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  • Class 3 Human Trafficking Leadership Academy Fellows (New)

    Published: March 15, 2019
    HTLA Class 3 Fellows Sue Aboul-Hosn Shanika Ampah Shemeka Dawson Nathan Earl Maria-Clara Harrington Keisha Head (not pictured) Christa Hernandez Sophie James Mersada Mujkanovic Marta Pedro Ljiljana Petrovic Yinay Ruiz
  • Tentative Agenda: May 28, 2019 (New)

    Published: March 6, 2019
    Registration coming soon. Virtual attendees will be able to submit comments through a chat box. Email NHTTAC or call 844-648-8822 for more information or to speak with a NHTTAC specialist. Where: Phoenix, Arizona (RSVPs only - email Ava.Donald@acf.hhs.gov to RSVP to attend the meeting in person.) May 28, 2019 | 9:30 AM – 5:00 PM EST 9:30 AM Call to Order Remote Connection Logistics Roll Call/Quorum Welcome 9:45 AM Welcome and Committee Business Review Responsibilities Review Agenda 9:50 AM Open Issues Membership Update 10:00 AM New Business Outline of Recommendations of Best Practices for States 11:30 PM Break 1:00 PM Continue Subcommittee presentations 4:00 PM Public Comments 4:30 PM Logistics and Next Steps 5:00 PM Adjournment Internal Activities May 29, 2019 | 9:30 AM – 5 PM EST 9:30 AM Subcommittee Breakout Sessions 12:00 PM Break 2:00 PM Fact-finding Site Visits 5:00 PM Adjournment Helpful links Representative Members Public Comments Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act
  • Human Trafficking Leadership Academy Class IV

    Published: January 29, 2019
    The Human Trafficking Leadership Academy (HTLA) is a fellowship that brings together a diverse group of survivors and ally professionals to build their leadership skills, knowledge, and professional network while collaborating to enhance programming and services that support survivors of human trafficking and those at risk of being trafficked. Fellows will be asked to: Participate in 2 full-day seminars once per month for 5 months Collaborate virtually between each seminar (approximately 2–4 hours per week) to develop recommendations Think deeply about your own leadership journey, challenges, and successes Learn from other fellows, additional subject matter experts, and community leaders Apply new tools and resources to build your leadership skills Expand your professional network to include a diverse group of professionals Present your team's recommendations to federal stakeholders in Washington, DC Learn more about HTLA and recommendations from past alumni.
  • Human Trafficking Leadership Academy: Eligibility Criteria

    Published: January 29, 2019
    Participation in the Human Trafficking Leadership Academy (HTLA) will require flexibility, self-care, mindfulness, introspection, openness, and a willingness to embrace challenges. Fellows should have a desire to develop their leadership skills, build their professional network, and work with a diverse team to develop recommendations to the Office on Trafficking in Persons and other federal agencies. Exceptional candidates are those who wish to learn from and work with a network of diverse professionals with various lived experiences and professional expertise. Applicants must have: Eligibility to work in the United States A minimum of 3–4 years of professional and/or lived experience in a career that enables them to contribute to the project question A span of 3–5 years since trafficking victimization, if the individual identifies as a survivor or identifies as having lived-experience with human trafficking The ability to self-identify any potential challenges and triggers that may occur when working as a fellow and the ability to develop and maintain effective self-care strategies The ability to contribute and collaborate within a group setting, both in person and virtually Applicants cannot: Currently be involved in any active criminal or civil cases Minor exceptions possible on a case-by-case basis Be an alumni of the HTLA Questions? Review Frequently Asked Questions or Email info@nhttac.org for more information.
  • Human Trafficking Leadership Academy: Frequently Asked Questions

    Published: January 29, 2019
    Don’t see your question here? Email info@nhttac.org for more information. I was not selected to participate. Should I reapply? This a competitive program, with class size limited to 12 participants. Applicants are encouraged to reapply in the future. What is the time commitment? Fellows must attend each 2-day seminar. Fellows should expect to work 2-4 hours per week between seminars. I identify as a survivor and/or as having lived experience. Am I required to disclose this? No, you are not required to disclose this information. Each fellow is welcome to share anything they would like about their personal and professional experience. Additionally, we ask that other fellows do not disclose another participant's personal experiences. I am not a trafficking expert, but I have expertise that I can contribute to address the project question. Can I apply? Yes, you may apply if you have expertise that can support the development of recommendations within a group setting. Are travel expenses covered in advance? Lodging and airfare are paid for in advance by NHTTAC. Fellows are reimbursed for meals and ground travel. Where can I find information about past classes? You can find information on past classes, including their recommendations, at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/otip/training/nhttac/human-trafficking-leader.... What is Coro? Coro delivers customized leadership development experiences focused on a specific issue and/or population. Through its nuanced approach to leadership, Coro has expanded leadership capacity in universities, local government, and nonprofits. For more information, visit https://coronorcal.org/ What is the Office on Trafficking in Persons (OTIP)? OTIP operates under the Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services. OTIP's mission is to "combat human trafficking by supporting and leading systems that prevent trafficking through public awareness and protect victims through identification and assistance, helping them rebuild their lives and become self-sufficient." For information on OTIP, visit https://www.acf.hhs.gov/otip. What is the National Human Trafficking Training and Technical Assistance Center (NHTTAC)? Funded by OTIP, NHTTAC delivers training and technical assistance (T/TA) to inform and enhance the public health response to human trafficking. For more information, visit https://www.acf.hhs.gov/otip/training/nhttac. I'm interested in this fellowship, but these dates don't work for me. How can I get updates on future opportunities? Email info@nhttac.org and ask to be added to the NHTTAC listserv for email updates on the HTLA as well as other fellowship and scholarship opportunities. The application requires that I submit a one- to two-paragraph bio. Who has access to this? Your bio is reviewed as part of your application by NHTTAC, Coro, OTIP, and a panel of HTLA alumni. If selected, bios of selected applicants will be shared with the other fellows as part of the onboarding process. Who attends the final presentation and graduation ceremony? OTIP, NHTTAC, and other federal stakeholders who have an interest in the recommendations. Fellows are also encouraged to invite a support person to attend the presentation. I'm interested in this fellowship, but this project question is not a good fit for me. What are my options? Email info@nhttac.org and ask to be added to the NHTTAC listserv for email updates on the HTLA as well as other fellowship and scholarship opportunities.
  • OTIP Program Infographics for FY18

    Published: January 28, 2019
    Use these infographics to learn about the impact of OTIP grantees during fiscal year 2018. Domestic Victims of Human Trafficking Program: In FY 2018, we provided $3,172,199 in grant funding to 12 organizations for the Domestic Victims of Human Trafficking (DVHT) Program to provide comprehensive case management, direct services, and referrals through community partnerships to U.S. citizens and Lawful Permanent Residents who have experienced human trafficking (domestic trafficking). Look Beneath the Surface Regional Anti-Trafficking Program: In FY 2018, we provided $2,000,000 in grant funding for the Look Beneath the Surface Regional Anti-Trafficking Program—formerly the Rescue & Restore Victims of Human Trafficking Regional Program. Grantees focused on identifying and referring domestic and foreign national victims of human trafficking for services in 10 communities from October 1, 2017—September 30, 2018.   Trafficking Victim Assistance Program: In FY 2018, we provided $7,498,802 in grant funding for the Trafficking Victim Assistance Program (TVAP), to provide comprehensive case management services to foreign national victims of human trafficking seeking HHS Certification and their qualified family members through a national network of service providers.
  • 2019 Charter: National Advisory Committee on the Sex Trafficking of Children & Youth in the United States

    Published: January 18, 2019
    The National Advisory Committee on the Sex Trafficking of Children and Youth in the United States (hereinafter referred to as the National Advisory Committee) is established pursuant to Section 121 of the Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act (Pub.L. 113-183). The formation and operation of the National Advisory Committee are governed by the provisions of Public Law 92-463, as amended (5 U.S.C. App. 2), which sets forth standards for the formation and use of federal advisory committees.
  • Preliminary Recommendations to Strengthen the Nation’s Response to the Sex Trafficking of Children and Youth in the United States

    Published: January 17, 2019
    The National Advisory Committee on the Sex Trafficking of Children and Youth in the United States (the Committee) envisions a comprehensive response to the sex trafficking of children and youth where federal, state, tribal, and local efforts effectively ensure victims are identified and cared for, perpetrators are held accountable, and conditions that foster trafficking are eradicated. The Committee recognizes the importance of strengthening the nation’s response to all forms of human trafficking, although the Committee’s mission is focused on child and youth sex trafficking in accordance with the Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act of 2014 (P.L. 113-183). Child and youth sex trafficking can be characterized as one of the most complex and least understood forms of child abuse. Traffickers take advantage of the societal, community, relationship, or individual vulnerabilities to exploit children and youth for monetary gain. Sex buyers exploit children and youth, providing demand and fueling the exploitation. Once trafficked, children often experience significant mental, physical, and sexual trauma due to their exploitation. A child’s victimization can last days or years but the consequences can be severe and prolonged, regardless of the duration. To effectively address the sex trafficking of children and youth, states must adopt a comprehensive approach that prioritizes trauma-informed practices to meeting victims’ needs as well as ensuring offender accountability. This report provides a preliminary outline of recommendations for states to improve their efforts to combat the crime of child and youth sex trafficking. Regardless of a state’s current response level or model, every state can benefit from a periodic, objective assessment of their response.
  • Webinar: A Public Health Approach to Human Trafficking

    Published: December 31, 2018
    One of the primary benefits of looking at human trafficking as a public health issue is the emphasis on prevention: that is, looking at the systemic issues that cause people to be vulnerable to human trafficking in the first place. Upstream determinants, such as domestic violence, substance use, poverty, and immigration status, may put some individuals at a higher risk for trafficking than others. A public health approach to trafficking moves upstream to identify preventive measures that, when combined with downstream interventions, can work to decrease the number of individuals who experience trafficking.
  • Radio Public Service Announcements

    Published: December 28, 2018
    Use these radio public service announcements in your community to raise awareness about human trafficking. English LBS Radio PSA for Faith-based and Community Organizations Script: If you encountered a victim of human trafficking, would you know? Anyone in your neighborhood, congregation or community can be a victim of sex or labor trafficking. Victims may be restricted from leaving their location, or may not be receiving fair pay for their work. Look beneath the surface. Visit acf.hhs.gov/endtrafficking or call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 888-373-7888. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.   English LBS Radio PSA for Youth Script: Human trafficking is when someone is being forced, tricked, or coerced to engage in a sex trade or forced labor. If you're a kid and forced to sell sex, drugs or work against your will, that's trafficking. You’re not a criminal; you’re a victim, and there is help available. Call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 888-373-7888 or Visit acf.hhs.gov/endtrafficking. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.   English LBS Radio PSA about Sex Trafficking Script: Do you know anyone who has paid for sex? Would they have bought it if they had known that person was being forced, tricked, or coerced against their will? Sex trafficking is human trafficking. Know the signs and look beneath the surface. To report a tip call 888-373-7888 or learn more at acf.hhs.gov/endtrafficking. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.   Spanish LBS Radio PSA about Labor Trafficking Script: Las víctimas de trata laboral pueden ser personas que vemos a diario. Ellos trabajan en restaurantes, fábricas, agricultura, cuidado de niños, y otros trabajos. Ve más allá de la superficie. Para hacer un reporte llama a la Línea Nacional Contra la Trata de Personas al 888-373-7888 o visita acf.hhs.gov/endtrafficking. Existe asistencia para las víctimas de la trata de personas incluyendo servicios legales. Patrocinado por el Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos.

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