that includes CDC to enhance both overseas and domestic health screenings for refugees. The HHS group is working in concert with Department of State (PRM) to draft an agreement to implement HHS recommendations for all enhancements.
  • Technical assistance on all programmatic aspects of the ORR Torture Treatment Program.
  • Cuba n/Haitian

In FY 2005, ORR awarded $19 million for service programs for Cuban Haitian refugees and entrants. Eight grants were made ranging from $100,000 to $17 million. Service for each grantee include one or more of the following program categories: employment; health and mental health; refugee crime and victimization and adult/vocational education.

The following States received grants under this program:

  • Ariz ona Dept. of Economic Security $250,000
  • Florida Dept. of Children and Families $17,665,000
  • Massa chusetts Office of Refugee and Immigrants $100,000
  • Mich igan Family Independence Agency $100,000
  • North Carolina Dept. of Health and Human Services $100,000
  • New Jersey Dept. of Human Services $500,000
  • Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada $185,000
  • Georgia Dept. of Human Resources $100,000

Education Grants

In FY 2005, ORR awarded 35 new grants totaling $12,000,000 to the State Governments to assist local school systems inundated with refugee children. These grants provide support for supplementary instruction to refugee students, fostering parent/school partnership and assistance to teachers and other school staff in improving their understanding of refugee children and their families. The following States received grants under this program:

  • State of New Hampshire $100,000

  • Lutheran Social Services of SD $145,000

  • New York State Office of Temporary & Disability $1,000,000

  • Florida Department of Education $1,900,000

  • Oregon Department of Education $250,000

  • Illinois Department of Human Services $400,000

  • Mountain States Group, Inc. $110,000

  • Maine Dept. of Health and Human Services $110,000

  • Mass. Office for Refugees and Immigrants $230,000

  • Michigan Dept. of Human Services $350,000

  • State of Connecticut $150,000

  • New Mexico Human Services Dept. $100,000

  • North Carolina Dept. of Health and Human Services $175,000

  • California Dept. of Social Services $1,360,000

  • Ohio Dept. of Job and Family Services $180,000

  • Nebraska Dept of health and Human Services $100,000

  • Minnesota Dept of Human Services $825,000

  • Catholic Charities of Kentucky $200,000

  • State of Utah $175,000

  • Indiana Family and Social Services Administration $100,000

  • State of Vermont $100,000

  • Arizona Dept. of Economic Security $400,000

  • North Dakota Dept of Human Services $110,000

  • New Jersey J Division of Family Development $110,000

  • Iowa Dept. of Human Services $110,000

  • Commonwealth of Pennsylvania$300,000

  • State of Washington $925,000

  • State of Nevada $110,000

  • Virginia Dept of Social Services $180,000

  • Texas Health and Human Services Commission $720,000

  • Colorado Dept of Human Services$110,000

  • Wisconsin Dept of Public Instruction $110,000

  • Georgia Department of Human Resources $400,000

  • Department of Social Services of Missouri $255,000

  • Tennessee Department of Human Services $100,000

Elderly Refugees

In FY 2005, ORR continued support for elderly refugees with a new discretionary grant program. This program brings together refugee service providers and mainstream area agencies on aging to coordinate programs for older refugees. Approximately $2,600,000 was awarded to 33 States to establish or expand working relationships with State and area agencies on aging to insure that older refugees would be linked to local community mainstream aging programs. Grants were awarded to Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Illinois, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin.

In addition, ORR continued its working relationship with the Administration on Aging to identify ways in which both networks could work together more effectively at the State and local community levels to improve access to services for elderly refugees.

Victims of Torture

The Support for Services of Torture Victims Program recognizes that many individuals residing in the U.S., including refugees, asylees, immigrants, other displaced persons, and U.S. citizens, have experienced torture by foreign governments. It has been estimated that over 400,000 torture survivors reside in the U.S.

This program provides torture survivors with the rehabilitation services that enable them to become productive community members. Although there are opportunities for treatment and training in many urban areas, many torture survivors do not have access to these highly specialized programs in the areas where they reside. This program increases torture survivors’ access to psychological, medical, social, and legal services. Treatment is provided regardless of immigration status. While the program focuses on providing health, social, and legal services to torture survivors, it also provides funds for research and training to service providers.

The program was first authorized under The Torture Victims Relief Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-320; 22 U.S.C. 2152 note) and was reauthorized in 2003 by Public Law 108-179.

In FY 2005, ORR funded 26 projects in the following 17 States: California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas Utah and Virginia. These projects are focused on the provision of direct services to persons who have been tortured or to the family members or other close persons who have witnessed the torture.

In addition, one grantee, the Center for Victims of Torture, provides technical assistance to the other grantees.

These projects are currently in the second year of a two-year project period.

Year Two Awards

  • Center for Victims of Torture (technical assistance nationwide), Minneapolis, Minnesota, $500,773.
  • Health and Hospitals Corporation/ NYU/Bellevue, New York City, New York, $289,970.
  • Center for Victims of Torture, Minneapolis, Minnesota, $386,627.
  • Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, $289,970.
  • Center for Multicultural Human Services, Falls Church, Virginia, $425,290.
  • Jewish Family Service of Gulf Coast, Clearwater, Florida, $425,290.
  • Boston Medical Center Corporation, Boston, Massachusetts, $386,627.
  • F.I.R.S.T. Project, Lincoln, Nebraska, $376,962.
  • Safe Horizon, New York City and New Jersey, $386,627.
  • Heartland Alliance for Human Needs, Chicago, Illinois, $376,962.
  • Program for Torture Victims, Los Angeles, California, $425,290.
  • Survivors of Torture International , San Diego, California, $425,290.
  • Rocky Mountain Survivors, Denver, Colorado, $425,290.
  • Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, $376,895.
  • Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Service, Dearborn, Michigan, $425,290.
  • Minnesota Advocates for Human Rights, Minneapolis, Minnesota, $265,806.
  • Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service, multi-site, $425,290.
  • Lutheran Children and Family Services, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, $318,968.
  • Advocates for Survivors of Torture and Trauma, Baltimore, Maryland, $376,962.
  • DeKalb County Board of Health, Atlanta metropolitan area, Georgia, $338,299.
  • Center for Survivors of Torture, Dallas, Texas, $338,299.
  • St. Anselm’s Cross-Cultural Community Center, Garden Grove ( Orange County), California, $265,806.
  • TIDES Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, $145,667.
  • Asian Association of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, $357,796.
  • Boat People SOS, Houston, Texas, $296,619.
  • Lowell Community Health Center, Inc., Lowell, Massachusetts, $241,642.
  • City of St. Louis Mental Health Board of Trustees, St. Louis, Missouri, $333,533.

Victims of Trafficking

The Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA) designates the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as the agency responsible for helping victims of human trafficking become eligible to receive benefits and services so they may rebuild their lives safely in the U.S.

The HHS trafficking program in the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) is charged with the following activities:

  • Certify international victims of human trafficking.
  • Provide outreach and education to service providers, non-governmental organizations and state and local governments on the phenomenon of trafficking.
  • Award discretionary grants designed to provide outreach and direct services to victims.
  • Administer a public awareness campaign designed to rescue and restore victims of trafficking.
  • Collect statistics on public benefits accessed by trafficking victims and report findings annually to Congress.

Certifications and Letters of Eligibility

On March 28, 2001, HHS Secretary Thompson delegated the authority to conduct certification activities to the Assistant Secretary for Children and Families, who in turn re-delegated authority on April 18, 2002, to the Director of the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR).

Section 107(b)(1)(E) of the TVPA states that HHS, after consultation with the Attorney General, may certify a victim of a severe form of trafficking who

  • is willing to assist in every reasonable way in the investigation and prosecution of severe forms of trafficking in persons; and
     
  • (a) has made a bona fide application for a visa under section 101(a)(15)(T) of the Immigration and Nationality Act…that has not been denied; or (b) is a person whose continued presence in the United States the Attorney General is ensuring in order to effectuate prosecution of traffickers in persons.

The TVPA authorizes the “certification” of adult victims to receive certain federally-funded or federally-administered benefits and services, such as cash assistance, medical care, food stamps, and housing. Victims who are minors receive “letters of eligibility” for the same types of services. In FY 2005, ORR issued 196 certifications to adults and 34 eligibility letters to minors for a total of 230.

These certifications and eligibility letters, combined with the 163 letters issued in FY 2004, the 151 letters issued in FY 2003, the 99 letters issued in FY 2002, and the 198 letters issued in FY 2001, bring to 841 the total number of letters issued during the first five fiscal years in which the program has operated.

FY 2005 letters were sent to victims or their representatives in 19 states. The largest concentrations were in California, New York, and Texas. Countries of origin included Cambodia, Albania, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Cameroon, Columbia, Chad, Czech Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Kenya, Korea, Latvia, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nepal, Nigeria, Paraguay, Russia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Western Samoa.

The highest populations of victims originated in Korea (23.5 percent), Thailand (11.7 percent), Peru (10.0 percent), and Mexico (9.6 percent).

Service Grants

ORR has utilized discretionary grants to create a network of service organizations available to assist victims of a severe form of trafficking. In this endeavor, ORR has collaborated closely with the Department of Justice’s Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), which also is awarding grants to provide services to victims of trafficking. ORR and OVC meet regularly to review the status of the national service delivery mechanism. In the case of unaccompanied minors who are victims of trafficking, the policy of HHS is to enroll them in the Unaccompanied Refugee Minor (URM) program. This enrollment can be accomplished very rapidly (usually within 24 hours of ORR being made aware of a victim), and URM offers a variety of care situations appropriate to the needs of the victim.

Since the inception of its trafficking program in FY01, ORR has awarded discretionary grants to 28 organizations. The FY01 grants provided $1.25 million in funding to eight organizations for an eighteen-month period that ended in March 2003. The purpose of these grants was to assist victims and promote awareness of the trafficking issue by hosting training and media activities. In FY02 and FY03, all trafficking grant awards were for a one-year period, renewable annually for an additional two years.

ORR awarded these service grants in two categories. Category One grants fund projects that raise awareness of trafficking in persons and/or provide case management and direct services to victims. Category One grant projects include establishing nationwide networks of anti-trafficking organizations and providers to victims of trafficking. Category Two grants fund technical assistance projects that provide training and technical expertise to law enforcement agencies, social service providers, faith-based communities, and professional associations.

In FY 2005, ORR did not award any new Category One or Category Two grants; rather it awarded only Street Outreach grants. To complete the final year of direct services, approximately $3.2 million was granted to the FY 2003 grantees in FY 2005. Plans for service provision in FY 2006 include the procurement of a new per-capita services contract that would provide nationwide coverage for victims of human trafficking.

Street Outreach Grants

In FY 2005, ORR awarded 18 grants for street outreach to organizations to help them identify victims of trafficking among populations among whom they are already operating. Because they are engaged in current outreach, the groups have expertise on those populations and have built a level of trust among them. Some of the vulnerable population groups to which the grantees provide outreach are homeless and at-risk youth, girls exploited through commercial sex, migrant farm workers, prostitutes, and women exploited in beauty parlors and nail salons.

Grantees include public, private for-profit (although HHS funds may not be paid as profit), and private nonprofit organizations, including faith-based organizations. Grantees qualify for the street outreach grant whether or not their current activities pertain to trafficking. The grants support direct, person-to-person contact, information sharing, counseling and other communication between agents of the grant recipient and members of a specified target population.

Rescue and Restore Victims of Human Trafficking Public Awareness Campaign

FY 2005 encompassed months seven through eighteen of the HHS public awareness campaign, Rescue and Restore Victims of Human Trafficking. The second year of the campaign targeted intermediaries—those persons or entities who are most likely to come into contact with victims, such as: local law enforcement officials (particularly vice squads); social service providers; health care professionals; faith-based organizations; domestic violence groups; ethnic organizations; refugee assistance professionals; homeless assistance professionals; drug rehabilitation organizations; child protective services officials; juvenile court officials; educational organizations; and legal assistance organizations. Outreach efforts included development of local coalitions, local and national media outreach, distribution of original campaign materials, and development of national partnerships.

As a measure of success of the campaign, nearly 4,000 calls were made to the campaign hotline through September 30, 2005 resulting in more than 120 case leads to law enforcement and nearly 20 percent of calls referred to local organizations. In addition, local and national media outreach efforts have resulted in more than 173.3 million media impressions.

Local Coalitions

By the end of FY 2005, HHS anti-trafficking coalitions had been established in 17 cities. These coalitions enlist local community organizations in the task of abolishing trafficking within their community; more than 900 local and national organizations have formally partnered with the Rescue and Restore Victims of Human Trafficking public awareness campaign. The purpose of these coalitions is to disseminate information on the phenomenon of trafficking, to train appropriate organizations of intermediaries, and to otherwise galvanize the community to identify and rescue victims.

The campaign’s ten launches in FY 2005—Chicago, Las Vegas, Long Island, Los Angeles, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Portland, St. Louis, and Seattle—generated a significant amount of media coverage, resulting in increased community awareness of services available for victims and making it more likely that concerned citizens will take action if they believe they have come into contact with a victim. Such coverage and media reports on trafficking in general have focused on the services that are available to victims versus trafficking prosecutions.

By September 30, 2005, media impressions surrounding Year Two launches totaled more than 22.5 million. To ensure maximum coverage of HHS’ efforts to assist trafficking victims and on-the-ground efforts to identify victims in launch cities, HHS limited the presence of multiple federal agencies at launch press events and, rather, showcased the efforts of local coalition members and available resources for victims. By working with local coalition partners prior to launch, HHS was better equipped to provide media with market-specific information about human trafficking, as well as local resources to tap for interviews or additional information.

Examples of the work of the HHS coalitions include:

  • In St. Louis, a Rescue & Restore coalition member organization learned of 20 Latino males who had entered the country legally on H2 work visas, but who became trafficking victims. The men were enticed to St. Louis by a landscape contractor who confiscated their visas and other identity documents. The men were kept at a remote farm and were charged $56 a week for “rent.” They were transported to worksites at 5 a.m. and returned at 9 p.m. and received no record of their wages and very little money for their labor. When one of the men broke his arm at a worksite, the contractor left the injured man at a local hospital and dropped off the rest of the crew at a vacant lot without money or their visas. A Rescue & Restore coalition member made contact with the injured man and his fellow workers and helped to provide them with appropriate guidance surrounding their experience.
  • Also in St. Louis, an attorney who had been trained by Rescue & Restore learned of a Guatemalan girl in domestic service who was a potential trafficking victim. The girl had legally entered the U.S. on a visitor’s visa, however, a domestic violence intake specialist suspected the girl had been brought into the country for the purpose of having a baby for the couple who sponsored her. Rescue & Restore grantee Heartland Alliance provided the girl with legal representation.
     
  • In Seattle, a Rescue & Restore member, the Refugee Resettlement Office of the Episcopal Diocese of Western Washington, contacted HHS about the plight of 100 Thai farm workers in Chelan County. The team passed the information on to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Washington and enlisted a Rescue & Restore coalition partner to make direct contact with the workers and conduct assessments. All information was provided to law enforcement.
  • Los Angeles City Councilman Tony Cardenas introduced a City Council Resolution naming Rescue & Restore as the official trafficking coalition of Los Angeles.

Local and National Media Outreach

In addition to media outreach efforts in advance of city launch events, HHS worked with media in different regions to encourage coverage of local coalition and campaign-related activities. HHS generated media interest and coverage via local activities and angles, such as in Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona, where HHS’s public affairs team contacted local wire, print, and broadcast reporters prior to task force training events in order to raise awareness about human trafficking and to garner coverage of the events. Media were particularly interested in profiling victims, and HHS’ public affairs team worked with intermediaries and local organizations to help identify victims who would be willing to tell their stories on a national level. These efforts resulted in two Associated Press news briefs in the daily statewide daybook for reporters; an interview for Dr. Wade Horn, HHS Assistant Secretary for the Administration of Children and Families, with the Tucson Citizen; a radio piece on KJZZ-FM (NPR – Phoenix), and; two television segments on KPNX-TV (NBC – Phoenix) and KPHO-TV (CBS – Phoenix).

Similarly, in July 2005, the Illinois Rescue & Restore coalition, in conjunction with HHS, hosted a series of regional action team meetings in Elgin, River Forest, and Springfield, IL. In support of these meetings, HHS’ public affairs team conducted local media outreach to journalists throughout the state resulting in coverage in the statewide Associated Press daybook and articles in the local Beacon News, Elgin Daily Herald, and Courier News newspapers. Similar efforts garnered coverage of the training held in Yakima, Washington, on August 2005, including an article in El Sol de Yakima, and broadcast reports on KAPP-TV (ABC – Yakima), KNDO-TV (NBC – Yakima), KGW-TV (NBC – Spokane) and Northwest Public Radio, an affiliate station of the Northwest News Network that maintains nine other stations throughout Washington, Oregon and Idaho.

The HHS public affairs team also explored additional national media angles and capitalized on celebrity partnerships with, for example, singer Ricky Martin, to help raise awareness of human trafficking. HHS worked with Mr. Martin to produce television public service announcements (“PSAs”) in English and Spanish that were distributed to more than 150 stations across the country including national networks, cable news networks, cable entertainment networks and 15 campaign target markets. In addition, English and Spanish radio PSAs were distributed via satellite to more than 300 stations across the country. Distribution of the Ricky Martin PSAs garnered more than 66 million radio PSA placements and 750,000 impressions for television placements both in English and Spanish media. The English radio PSA aired a total of 1,605 times in nine of the nation’s top-10 media markets and in 48 of the top 50. In addition, the Spanish radio PSA generated a total 167 airings in seven of the nation’s top-10 media markets and in 28 of the top 50 markets. The television and radio PSAs were both played in seven of the top-10 markets throughout the county with total media impressions estimated to be more than 67 million.

In August 2005, HHS distributed a press release and pitched key national and Hispanic media outlets on the Rescue & Restore partnership with the Ricky Martin Foundation that generated extensive media coverage, with print and broadcast stories in more than 30 news outlets, including the Associated Press, People en Espanol, Telemundo, Univision, Yahoo! En Espanol, Washington Hispanic, and El Diario.

Original Campaign Materials

Nearly one million  Rescue & Restore materials—posters, brochures, fact sheets, and cards with tips on identifying victims—were distributed through the campaign’s more than 900 national and local partners. The materials can be previewed on the HHS website, www.acf.hhs.gov/trafficking.

In addition, HHS produced a 10-minute video to help train intermediaries on how to recognize cases of human trafficking and learn how to initiate support services for those victims. The video showcases trafficking experts and victims in an effort to shed light on the horrors of trafficking, as well as the resources available to help victims rebuild their lives.

The video was distributed via mailing in August 2005 to the then more than 800 Rescue & Restore coalition members across the country. It is also promoted via the campaign website, Rescue & Restore training sessions, booth exhibits and speaking engagements, as well as in campaign mailings to media and intermediary groups.

To further increase awareness of the campaign and to drive more individuals to the Rescue & Restore website, the website address www.rescueandrestore.org was incorporated into campaign materials (e.g., Ricky Martin PSA), where appropriate, and provided target audiences with a campaign resource that could be easily remembered. Given the security measures in place surrounding any government Website, www.rescueandrestore.org serves simply as a placeholder site that directs visitors to the official campaign site, www.acf.hhs.gov/trafficking, for more information.

The number of visitors to the Rescue & Restore website in FY 2005 tripled over the previous year.

National Partners

In FY 2005, HHS focused on the expansion of current national partnerships and the development of new relationships to increase the level of awareness.

  • HHS provided speakers to participate in law enforcement trainings and internal staff meetings to educate the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) staff on the issue of human trafficking.
  • HHS secured a partnership with recording artist Natalie Grant and worked with her on a human trafficking-focused radio PSA for distribution to mainstream and Christian music stations.
  • HHS developed articles for publications of the National Consumer League, the American Medical Association, National Association of School Nurses, Forensic Nurse Association, American College of Emergency Physicians, and the National Association of Urban Hospitals. Additionally, HHS secured interest from the National Sheriffs’ Association (NSA) that resulted in an HHS presentation at both the mid-winter conference and annual conference.
  • Other notable national organizations joining Rescue & Restore as national partners include World Relief, the National Immigration Law Center, Assembly of God Charities, the Protection Project of Johns Hopkins University, and Tibet House.

Under the TVPA as originally enacted, grantees could not use HHS-funded assistance for pre-certified adult victims of trafficking. Depending on case circumstances, the prohibition frequently created a federal assistance gap between the time the victim was identified (whether by law enforcement or by NGOs) and the time of certification. During that time, grantees attempted to identify other sources of funds. In the case of nonentitlement programs, the TVPRA authorized HHS to provide benefits and services to assist potential victims in achieving certification.

Unaccompanied Alien Children Program

Pursuant to Section 462 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, the custody and care of unaccompanied alien children transferred from the former Immigration and Naturalization Service to the Office of Refugee Resettlement’s (ORR), Division of Unaccompanied Children’s Services (DUCS) in March 2003. Since then, the number of children in DUCS care has steadily increased. With an operating budget of $53.7 million in 2005, ORR/DUCS placed 7,787 children in its various housing facilities. This averaged to about 869 children in care at any point in time, which is over the 662 average from the previous fiscal year. In response to the increase in number of children in care, ORR/DUCS added nearly 500 beds to its capacity of care.

A Continuum of Care

ORR/DUCS focused on developing a full continuum of care for unaccompanied alien children, adding a variety of care options, such as 22 shelter facilities, transitional foster care homes, 2 staff-secure facilities, 3 innovative secure facilities, and residential treatment centers for children with psychiatric and mental health needs. In FY 2005, ORR placed 20 unaccompanied alien children in residential mental health treatment centers.

In addition, through agreements with the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) and the Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Services (LIRS), in FY 2005, ORR/DUCS expanded its foster care beds to 70 placements to serve special needs children, including parenting and pregnant teens and children under the age of 12. Unaccompanied alien children who have been in shelter care for prolonged periods of time, are of young age, or have demonstrated that their needs would be best served in a less structured environment are considered for long-term foster care. In FY 2005, DUCS referred a total of ­73 children to DUCS-funded long term foster care. Of those 73, 63 were placed during FY 05 and the remaining 10 were placed in the beginning of FY 06. In addition, there were 13 placements into ORR-funded Asylees and Cuban/Haitian Entrants program .

When the former Immigration and Naturalization Service transferred its program to ORR in early 2003, approximately one-third of the unaccompanied alien children in its care were housed in secure county or local juvenile detention centers. In 2004, as an alternative to the court-administered juvenile detention centers, DUCS developed staff-secure (medium secure) beds to house unaccompanied alien children with serious behavioral concerns or with non-violent, non-assaultive criminal backgrounds. DUCS focused on ensuring only youth with violent or repeated juvenile offenses were placed in a secure detention setting. As a result, less than three percent of all unaccompanied alien children in DUCS’ care are in secure detention, a 78 percent decrease from the Immigration and Naturalization Service. During FY 2005, DUCS utilized 32 staff secure beds.

Release and Reunification

In August 2004, ORR/DUCS took over from the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the responsibility for the release of unaccompanied alien children in DUCS’ custody to family members or other eligible sponsors living in the United States. This entails completing finger print background checks on children’s sponsors, which is accomplished through an inter-agency agreement with HHS’ Program Support Center. This agreement is being developed and implemented in stages and will be fully operational during FY 2006. Case Managers on the DUCS staff review and evaluate sponsors’ documentation with the shelters’ case managers, review the release recommendations from the DUCS Field Coordinators, and consult with Department of Homeland Security officials, when needed, to ensure a prompt and safe reunification takes place.

Home Suitability Assessments

DUCS also completes home suitability assessments on select families to whom the children are being released through agreements with USCCB and LIRS, two voluntary agencies with a nationwide network of affiliate social service agencies. Previously, under the former Immigration and Naturalization Service, home assessments were limited to Chinese and Indian families due to smuggling concerns. DUCS continues to require home assessments on every Chinese and Indian child before releasing to family members, but has expanded home assessments to potential sponsors of any nationality. In these cases, questions may arise on the family members’ ability to care for the minor’s specific needs, on the child’s ability to adapt to a home environment, and for safety concerns overall. In FY 2004, DUCS completed a total of ­­­176 home suitability assessments, including a 90-day follow-up for all minors.

A Field Presence

In FY 2005, DUCS added 4 federal employees to the field ( Phoenix, Harlingen, Houston, and Miami) to carry out inherently federal functions and to coordinate efforts between the Department of Homeland Security, the Executive Office for Immigration Review, ORR and other agencies and stakeholders in the program.

Previously, in FY 2004, DUCS established a field presence in conjunction with USCCB and LIRS. Ten Field Coordinators were deployed to high immigration apprehension areas across the U.S. The Field Coordinators, employed by USCCB and LIRS, work as DUCS liaison in the field, review family reunification requests and make preliminary recommendations to DUCS as to whether the child’s potential sponsor is a viable, appropriate release option. They regularly meet with children, identify alternate placements, do crisis intervention, and assist DUCS in developing procedures.

Tracking and Management System

In FY 2004, DUCS began developing a web-based Tracking and Management System (TMS) which will ultimately track children from initial placement by DUCS to release or return to the home country. Populating this database will greatly enhance DUCS’ reporting abilities and will assist DUCS Project Managers in monitoring facility activity. As the TMS is developed, it is expected to incorporate case management functions, including intake assessments and release and transfer requests.

Inter-Agency Agreements

Starting in FY 2004, ORR/DUCS implemented an interagency agreement with the Public Health Service to provide health services and special therapeutic placements for children in DUCS’ care.

DUCS also finalized an inter-agency agreement with the Administration for Children, Youth, and Families to provide care and placement for UAC at runaway and homeless youth shelters in California, Washington, and Texas. This effort proved effective in reducing administrative costs by using established ACF programs.

Pro Bono and Child Protection Advocates

In FY 2005, DUCS launched a pro bono outreach pilot program to recruit attorneys to provide legal services for UAC. In addition, DUCS continued a child protection advocate pilot project in Chicago to serve as a model for a nationwide program.

DUCS continued collaborative efforts with a pro bono working group whose goal is to establish a national coordinated outreach program to ensure legal representation for all children in DUCS’ care. Work group partners included representatives from the Executive Office of Immigration Review of the Department of Justice, the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children, the Department of Homeland Security, the American Bar Association, UNHCR, and HHS’ General Counsel.

Minors in Care
FY 2004 and FY 2005

 

FY 2004

FY 2005

OCT

506

780

NOV

488

770

DEC

504

690

JAN

474

594

FEB

579

626

MAR

614

756

APRIL

663

801

MAY

760

988

JUNE

780

1,014

JULY

819

1,039

AUG

867

1,122

SEPT

888

1,246

 

FY 2005 CAPACITY

Month

Shelter

Trans.

Foster

Secure

Staff

Total

Care

Care

Care

Detention

Secure

 

OCT

721

78

70

24

32

925

NOV

721

78

70

24

32

925

DEC

721

78

70

24

32

925

JAN

721

78

70

24

32

925

FEB

721

78

70

24

32

925

MAR

721

78

70

24

32

925

APR

775

78

70

24

32

979

MAY

887

78

70

24

32

1,091

JUN

915

78

70

26

32

1,121

JUL

990

78

70

26

42

1,206

AUG

1,026

78

70

26

42

1,242

SEP

1,032

94

70

26

42

1,264

 

Placements by Month, FY 2005

Month

Shelter

Transitional

Foster

Secure

Staff

Total

Care

Care

Care

Detention

Secure

FY05

OCT

467

86

4

26

21

604

NOV

463

56

8

11

8

546

DEC

482

78

3

9

11

583

JAN

386

41

10

13

7

457

FEB

501

55

1

6

5

568

MAR

597

77

1

7

10

692

APR

566

62

3

9

18

658

MAY

624

71

3

5

8

711

JUN

611

87

8

9

13

728

JUL

588

72

6

10

23

699

AUG

725

82

5

13

23

848

SEP

565

73

11

16

28

693

TOTAL

6,575

840

63

134

175

7,787

U.S. Repatriation Program

The U.S. Repatriation Program was established by Title XI, Section 1113 of the Social Security Act (Assistance for United States Citizens Returned from Foreign Countries), in 1935 to provide temporary assistance to U.S. citizens and their dependents who have been returned to the U.S. from a foreign country because of destitution, illness, war, threat of war, or similar crisis and are without available resources.

Temporary assistance is defined as money payments, medical care, temporary billeting, transportation, and other goods and services necessary for the health or welfare of individuals (including guidance, counseling, and other welfare services), furnished to United States (U.S.) citizens and their dependents who are without available resources in the U.S. upon their arrival from abroad and for such period after their arrival, not exceeding 90 days, as may be provided in regulations of the Secretary of Health and Human Services ( HHS). Certain temporary assistance may be furnished beyond the 90-day period in the case of any citizen or dependent upon a finding that the circumstances involved necessitate or justify the furnishing of such assistance beyond such period in that particular case (42 United States Code (U.S.C.) 1313).

The Program contains four different activities. Two of these are characterized by ongoing caseloads. These are the regular individual repatriations under Section 1113 of the Social Security Act and the assistance provided to mentally ill repatriates found under 24 U.S.C. 321. The other two activities are contingency activities. One is the emergency repatriation responsibility assigned under Executive Order (E.O.) 12656 (amended by E.O. 13074, February 9,1998; E.O. 13228, October 8, 2001; E.O. 13286, February 28, 2003). The other is group repatriations for which, by the extension of the E.O. precedent, HHS often has responsibility and for which it uses the Section 1113 authority. Operationally, these types of activities involve different kinds of preparation, resources and execution. However, the core program policies and administrative procedures are essentially the same for each.

The Department of State (DOS) requests assistance from the U.S. Repatriation Program for national emergency evacuations and also certifies that citizens and their dependents are eligible for repatriation assistance, and returns them to the U.S. Upon arrival in the U.S., services for repatriates are the responsibility of the Secretary of HHS. The Secretary has delegated this responsibility to the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) and to the Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) within ACF.

ORR maintains a cooperative agreement with International Social Service— United States of America (ISS-USA) for the administration of the program’s individual activities. ISS-USA assists in the administration of the nationwide non-emergency program; maintains the network of local providers in the State governments and in the private sector; trains and guides workers in procedures for complex cases, such as unaccompanied minors, individuals with serious medical or mental problems, incompetent adults, and victims of domestic violence; and serves as a point of guidance and technical assistance to States. In consultation with ORR, ISA-USA provides information on specific benefits with which all local providers may not be familiar, such as Medicaid, Medicare, Supplementary Security Income (SSI) and veteran’s benefits. In addition, ISS-USA consults with ORR and Overseas Citizens Services (DOS/OCS) for services to clients who have a criminal history in the U.S.

During the 2005 fiscal year there has been no mass evacuation. However, during the early portion of the year there were many hours of debriefing following the mass evacuation from Grand Cayman on September 16 and 17, 2004, following a strike by Hurricane Ivan.

Even though a mass evacuation was not necessitated by the tsunami disaster of late December 2004, ISS-USA did serve as a conduit for several inquiries related to children identified without pa-

rental caretakers in Indonesian hospitals following the event. These efforts helped link agencies in the affected areas with the DOS task force formed in response to the emergency situation abroad. This served to help minimize the possibility of orphaned U.S. citizens remaining unidentified.

The following table contains the types of assistance provided by ORR through its cooperative agreement with ISS-USA to eligible repatriates during FY 2005.

Assistance

2005

Financial

94

Food

26

Travel

27

Clothing

30

Ambulance

17

Police

1

Hospital

54

Escort

3

Shelter

108

Wheel Chair

12

Medical

62

Total

434

 

Last Reviewed: June 24, 2019